J109

   
Dimensions ft/lb m/kg
LOA 35.25 10.75
LWL 30.50 9.30
Beam 11.50 3.51
Standard Draft 7.00 2.10
Standard Ballast 3,900 1,769
Displacement 10,900 4,944
Engine 28 hp 28 hp
100% SA 644 59.80
I 46.50 14.17
ISP 49.60 15.11
J 13.30 4.05
P 43.25 13.18
E 15.50 4.72
SA/Dspl 21 21
Dspl/L 172 172
   
   

Hull & Deck Construction

  • Baltek Contourkore end grained balsa composite construction using biaxal and unidirectional glass with vinylester resin on the outer hull layer for 10 year warranty against hull blisters.
  • Patented “SCRIMP” resin infusion system moulding process for optimum laminate strength.
  • Off-white deck with a high traction non-skid.
  • White hull. Single tapered gel coat integrated double boot stripe.
  • Foredeck and helmsman moulded toe rails.
  • Large bow locker with laminated watertight forward collision bulkhead.
  • Large cockpit storage locker on starboard.
  • Propane bottle storage.
  • Moulded stern platform with removable swimming ladder.
  • Moulded spray shield with dodger storage and companionway instrument pod.
  • GRP moulded structural bulkhead bonded to hull and deck.
  • All intermediate bulkheads glassed to hull and deck for stiffness.
  • Heavy-duty fibreglass floor stringer grid infused into hull, including mast and chain plate structure.

Keel & Rudder

  • Low VCG Keel of cast lead with antimony bolted and bonded to deep molded stub with sump.
  • Balanced high aspect spade rudder construction using biaxal and unidirectional glass and large diameter anodised aluminium stock mounted in self-aligning bearings.
  • Aluminium wheel with natural leather grip on custom moulded pedestal with compass, brake and stainless guard.
  • Emergency tiller.

Spars & Rigging

 

  • Tapered aluminium mast with double airfoil spreader clear anodised.
  • Continuous Rod rigging (Nitronic 50).
  • Integral hydraulic backstay adjuster.
  • Boom with internal outhaul 8:1 purchase system, mainsail reef line sheaves, main sheet and rigid vang tangs.
  • Headsail furling system.
  • Retractable carbon fiber bowsprit with seal.
  • Solid boom vang with cascade purchase system.
  • Complete running rigging package

 

Deck Hardware

  • Self-tailing primary winches.
  • Self-tailing halyard winches.
  • lock-in winch handles.
  • 2 PVC handle holders.
  • Mainsheet purchase with fine tune.
  • Adjustable mainsheet traveller with 4:1 purchase led to a cleat on both sides.
  • Adjustable genoa and jib tracks with 4:1 car controls led to cleats by coach roof.
  • Cockpit foot blocks for genoa sheets.
  • Spinnaker sheet blocks on U-bolts.
  • Tack block on pad-eye at bowsprit end.
  • 5 halyard/reef turning blocks.
  • Halyards lead aft through 2 quadruple organizers and 4 rope clutches on each side of companionway.
  • Tack line led aft to rope clutch on starboard side of coach roof.
  • Bowsprit control line leading to a cam cleat on aft of coach roof bulkhead.
  • 2 bow mooring cleats.
  • 2 stern mooring cleats.
  • Stem head fitting.
  • Custom s/s stem plate with tack fitting, removable anchor roller.
  • S/S chain plates for shrouds and backstay.
  • Foredeck opening hatch (500 x 500) with vent.
  • Opening hatch (450 x 320) over main saloon.
  • 4 fixed ports (630 x 170) on saloon coach roof sides.
  • 2 opening ports (304 x 155) for aft cabin and toilet compartment.
  • 1 opening port (350 x 170) in cockpit (aft cabin).
  • 1 vent above head area.
  • 3 line bags.
  • 2 s/s handrails on coach roof.
  • S/S pushpit and pulpit .
  • Double s/s lifelines, 8 stainless stanchions, 4 with reinforcing leg.
  • Plexi-glass companionway washboards with lock and ventilation grid.
  • Door storage rack in cockpit locker.
  • Flag staff holder.

Auxiliary Power

  • Volvo D1-30 diesel 30 HP with Saildrive, 115 AH alternator, with double diode and fresh water-cooling with heat exchanger.
  • Engine panel recessed in the cockpit with plexi-glass protection including rev. counter, hour meter and alarms for oil pressure, low voltage and water temperature.
  • 85 litres (18.5 gallons) fuel tank under aft cabin berth.
  • Sound insulated engine compartment, ventilation pipes to the transom.
  • 2 bladed folding propeller
Systems
  • Manual bilge pump in cockpit.
  • Automatic/manual electric bilge pump with float switch.
  • Pressurized water system.
  • 1 water tank (96 litres) under starboard berth in saloon.
  • Ice box drain
  • Marine toilet
  • 80 AH house battery and 70 AH engine start battery with switches and double diode/circuit breaker.
  • 12V electric panel with fuel gauge and voltmeter.
  • Halogen lights on ceilings and swivelling tulip lights in cabins.
  • Ceiling light in head
  • Light in cockpit locker
  • Navigation lights on pushpit and pulpit, steaming light and mooring light.
  • Rig grounded for protection against lightning.
Interior
  • Interior built using wood, laminated or solid. All wooden parts are varnished or laminated with white Formica. Cabin sole in plywood laminated with wood effect Formica.
  • Vinyl lined ceilings throughout, but main saloon which has moulded slats on hull sides.

FORWARD CABIN

  • Large hanging locker on port side, storage on starboard.
  • Forward large double v-berth with storage underneath.
  • Shelve above berth on port side.
  • Access door to saloon.

MAIN SALOON

  • Settee/berths to starboard and port side with lift up pilot berths both sides.
  • Water tank under starboard berth.
  • Table with drop leafs and bottle storage in the centerline.
  • Large storage lockers behind backrests.
  • S/s hand rail on ceiling.

GALLEY (on port side)

  • Gimballed Propane stove with oven and 2 burners.
  • S/S double sink.
  • Pressurized cold water.
  • Large 90 litres moulded icebox/fridge with 12 volt compressor.
  • Full length locker outboard of galley countertop.
  • Cold moulded fiddles around the edge of the countertop.
  • Storage under sink with shelf and space for trash bin.
  • Drawers

CHART TABLE (on starboard side)

  • Large chart table facing forward with:
  • Charts storage under table lid
  • Locker under chart table
  • Shelf
  • Vinyl Nav. Seat cushion with backrest
  • Large hinged instruments panel, outboard, with electrical panel.

AFT CABIN (on port side)

  • Access door to saloon
  • Large hanging locker
  • Changing seat
  • Double berth
  • Access panel to engine
  • Fuel tank under berth

AFT HEAD (on starboard side)

  • Access door to saloon
  • Integral 2nd moulding for easy maintenance with integral shower tray, sink, access to valves and toilet support shelf.
  • Pressurised cold water
  • Marine toilet
  • Mirror, toilet roll holder and towel rail
  • Vanity unit
  • Shower grating
  • Access door to cockpit storage
  • Holding Tank

COMPANIONWAY

  • White Formica finish for better wear resistance.
  • Steps with angled treads between bulkheads.
  • Handrails integrated in bulkheads.
  • Main engine access through lifting panel.
  • Open locker
Options
  • Electric windlass
  • Removable Dock Box
  • Two Tone Deck
  • Four bookshelves and cupboards in lieu of hinged backrests.
  • Cushion
  • Opening ports in the aft face of coach roof
  • Opening ports in the main cabin
  • Pull out berth in the main cabin
  • Wood main bulkhead and wood hull linings in front cabin
  • 5.75’ Shoal Draft Keel
  • Additional capacity service battery for a total of 150 AH
  • Boot stripe in color other than grey
  • Cushion color other than standard grey
Notice

Specifications are subject to change prior to delivery due to deletions, additions or revisions in quantities, brand or design at the sole discretion of J/Boats, Inc. Newport,  RI

There are currently 350 J/109s sailing in fifteen countries worldwide, with large J/109 fleets existing in North America and Europe.  In North America, fleets exist in San Diego/ Los Angeles, Chesapeake/ Annapolis, Long Island Sound, Lake Michigan/ Chicago. In Europe, fleets exist in England/ The Solent, Ireland, Netherlands/ Belgium, France/ Bay of Biscay. If your looking for a great class to get involved in, look no further than this popular racer-cruiser- the J/109.  Go to the International J/109 Class website for more info.

J/109 Class Association Highlights:

  • Established in 1996
  • 10 North American Championships and 8 European Championships since 1996
  • Actively Maintained Class Website: www.j109.org

J/109 Class Association Links

  • United Kingdom/ Ireland

  • USA/ Canada

  • J/109 Tuning Guide Links

  • Doyle Sails

  • Elvstrom Sails

  • North Sails

  • Quantum Sails
  • J109_spin01

    SAILING ANARCHY Review

    By Scot Tempesta

    Many have tried; most have failed in the quest to build a right and proper racer/cruiser. While there are a few bright exceptions, most fall disappointingly short in one category or the other. Of course, the category where most of them fail is as a racer. The main culprits can often be narrowed down to these unfortunate characteristics: Too heavy, poor layout, small cockpits, and weak sail plans.

    I had the chance to test sail one of the latest entrants into the R/C arena, the new J-109, courtesy of Jeff Trask and the So Cal J-Boat Dealer, Sail California (www.sailcal.com). In typical fashion, J-Boats have done a good job, through their national advertising, in presenting this boat as a very attractive product, so I must admit I already liked the boat, at least in pictures, before I had actually seen it. I guess that advertising stuff really works.

    We sailed out of Newport Beach, and upon first seeing the boat, my initial thought was that it is a handsome, well-proportioned, modern-looking boat. Stylistically, while still clearly a J-Boat, the 109 exhibits a slightly more progressive look than previous efforts. It is worth noting that this design was a collaboration of Rod Johnstone and son Alan, with Alan assuming the lead chair. At a touch over 35', the first impression is that it is a big boat, with a good sized cockpit, long but low cabin house, big rig, sprit, almost plumb bow, and enough freeboard to tell you there is going to be plenty of room below. While the stern section is not substantially different from, for example, the J-120, it is not quite as squatty and did not seem to drag like some (all) J-Boats do. A subtle difference. The cockpit had a pretty slick removable "dockbox" locker just aft of the helmsman - a pretty neat way to quickly go from cruise to race, at least a little bit. The 109 has plenty of high-quality standard equipment; (including Harken winches, adjustable genoa tracks, and RF unit), folding prop. Just in case you forget that it is a racer/cruiser, it even comes with a dodger!

    READ MORE HERE ABOUT SAILING ANARCHY'S REVIEW.

    SAILING WORLD Review

    By Tony Bessinger

    Are you tired of losing races and having lousy cruises with your not-so-dual-purpose boat? Worried about being the first (and last) buyer of a “promising” class that doesn’t quite pan out? Take the fear out of commitment and look at the J/109, a 35-footer that joins the short list of accomplished production-built racer/cruisers. 

    If you haven’t actually seen the J/109 yet, you’re probably wondering how it stacks up with a stablemate that’s nearly the same length, the J/105. “The two boats appeal to different people,” says designer Alan Johnstone. “The 109 is 12 years newer, faster, and is more comfortable for cruising. The 105 is for people who live close to where they keep their boat.” Compared to the 105, the 109 has overlapping headsails and more interior volume, the result of the larger boat’s initial target market. “This boat was originally designed for the European market,” says Jeff Johnstone of J Boats. “The demand there is for a boat that sails well, can comfortably handle a crew living aboard for weekend regattas, and does reasonably well under IRC and IMS.” Reasonably well might be an understatement; the 109 has scored big in Europe since its introduction in 1999, winning the Rolex Middle Sea Race and Cowes Week.

    The J/109 is a tad over 35 feet long, and weighs 10,900 pounds empty. It has a purposeful, racy style, with an almost vertical bow above a waterline-kissing knuckle, and an open stern. The deckhouse is low and long and helps give the boat an overall pleasing look. A carbon sprit housed in a self-draining tube peeks out of the hull just below deckline on the starboard side. The aluminum rig is tall without being freakish, and sports a sailplan that carries a 155-percent jib and an asymmetric runner that, at 1,291 square feet, shouldn’t scare you half to death in a breeze. For windier days, J Boats suggests a flatter, 968-square-foot reaching spinnaker. Total sail area upwind is a healthy 644 square feet.

    READ MORE HERE ABOUT SAILING WORLD'S REVIEW

    J/109 Class News

    J/Fest Southwest Preview : 21-Oct-2017 11am
    J/Fest Southwest Preview
    Celebrating the 40th Anniversary of J/Boats!(Seabrook, TX)- This coming weekend, the waters of Clear Lake and Galveston Bay will come alive again with dozens of J/sailors competing for honors in the 8th annual J/Fest Southwest Regatta, hosted by the always gracious Lakewood YC members.  The event features one-design racing for J/22s, J/24s, J/70s, J/105s (who are also using it as a tune-up/ training regatta for the upcoming J/105 North Americans), J/109s, and two classes of J/PHRF boats ranging from J/27s up to a J/122!As part of celebrating J/Boats’ 40th Anniversary, the kick-off event...
    Read more...
    Awesome Storm Trysail College Big Boat Regatta!
    (Larchmont, NY)– Over 360 college students from the United States, as well as international teams from Canada and France, participated in the 2017 Storm Trysail Foundation’s Intercollegiate Offshore Regatta (IOR).Conditions for the regatta varied between 8-10 knots of breeze on Saturday to a slightly more rugged 18-20 knots with higher gusts on Sunday. Sunday’s more-challenging conditions led to two crew overboard situations. In the first instance, the Grand Valley State crew on the J/109 MORNING GLORY– under the guidance of long-time Storm Trysail Club member and boat owner Carl Olsson - initiated a...
    Read more...
    Windy Hamble Winter Series Regatta
    (Hamble, England)- The first day of the Hamble One Design Championships began with wind in the low 20s, and gusts of up to 30 knots. The Hamble River Sailing Club race committee team headed out to Jonathan Jansen, and after a short AP the wind began to ease to around 16 knots, and the race team delivered a full schedule of four windward-leeward races in short order. The conditions provided spectacular autumn racing for the sportsboat classes, with fast and thrilling downwind surfing conditions. By contrast, the second day produced light winds of...
    Read more...
    Drama-filled Conclusion @ AYC Fall Series
    (Rye, NY)- The American YC’s annual Fall Series that takes place over two weekends at the end of September and start of October always seems to have a combination of benign sailing weather and dramatic storms to round out the experience.  The 2017 series was no exception.  The first weekend produced near pristine sailing conditions on Saturday and much lighter breezes on Sunday- all punctuated by clear skies and sunny days.  The second weekend was anything but that scenario- with Saturday’s weather influenced by the “tail feathers” of Hurricane Maria offshore, producing...
    Read more...
    Hamble Winter Series Kick-Off Weekend!
    (Hamble, England)- The 36th edition of the Hamble Winter Series kicked off on Saturday 30 September, and included the inaugural IRC Spinlock Autumn Championship, organized by the Hamble River Sailing Club.Five races were held for all classes competing in the IRC Spinlock Autumn Championship, and for those competing in the Hamble Winter Series, two races were completed on Sunday 1 October.A wide variety of yachts racing under IRC and in One Designs, enjoyed a perfect southerly wind of 15 knots on Saturday with a 16-18 knot southwesterly intensifying condition on Sunday, typifying fantastic...
    Read more...
    STC College Big Boat Regatta Preview
    (Larchmont, NY)- While American YC’s HPR Regatta will be taking place off Rye, NY, their “next door” neighbors on western Long Island Sound- Larchmont YC- will be hosting what has become the most wildly popular event in the college sailing season across the America’s and Europe!  That is the Storm Trysail Club’s annual Intercollegiate Offshore Regatta (a.k.a. the “college big boat” regatta)! This year’s event will be held on the weekend of October 7th and 8th at the Larchmont Yacht Club in Larchmont, New York. This is an invitational event and will feature...
    Read more...
    J109_spin05

    "Sleeper from Across the Pond"

    The J/109 is turning heads on race courses and in cruising destinations

    SAILING WORLD Review- By Tony Bessinger

    Are you tired of losing races and having lousy cruises with your not-so-dual-purpose boat? Worried about being the first (and last) buyer of a “promising” class that doesn’t quite pan out? Take the fear out of commitment and look at the J/109, a 35-footer that joins the short list of accomplished production-built racer/cruisers.   

    If you haven’t actually seen the J/109 yet, you’re probably wondering how it stacks up with a stablemate that’s nearly the same length, the J/105. “The two boats appeal to different people,” says designer Alan Johnstone. “The 109 is 12 years newer, faster, and is more comfortable for cruising. The 105 is for people who live close to where they keep their boat.” Compared to the 105, the 109 has overlapping headsails and more interior volume, the result of the larger boat’s initial target market. “This boat was originally designed for the European market,” says Jeff Johnstone of J Boats. “The demand there is for a boat that sails well, can comfortably handle a crew living aboard for weekend regattas, and does reasonably well under IRC and IMS.” Reasonably well might be an understatement; the 109 has scored big in Europe since its introduction in 1999, winning the Rolex Middle Sea Race and Cowes Week.

    The J/109 is a tad over 35 feet long, and weighs 10,900 pounds empty. It has a purposeful, racy style, with an almost vertical bow above a waterline-kissing knuckle, and an open stern. The deckhouse is low and long and helps give the boat an overall pleasing look. A carbon sprit housed in a self-draining tube peeks out of the hull just below deckline on the starboard side. The aluminum rig is tall without being freakish, and sports a sailplan that carries a 155-percent jib and an asymmetric runner that, at 1,291 square feet, shouldn’t scare you half to death in a breeze. For windier days, J Boats suggests a flatter, 968-square-foot reaching spinnaker. Total sail area upwind is a healthy 644 square feet.

    The J/109 is built with J Boat’s standard construction method, the SCRIMP (Seemann Composites Resin Infusion Molding Process), which J Boats says, “produces the strongest and most durable production laminates available.” The hull, cored with Baltek’s CK-57-grade balsa and coated with a vinylester barrier beneath the gel coat, is built well enough to pass the American Bureau of Shipping’s scantlings for offshore yachts, and to support a transferable 10-year hull blister warranty. For structural strength there’s a SCRIMP-molded ring frame that shoulders the shroud loads by way of stainless steel tie rods, and a primary bulkhead forward of the mast. A SCRIMP-molded structural grid supports the keel, which is available in shoal- draft or race versions. Both carry an aft-swept, wedge-shaped bulb.

    The cockpit is a crew’s delight, with plenty of room and well-placed sail controls. Part of the feeling of spaciousness comes from the easy removal of the stern locker, a box aft of the helm which doubles as a storage box to be left on the dock during races. Because the traveler is immediately forward of the large Edson wheel, the main trimmer sits close to the driver—a key ingredient to better performance, and nice for shorthanded deliveries.

    All halyards lead back from the mast to clutches and winches on either side of the cabin top. This setup works for shorthanded sailing, too—you can perform most sail-handling duties right from the cockpit. The shrouds and adjustable jib tracks are mounted close to the deckhouse,

     

    which gives the crew an unobstructed deck from cockpit to bow, nice for butts, bare feet, and moving sails. Familiar names grace all the gear: Harken winches, roller-furler gear, traveler, and adjustable jib tracks. Wichard and Spinlock are also well represented.

    One of the big differences between the J/109 and its like-sized relatives, the J/35 and the J/105, is the interior, a space that’s as well conceived as the rest of the boat, with standing headroom throughout the saloon. With two enclosed staterooms and an aft head that’s separate, several of the seven or eight in the race crew can live aboard during weekend regattas, and deliveries will be comfortable.

    There’s plenty of room for sails on the cabin sole once the table is folded down. Settees on either side of the table convert to bunks, and with lee cloths, will be the best bunks in the house for high-side sleeping during distance races. The head is aft of the starboard side nav station and will make a great spot for hanging wet gear. Although the navigator may sometimes wish the head were forward, the placement aft works well for weight distribution and allows the forward cabin spaciousness and privacy. The nav station has an instrument panel that should easily accommodate even the most compulsive instrument junkie; installation and removal of electronics will be easily accomplished.

    The engine, a Yanmar 3 GM30 rated at 27 horsepower, is freshwater cooled via a heat exchanger, has a 100-amp alternator, and is linked to a saildrive unit turning a two-bladed Flex-O-Fold folding prop. The engine’s filters are easily accessible and there’s a fuel gauge in the cockpit; other engine instruments on deck are a tachometer, and alarms for oil, batteries, and engine temperature. The J/109 motors along nicely at 6 knots or so, and isn’t intrusively noisy.

    When we tested the boat, we had a light breeze. We sailed a shoal-draft version of the boat with a 105-percent genoa and felt the boat sailed nicely: the helm was light, the boat showed good speed, and everything in the cockpit came easily to hand. We made a serious attempt to make the boat spin out while sailing on a tight spinnaker reach, but it was nearly impossible. The well-behaved 109 will give its drivers a great deal of confidence on starting lines and mark roundings.

    As mentioned earlier, the J/109 has done well in handicap fleets in Europe, and in the United States (see box), but that doesn’t rule out future one-design racing. With 42 boats sold in the United States at press time, the likelihood of a class forming is high. J Boats plan on taking the one-design class route slowly and carefully, listening to owners before making the rules. PHRF numbers are 72; IMS, 628 GPH with a conventional spinnaker, 611 with asymmetric. The Americap numbers were unavailable.

    A new owner could get a 109 to the racecourse for around $200,000 to $225,000, which is about $50,000 more than a race-ready J/105. With a 109, however, you get a 35-footer designed and built to do everything from beer can to offshore races, to overnight adventures and extended cruises. On top of that, there’s the J Boat family and a boat that will retain its resale value for many years.