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J/Boats Historical Sailing Highlights

2017
The debut of the new J/121 Offshore Speedster was met with critical acclaim and tremendous enthusiasm from the marketplace.  A “revolutionary” boat from the J/Design team produced a unique concept for offshore sailing that was the “right boat at the right time”.  With crew limited to five or less people, water-ballasted, and with all sail-handling systems designed for double-handing, experienced offshore sailors welcomed the simplicity and minimizing logistical challenges associated with 40 footers. The J/121 was awarded SAIL Magazine’s Best Boat “Performance 30 to 40 Feet” category as well as SAILING WORLD’s Boat of the Year “Best Crossover” boat category. The Women’s Keelboat Worlds were again sailed in J/70s, this time in the mountains west of Mexico City on beautiful Valle de Bravo; meanwhile the J/70 Worlds were hosted by YC Costa Smeralda and sailed off Porto Cervo, Sardinia, Italy- the world’s largest sportboat fleet ever with 165 boats registered.  The J/70 Europeans were sailed on the Solent in England, with Italy’s famous woman skipper- Claudia Rossi winning for the second time (she previously won in Kiel, Germany).  The J/70 “sailing leagues” continued to grow and expand in Europe and across the Continent. The J/111s held their fourth World Championship on San Francisco Bay, sailing in epic Bay conditions on the Berkeley Circle and hosted by St Francis YC. Notably, the J/97E won her class in the British J/Cup, in the Round Island Race, Cowes Week, and the Hamble Winter Series.  Also, the J/112E continued here winning ways, taking 2nd in SPI OUEST France, winning J/Cup IRC 1 Class and also the Hamble Winter Series IRC 1 Class by a convincing margin. The J/88s grew as a one-design class in the USA and the United Kingdom.  With spirited racing on both side of the Atlantic.

2016
The debut of the new J/112E Grand Prix Sport Cruiser saw her win class at SPI Ouest France Regatta in La Trinite sur Mer, France and the famous Grand Prix du Crouesty.  J/112E also won SAIL Magazine’s “Best Performance Boat Over 30 Ft” and won SAILING WORLD’s Boat of the Year “Best Crossover Boat Category”. The introduction of the J/122E version of the famous J/122 was also met with critical acclaim.  Plus, she also performed on the water, winning the Dutch Double-handed Championship as well as taking 2nd in the RORC Fastnet Race Doublehanded Class.  Yes, it is possible to marry comfort with speed as the Dutch AJETO team proved over the course of a season of sailing offshore.  Out West in America, the J/122E JOYRIDE also garnered her fair share of silverware in major offshore races in the Pacific Northwest. J/Boats co-founders, Bob and Rod Johnstone, were honored by the Mystic Seaport Museum- garnering the “American & the Sea Award”; they were also honored by the USA National Sailing Hall of Fame as 2016 inductees. The J/70 phenomenon continued, with growing momentum in places like South America (Chile, Argentina, Brazil) and in Europe, especially.  The “sailing league” concept has now taken over the Continent- with over 100+ events taking place in Finland, Sweden, Norway, Switzerland, Russia, Denmark, The Netherlands, England, France, Italy, Germany, and Monaco…500+ sailing clubs participate with over 5,000 sailors.  The J/70s held their third World Championship on breezy, cool San Francisco Bay, hosted by St Francis YC. The Women’s Keelboat Worlds were hosted for the first time in J/70s on western Long Island Sound, hosted by American YC in Rye, New York. A number of J/teams participate in the first two yacht races to Havana, Cuba- one from Miami, the other from Key West, Florida. J/111s held their third World Championship on the Solent, hosted by the Island Sailing Club in Cowes, England- a very windy series.  The J/88 class continued to evolve with great racing at Key West, Youngstown’s CanAm Regatta, AYC Spring/Fall Series, Block Island, Charleston Race Week, and their first North American Championship at American YC in Rye, NY.

2015  
The J/70 explosion continues with 900+ boats delivered worldwide by year-end, and the first Worlds in European waters (LaRochelle, FRA). The Sailing League phenomenon spreads across Europe, featuring the J/70, and culminates in the Champions League finale held at Yacht Club Costa Smeralda in Porto Cervo, Italy. The J/111 Class celebrates its 2nd World Championship in Newport, RI and 25% of the world’s J/111s attend.  George Gamble and teamaboard My Sharona prevail in the 25 boat fleet. The new J/11S, a purpose-built 36’ double-handed, offshore racer is launching in LaRochelle, France. J/122 “Artie” wins second Rolex Middle Sea Race in a row this time it’s Class 5 and both IRC and ORC.  J/122 has now won it’s class three years in a row. The J/88 class kicks off with racing at Key West, Hamble, UK and the inaugural Great Lakes and New England Championship held in Youngstown, NY and Greenwich, CT respectively. The first ever electric powered J/Boat is launched with the J/88 Oceanvolt SEA at the Newport Boat Show along with the brand new J/122E and J/97E built by J/Composites.  The new "E" range with brighter interiors and modern styling is joined by the all-new 36' J/112E sport cruiser launched in November and sea-trialed in Narragansett Bay. 

2014   
J/122 “Artie” wins Rolex Middle Sea Race Overall in both IRC and ORC.  Sistership J/122 Otra Vez follows up 2013 win with a second in class. The J/88 wins Sailing World’s Boat of the Year “Best Overall One-Design” and one week later is announced as Yachts & Yachting Boat of the Year at the London Boatshow.  J/88 is the January cover girl for Sailing World Magazine and   production begins in France to meet demand in Europe. The new International J/111 Class holds its first ever World Championship in Cowes, England and hosted by the Royal Yacht Squadron. J/70 growth explodes at the grass roots level with fleets developing across the USA, Europe, South America and elsewhere. By year end over 700 J/70s are sailing worldwide with event highlights including the Sportboat Winter Series at the Monaco Yacht Club, a new European J/70 Circuit, the North Americans at Rochester Yacht Club, and the inaugural World Championship in Newport, Rhode Island. J/70 production for the Asian market begins at McConaghy Boats in China. J/70 is awarded Sweden’s Boat of the Year by the Swedish yachting press.  German Sailing League takes off with the J/70 at the heart of this success.  Denmark follows suit with the Danish Sailing League. J/122 El Ocaso wins class at the Heineken Regatta and “Most Worthy Performance Overall” trophy. The new J/97E sport cruiser is introduced at the Southampton Show as a model year upgrade of the J/97 with a redesigned cockpit to accommodate a wheel option along with J/122E inspired styling. J/133 Wins the RORC Trans-Atlantic Race from the Canary Islands to Grenada in the Caribbean. The J/24 Worlds comes “home” to Newport, Rhode Island, site of the first Worlds held in 1979.  Will Wells of the USA prevails over 70 boats representing 12+ countries. Red Dragon Yachts of Xiamen, China begins J/80 production for the Asian market. The J/80 is the featured boat in the 2014 Inter-Collegiate Sailing Worlds in France and World Championship heads to Annapolis, MD in September.

2013
The J/70 hits center stage with an incredible 60 boats at it’s first Midwinter Championship in Key West, nine months after Hull #1 launched. J/70 is voted Best Performance Boat by Yachts and Yachting Magazine… “The Clear Winner” The J/70 is named European Yacht of the Year under the Special Yachts category, after swaying the judging panel with a flawless showing over several test days. 91 boats compete for first North American Championship in Annapolis with Heather Gregg Earl and her team winning against a very competitive fleet of sailors. J/70 Awarded International One Design Status by ISAF. Hugo Rocha of Portugal tops a 117 boat fleet to win the J/80 Worlds in Marseilles, France.  J/80 hull #1500 competes. The new 29’ J/88 Speedster is launched in late July. J/120 wins Pineapple Cup from Miami to Montego Bay Jamaica. J/97 one design action heats up in the UK and J/97 is class winner at RORC IRC Nationals and the 2013 Scottish Series. J/111 Class has break-out year with first Euro Cup held in La Trinite, France and first North American Championship in Chicago. J/122 “Otra Vez” & J/133 “Oiltanking Juno” win respective IRC classes at 2013 Rolex Middle Sea Race with J/133 taking first under ORC as well. The new J/122E Sport Cruiser debuts at Grand Pavois Boatshow in La Rochelle France. J/42 “CEOL MOR“ completes global circumnavigation.

2012
This year may well go down in history as one of J's better years on record. The big news was the successful launch of the J/70. The first pair of J/70s launched in March with a record number of 100+ boats ordered before its maiden voyage, a feat un-equalled in J/Boats history. And, it was chosen for New York Yacht Club's US Qualifying Series for a fleet of dozen boats, plus its second one-design regatta was held in Annapolis, MD with DIESEL winning over 24 other boats. By end of the year, over 300 boats are on order and 40 boats are sailing Key West Race Week in January 2013. J/111 is VOILES Magazine's BOAT OF THE YEAR 2012 and it's chosen YACHTS & YACHTING'S READER'S YACHT OF THE YEAR! J/111s win Sydney, Australia's Short Ocean Series (JAKE), take 2nd at Key West Race Week (MENTAL), win IRC class in Warsash Spring Series (J-DREAM), win IRC Class in North Sea Regatta (XCENTRIC RIPPER), are 1-2-3 in PHRF B in Charleston Race Week (WICKED 2.0/ FLEETWING/ VELOCITY), wins Marstrand Big Boat Race in IRC Class (BLUR), wins epic Round Island Race in IRC Class (J-DREAM), take 9 of top 10 in Chicago-Mackinac Race ORR Handicap OVERALL (first time ever by any class of boat) and KASHMIR is awarded the Mackinac Trophy as Overall Winner, wins Bayview-Mackinac Race PHRF C class (NO SURPRISE), wins Nova Scotia Opener Regatta in Halifax, wins Bayview Regatta in Detroit, wins Tri-State Race Overall (MENTAL), 1st overall PHRF Class in Chester Race Week- Nova Scotia (BLAST), is third overall in Tjorn-Runt Race in Sweden (BLUR III sailing in largest race in Sweden with 436 boats!), wins Nova Scotia Offshore Championship overall (BLAST) and wins Netherlands IRC Championship Overall (J-XCENTRIC RIPPER). J/111's sail one-design at SPI Ouest France Regatta, Cowes Race Week, Chicago-Mackinac Race, Verve Cup, Chicago SW NOOD Regatta, Annapolis SW NOOD Regatta, Ugotta Regatta/ Harbor Springs, Vice Admiral's Cup and GARMIN Hamble Winter Series. J/145 wins San Diego YC's "Yacht of the Year 2011" (BAD PAK) for her epic offshore racing success and takes PHRF A in the Newport-Ensenada Race (RADIO FLYER). J/133 JIVARO wins Tour de Belle'Ile off La Trinite sur Mer, France over 600+ boats and HOT WATER smokes IRC Canadian Championship. J/125s crush Puerto Vallarta and Cabo Races, DOUBLE TROUBLE "three-peats" Spinnaker Cup and Big Boat Series in San Francisco, California, and DOUBLE TROUBLE crushes TransPac Pacific Cup overall. J/122s continue to win, taking Key West Race Week PHRF A (TEAMWORK), wins Corsica Race in IRC (650nm sailed by CHRISTINA III), wins Block Island Race and STC Stamford-Vineyard Race (CHRISTOPHER DRAGON), takes 3rd in St Tropez 900 Race (900nm sailed by NOISY OYSTER), 1st & 2nd in US IRC Championships (WINGS & CHRIS DRAGON), 2nd class in RORC North Sea Race, win Rolex Middle Sea Race IRC Class (ARTIE RTFX) again, win Garmin Hamble Winter Series IRC 1 (JOLOU) and in Australia (LITHIUM). The J/120 EL OCASO does another "Caribbean Tour" and walks off with every major regatta, winning class at St Maarten, Rolex St Thomas, BVI and Antigua Race Weeks.  J/109s and J/105 sweep Round Ireland 700nm race overall and in IRC 3 class; sweep IRC 2 Class at CORK Week in Cork, Ireland; and sweep French Pornic Cup Race to Gijon, Spain. J/97s continue their winning ways, taking Warsash Spring Series IRC class, Cowes Week IRC Class, Scottish Race Week, 2nd in Garmin Hamble Winter Series, SAILING FOR JESUS wins class in the Hermano Runt in Sweden and KNOCKABOUT wins in Sydney, Australia. In the one-design world, the J/105 class continues to expand into South America and is growing in Chile with its first South American Championships off Algarrobo, Chile on the Pacific coast. And, J/105s had an unprecedented four regattas in a row in Southern California, with San Diego YC hosting the Southern California Championships, North American Championships, International Masters Championship and the Lipton Cup in October/November-- the first two events featured new J/105 owner- Mr America's Cup- Dennis Conner! The J/22 Worlds were sailed in Le Crouesty, France and won by a Frenchman (Jean Queveau) for the first time ever. The J/24 Worlds had a record turn-out in Rochester, New York (over 100 boats) with Brazilian Mauricio Santa Cruz winning an unprecedented fourth worlds (just one away from Ken Read's famous mark of five J/24 Worlds!). The J/80 Worlds were sailed in Dartmouth, England and the Spanish teams, yet again, sweep with Jose Maria van der Ploeg on NILFISK winning. The J/80s also hosted the World Police Sailing Championships in Hong Kong, China.

2011
As the world economy continued to bounce along and slowly improve, the prospects for J sailors continually improved.  The successful introduction of the J/111 led to world-acclaim and to some remarkable performances offshore.  For starters, the J/111 KONTIKI V wins Key West Race Week in PHRF A; INVISIBLE HAND was 2nd in ORR Class D and 3rd in fleet in Cabo Race (after winning most of the race!); VELOCITY gets 2nd in Charleston Race Week PHRF B; SHMOKING JOE wins IRC Class in its maiden voyage on the famous Round Island Race and 5th overall in 450 boat IRC Class (the famous America's Cup Course around the Isle of Wight- England); JAKE wins its maiden voyage in Sydney, Australia in the Short Offshore Points Series; J/111s win both the Chicago-Mackinac Race (KASHMIR) in class and sweep the Bayview-Mackinac Race (NO SURPRISE); and J/111 gets third overall in the RORC Fastnet Race Double-handed Class (J-XCENTRIC was winning with 100 meters to go at the finish line, but wind died and they "parked" for 7 hours before finishing!).  The J/145 BAD PAK gets 2nd class C and 4th in fleet in the Cabo Race, later wins the Ensenada Race and also the TransPac Race in Division 4!  J/145 also wins Hong Kong- San Fernando Race to the Phillipines. J/122s continued their winning ways, taking the Fastnet Race IRC 2 class (the French NUTMEG IV) and, for the 3rd time, wins the Storm Trysail Club's Stamford-Vineyard Race (CHRISTOPHER DRAGON) and again takes the IRC East Coasts in Annapolis, Maryland (CATAPULT)!  The J/109 wins Double-handed Farallones Race off San Francisco, the Vancouver Isle 360 Race of 800nm+ off Vancouver, BC, the Lake Ontario 300 race (300nm) and the Bayview-Mackinac Race-- plus it's the Irish IRC Boat of the Year!  The J/97 wins SPI Ouest France and JIKA-JIKA wins Cowes Week and J/97 is also selected RORC's IRC Boat of the Year!  In the one-design world, the J/22 Women's Worlds sailed in Rochester, New York was won by local sailor Cory Sertl.  The J/22 Worlds sailed in New Orleans, is won by Rob Johnston from Heath, Texas.  The J/24 Worlds were sailed in Buenos Aires, Argentina and won by the Argentinean Team LUCA with skipper Alejo Rigoni.  And, in the J/24 Pan Am Games, past J/24 World Champion Mauricio Santa Cruz from Brazil wins the Gold Medal.  The J/80 Worlds were held in Copenhagen, Denmark with Spanish teams sweeping the top three, again, with Ignacio Camino winning a second time on NEXTEL ENGINEERING.  And, the J/80 North Americans were again won by Glenn Darden on LE TIGRE.  Plus, J/80 wins BEST SAILBOAT AWARD UNDER 40 FEET at the Shanghai China Boatshow. 

2010
The year of 2010 was characterized by an on-going recession worldwide, but unlike its competitors in the sailing industry, the J/Team continued to execute and expand the business worldwide. Two more new models were launched in 2010- the J/111 one-design speedster and the J/108 shoal performance cruiser. The J/111 was launched in August by CCF Composites in Bristol, Rhode Island and after a successful fall boatshow circuit in Newport and Annapolis, it garners the SAILING WORLD BOAT OF THE YEAR "Best One-Design Keelboat" Award and SAIL Magazine BEST BOATS AWARD - Performance Category-- the second year in a row that a J/Design has won the category!  The J/108 was launched in October in Les Sables d'Olonne, France by JB Composites, the next generation of performance, shoal-draft cruising boats in the line after the successful introduction of the J/95.  In the offshore sailing world, the J/122s win both racing divisions in the Chicago-Mackinac Race, the first and only time that feat has ever been accomplished, with FLYING JENNY IV winning the Mackinac Trophy Overall and SKYE winning the Double-handed Division.  J/122s repeat winning the Storm Trysail Club Stamford-Vineyard Race Overall, the IRC East Coasts in Annapolis and the Rolex Middle Sea Race off Malta.  Plus, the J/122s were winning in Australia, winning the IRC 1 Class offshore in Sydney Harbour series.  The classic J/125s win Key West Race Week, Coastal Cup off California and the Cabo Race to Mexico.  And, the Queen of the J/Fleet, the J/65 BRAND NEW DAY wins Bermuda Race Class serving home-cooked meals with red wine and cold white wine from the on-board wine cooler each night and sailing in air-conditioned comfort "off-watch" below decks!  In the one-design world, the Americans re-assert their domination atop the J/24 class with American Tim Healy winning the J/24 Worlds in Malmo, Sweden (America's Cup sailor Ed Baird last won it there in 1981!).  A number of J/80 regattas in France and Spain affected by the monstrous volcanic ash cloud that swept across Europe in April, affecting traffic everywhere.  This didn't stop the Spanish from, again, winning a very windy, epic J/80 Worlds in Newport, RI with Spaniard Pichu Torcida taking it for a second time! 

2009
The year of 2009 was marked by a continuing, persistent economic climate that bordered on "heavy recession", particularly in North America and Europe. The Asian and South American markets maintained a relative degree of prosperity by comparison. Nevertheless, 2009 was a remarkable year for the J/Team worldwide. For the first time ever, J/Boats introduced three new models in one year- the J/95 and J/97 in the spring and the J/111 in the fall. Launched in April in Bristol, Rhode Island by CCF Composites, the J/95 was the first shoal-draft performance cruising sailboat ever launched by J/Boats. With twin-rudders, wheel-steering and a fully-functioning keel-centerboard, the J/95 broke new ground. And, it won a lot of hearts, selling nearly two dozen boats by year-end and winning the first "triple-crown" of sailing industry awards ever-- the CRUISING WORLD BOAT OF THE YEAR, the SAILING WORLD BOAT OF THE YEAR and the SAIL BEST BOATS "Performance Cruising" Category.  In the first weekend of May, the performance IRC cruiser-racer J/97 was launched by JB Composites in Les Sables d'Olonne, France. The J/97 open, innovative interior design, aft head, six foot standing headroom and sleeping for six made it an immediate success in the European market. J/97 quickly demonstrated its capabilities offshore, sweeping its class in Cowes Week in August.  Later in the fall, the somewhat revolutionary J/111 was first announced to the world and by year-end over 25 boats had been sold-- the most successful launch of a new 35 foot boat ever by J/Boats!  On the sailing front, the J/122 J-BELLINO sailed by Rob Craigie from England wins the 2009 OSTAR. Plus, the J/105 KING OF SHAVES sailed by Oscare Meade was 2nd his class and youngest finisher ever in this 2,900nm race. The J/122s continued to win many offshore contests, including a three-peat in the Chicago-Mackinac Race. The J/122 SKYE led a sweep of the Chicago-Mac Double-handed Division, with a J/35 and J/29 coming in 2nd and 3rd, respectively! Other big J's continued to perform as well, with the J/133 BATFISH taking the RORC Offshore Season Points Championship Overall!  In the one-design world, the balance of power in the major J one-design classes had clearly moved away from the Americans. J/24s held their Worlds in Annapolis in May with Brazilian Mauricio Santa Cruz winning his 3rd Worlds title. The J/22 Worlds were held on Lago di Garda, Italy in June and the Dutch teams from the Netherlands swept all top three spots. The J/80s had a record 133 boats for their Worlds in Santander, Spain in July which saw all top three spots swept by the Spanish teams.

2008
Despite the economy slowing down, it was another great year of sailing for J owners. Starting with Key West, good turnouts for the J/80, J/105 and J/109s all hosting their Midwinters. Of the six handicap divisions that included at least one J Boat (5 PHRF divisions and 1 IRC division), J owners dominated the leader board, winning 44% of the top three class trophies. Experienced offshore sailor Ned Cabot recently published a story of the latest adventure aboard his J/46 ‘Cielita’ in Ocean Navigator magazine (Jan/Feb ’08 issue). The J/24 celebrated its 30th birthday at the J/24 Midwinters with 42 teams sailing a tough 11 race, no throw-out series- brothers Waldek and Chris Zaleski aboard TWINS won-- they also won the J/24 Nationals later in the year! 32 J/109s had a fun time sailing the J/UK J/109 Nationals. For the STC Bermuda Race, J owners turned out in record numbers and represented 22% of the 210 boat fleet - the first time J has surpassed Swan (14%) for the most popular brand/design in a Bermuda Race. And, J owners made the most of it. 52% of the top 25 overall finishers sailing IRC were J’s, and owners collected 26% of the top three places in all divisions and overall combined. Andrea Casale of Italy won the J/24 World Championship with 76 boats and an incredible 17 countries represented. Philippe Delaporte’s J/122 PEN AZEN was named the 2008 Yacht of the Year by the Royal Ocean Racing Club, dominating the IRC Classes in most all events. This success in IRC was repeated by the J/122 TKO winning Rolex Big Boat Series in San Francisco. Greg Fisher of Annapolis, MD won the J/22 World Championship in Rochester, NY over a record 103 sailing teams. Over in the Mediterranean, the J/133 CHESTRESS won IRC Class 3 and a 2nd Overall in the 2008 Rolex Middle Sea Race. 8 teams from 8 countries sailed the first International J/80 Invitational Regatta in Xiamen, China-- the first ever J/80 one-design event in the Pacific Rim

2007
A record year for J/Boat owners with major offshore racing wins across the US and Europe. The introduction of the new J/122 built by J/Europe taking the IRC circuit in France, the UK, the Netherlands and the USA by storm achieving several overall wins both inshore and offshore. J/Boat owners are class and overall champions of numerous offshore events including Ft. Lauderdale-Key West Race, Pineapple Cup, Bayview Mac Race, Annapolis-Newport Race, Charleston Bermuda Race, Transpac, Chicago Mac, and several RORC offshore races. J/133 is awarded “Best Series Produced Yacht” and J/122 wins IRC 1 class overall for the entire season in the 2007 RORC series. J/80 production races by the 1,000 hull milestone with over 1050 boats built. A record 120 J/80s sail at the World Championships in La Trinite France. The J/105 Class sets attendance records on both US coasts culminating in a 69 boat fleet at the North American Champs in Annapolis. J/105 also wins RORC 2-handed season trophy. J/109 class activity thrives in the US and UK. Clay Burkhalter successfully sails his Rod Johnstone designed Mini 6.5 ‘Acadia’ across the Atlantic from France to Brazil finishing 12th overall out of 89 entries. The J/80 debuts at the Asian Sportboat Championship placing 1st and 2nd overall. J/Europe increases factory capacity by 40% thanks to increasing demand worldwide for new J/Boats. Several J/Owners actively engaged cruising their boats through the oceans of the world. Congratulations to J/Owners for an incredible year!

2006
The J/92S makes its USA debut. The J/100 reaches 100 boat milestone and production begins in Europe. New 40’ J/122 development begins with J/Europe. J/ owners win 12 trophies in the Centennial Newport to Bermuda Race with the J/44 and J/42 classes the largest in the fleet. Glenn Darden captures the J/80 World title in Galveston Bay, TX, while fellow Texan Jon Halbert wins the inaugural J/109 North American Championships at New York Yacht Club. J/109 and double-handed J/105 finish 1-2 in Rolex Middle Sea Race. The York family completes a circumnavigation aboard their J/46 Aragorn. The J/22 North Americans returns to Fleet #1 Lake Minnetonka, MN with Terry Flynn crowned champion. The J/80 reaches 900 boat milestone and new fleets are established in Spain & Italy. The J/105 is awarded the Serendip Trophy for the Best Series-Produced Yacht in IRC by RORC for 2006 and Shaun Murphy’s Slingshot is named RORC 2006 Yacht of the Year and wins the Somerset Memorial Trophy for outstanding achievement of a 2-handed yacht. The J/122 is introduced and displayed at the Paris Show to rave reviews with a December launch in Hamble, UK and successful sea-trials.

2005
The new J/65 launches in San Diego. Scotsman Ruairidh Scott wins the Silva J/80 Worlds in Falmouth, UK. The J/105 class sets new milestones with a 40 boat fleet at Key West and the first Canadian hosting of a North American Championship. The J/100 rolls out of the factory at nearly 2 boats per week to meet the high demand. The J/133 notches impressive IRC class wins at Spi Ouest and Block Island Race Week. The rapidly growing J/109 class sees one-design starts at Spi Ouest, Block Island and Cowes Week. Anthony Kotoun of Newport, RI wins the J/24 Worlds in Weymouth, England and the J/24 North Americans in Marblehead, MA. The new J/92S, a family-friendly sprit boat with large cockpit and non-overlapping headsail launches in Europe. J/125 'Rienrag' takes class honors again in the Transpac. Sally Barkow wins the Rolex Int’l Women’s Keelboat Champs in J/22s in Annapolis, and the Women's Match Racing Worlds in J/24's in Bermuda. Henry Morgan, sailing his J/42 'Dolphin', wins the Annapolis-Bermuda Race fleet. Short-handed J-sailors celebrate as Pascal Loison wins the 2-Handed Rolex Fastnet Race in his J/105 and Sam and Gordon Vineyard win Marion- to Bermuda Race in their J/46. The new J/124, a 41’ follow-up sensation to the J/100, launches in Rhode Island.

2004
The J/133 Raincloud wins its debut regatta at Key West and production begins in both the US and France. J109s sweep IRC 4 at Spi Ouest, the UK J/109 Jeronimo is on the winning team of the Rolex Commodore’s Cup, and the J/109 class gets underway with 11 fleets formed, a class website and several class events held. Alec Cutler wins the J/22 Worlds in Annapolis over a fleet of 130 boats, an all-time J attendance record! Three J’s (J/35, J/46 and J/160) set sail in the 2004 Blue Water World Rally. The new J/100 (33’) is launched in Newport to rave reviews, is named Sailing World Magazine’s Overall Boat of the Year, and quickly reaches a six month backlog. J/145s enjoy class wins in the Newport to Bermuda and Port Huron-Mackinac races. Dave McConaughy wins the 25th Anniversary J/30 North Americans in Barrington, RI. Glen Darden of TX wins both the J/80 North Americans in Sag Harbor, NY and the 52 boat J/105 North Americans in Marion, MA. Wow! Jens Hookanson outduels Jeff Johnstone on the last leg of the final race to win the J/24 Worlds in Noroton, CT. The new J/65 (65‘) is announced as J Boats’ entry into the luxury performance sailing market with a custom bay set up at Pearson Composites and a highly anticipated 05 launching.

2003
The J/24 class celebrates its Silver 25th Anniversary in Newport, while the J/35 class has its 20th in Toronto with 27 boats racing for the North American Championship. The J/105 class continues to set attendance records and is the only class present at all 9 NOOD Regattas. Dr. Mike Finn’s J/160 ‘Kativa’ wins the Charleston to Bermuda Race; J/125 'Rienrag' that takes line and class honors for Division 3 in the Tranpac. J/42 owners create a new owner association. J/Boats continue to thrive under IRC with J/145 winning the Overall IRC Season Championship in UK (1-2 in class at Fastnet), and the J/109 winning its class at Fastnet as well as at Cowes and Spi Ouest. J/Europe is formed as new European builder (France). Jay Lutz wins J/80 Worlds in Fort Worth Texas as class breaks the hull #600 barrier. Sally Barkow wins the Rolex Women’s Keelboat Champs in J/22s in Annapolis. J/133 is awarded the Overall Boat of the Year award by Sailing World Magazine and Best Performance Cruiser by Cruising World.

2002
J/109 results roll in all year with wins at Spi-Ouest, Cowes Week, Breskens Race Week, Double-handed Round Britain Race and the prestigious Atlantic Trophy. J/109 plugs are shipped to the US and TPI begins production. ISAF selects the J/22 (women’s keelboat division) and J/80 (men’s keelboat division) for the World Sailing Games in Marseilles. J/105 explosion continues with 50 boats at the North Americans in Chicago, hull #600 built, and selected for UBS Challenge Pro Match-Racing. J/80 earns class start at Kiel Week and J/80 Worlds are held in La Rochelle, France. The J/Fest Regatta Series goes national with sponsors and five great events. Brad Read wins J/24 Worlds on its return to Newport. J/109 and J/105 are 1st and 2nd overall in Rolex Middle Sea Race. Terry Flynn wins 60-boat J/22 Worlds in Texas.

2001
J/145 is selected as a Sail Magazine Top 10 winner and wins class at Key West. J/80 class hosts its first World Championships in Newport. J Boats introduces the 35’ J/109 in Europe. Waterline Systems begins building J/22s, helping to revitalize J/22 class growth. J/130 BONKERS is overall winner in the Pineapple Cup race to Jamaica. J/160s win in Newport-Ensenada, Puerto-Vallarta, Marblehead-Halifax and Swiftsure races. J/125 wins overall at Middle Sea Race in Malta. The Rolex Int’l Women’s Keelboat Champs is held in J22s in Annapolis, with Cory Sertl’s team crowned champion.

2000
J/46 earns double honors, first as a Sail Magazine Top 10 winner; and as a category winner in Sailing World Magazine's Boat of the Year Awards. New carbon fiber J/145 (48') is launched. 92 boats attend the J/22 Worlds in Holland. J/105 production accelerates with hull #400 launched and European production underway. Waterline Systems becomes new US builder for J/24 and the World Championship returns to Newport for its 22nd running. New "L" version (L for liveaboard) is introduced for the popular J/42.

1999
J/35 inducted into the American Sailboat Hall of Fame ceremonies in Atlantic City. J/125 wins "Sportboat of the Year" from Sailing World. J/120 J BIRD clean sweeps the Puerta-Vallarta race with 1st to finish, 1st in class and 1st overall- only the 3rd boat in history to do so (other two were 70' sleds). J/46 performance-cruising yacht is launched. J/22 featured in Santa-Maria Cup (women's match racing) and for the ISAF Women's Match Racing Worlds. J/30 and J/35 classes combine efforts to run their 20th and 15th North American Championships in Annapolis. 25 J/105s sail one design at Block Island. Over 275 J/105s now sailing in 15 fleets worldwide. The Rolex Int'l Women's Keelboat Champs return to Newport in J/24s.

1998
J/160 PIPEDREAM wins Round-the-World Rally (American division) with a crew of five. Owner Scott Piper departs on cruise around the world in opposite direction! High tech built J/90 and J/125 usher in new wave of technology - carbon composite construction with 50% ballast/displacement ratios. J/90 wins "Sportboat of the Year" from Sailing World. J/125 wins at Block Island Race Week and St. Francis Big Boat Series. J/120s sweep top 3 spots in Newport to Ensenada Race. J/22 featured in ISAF World Championship in Dubai for women's match-racing and fleet disciplines. US Master's Championship held in J/105s in San Francisco. J/80 becomes fastest growing one-design in Sweden with 20 boats sailing. J/120 reaches hull #100, with 28 boats sailing in Southern California.

1997
100 J/24s attend the 20th anniversary J/24 Midwinters in Key West, Florida. Johnstone Family receives The Industry Leadership Award from SAIL Magazine. Harry Smith wins 1100nm Marina Del Rey to Puerto-Vallarta Race on his J/160 'Bushwacker' and J/160 Hull #3 PIPEDREAM begins the 'Round the World Rally'. The Moorings Company purchases a fleet of J/120s for an innovative "race weeks" charter program in Tortola.

1996
The first two of six J/160s are launched in early May. These deluxe flagships go on to win several offshore point-to-point races including a course record from Annapolis to Bermuda! J/44 Class returns for the 1996 Bermuda Race in force with 11 starters. J/105 reaches critical mass for class racing throughout the US with over 165 boats numerous regional events and a successful North American Championship. The new production J/32 Cruiser, designed by Alan Johnstone, is launched in July with over 20 sold in the first six months. J/Boats web site is expanded with a growing on-line class association presence, owner forums and monthly updates.

1995
J/120 named Cruising World Magazine's Overall Boat-of-the-Year and Best Value in a Full-Size Cruiser. J/24 is first of five inductees into the American Sailboat Hall of Fame. J/130 STARLIGHT EXPRESS takes line honors in Newport-Ensenada Race. New J/42 Cruiser is introduced. Hull #1 GANNET wins two New York Yacht Club events and Class A Downeast Racing Circuit with a cruising asymmetric spinnaker and short-handed crew. J/35 class rebounds in participation with 35 entries at its North American Championship. J/105s are featured on ESPN in the Brut Cup professional match-racing circuit. J Composite of France begins European production of the J/80 and J/92.

1994
J/130 named Sailing World's Boat-of-the-Year among Racer-Cruisers. J/22 & J/24 selected for inaugural IYRU World Sailing Championships, J/44 is first one-design class ever given start in Bermuda Race. J/120 introduced at SAIL EXPO with carbon mast and wins New England Solo-Twin. J/110 introduced at Annapolis Boat Show.

1993
J/92 is Sailing World's Overall Boat-of-the-Year. J/80 One-Design is launched- the first J model to be built with TPI's patented SCRIMP molding technology. J/22 celebrates its 10th anniversary by becoming an IYRU International Class with 1200 boats. J/33 DAYBREAK overall winner of Chicago-Mackinac. Newly launched J/130 and J92 sweep Andaman Sea Race in Asia.

1992
J/105 becomes Sailing World's Boat-of-the-Year among racer-cruisers, and ushers in the sport boat revolution. J/92 is introduced and destined for the 1992 Readers Choice Award from Sailing World. J/24 #5000 and J/35 #300 are launched. Rod Johnstone is inducted into the Sailing World Hall of Fame.

1991
Nick Brown's J/44 IONA wins Fastnet in IMS. Fortune Magazine names J Boats as one of the world's 100 best American made products. J/39s and J/35s sweep top 4 positions in CHS at Cowes Week. J Boats pioneers carbon-fiber retractable bowsprits and asymmetric spinnakers on offshore boats, introducing the first of its new "sprit" series, the J/105.

1990
J/35c named Sailing World's Boat-of-the-Year among 30-35 footers. J/44 wins NYYC Cruise. Motor Boating & Sailing names J/24 as 1 of 2 best sailboats of all time. New J/39 wins MBYC Fall Series. J/35 wins class in Sydney-Hobart Race. J/44 J-HAWK wins CHS class at Cowes Week.

1989
New J/44 wins New York Yacht Club Queen's Cup and Cowes Week on way to becoming Sailing World's Overall Boat-of-the-Year.

1988
J/34c named Sailing World's Boat-of-the-Year. New J/33 wins Class at Block Island Race Week. Jeff, Stuart, Drake, & Alan Johnstone commence management of company operations at J/Boat office in Newport, RI. TPI (J Builder) introduces industry-leading 10 year blister warranty.

1987
J/35 becomes America's fastest growing big-boat one-design with 24 sailing in Class at Block Island. J/37s win Class in 3 major race weeks.

1986
J/40 named Sailing World's Boat-of-the-Year among US designs. J/35 is lst Overall in Miami-Montego Bay and New England Solo-Twin. J/28 and J/37 Cruisers introduced.

1985
Charley Scott's J/41 SMILES wins SORC Overall. J boats introduces it's first purpose built cruising boat, the J/40, that then goes on to win Class in Chicago -Mackinac. J/34 becomes best selling IOR design in America.

1984
New J/27 is overall winner of MORC Internationals with J/29 winning Class A. J/35 is 1st Overall MHS in Chicago - Mackinac. J/41 has 1-2-3 sweep of One Ton North Americans and Bermuda Race class.

1983
J/22 and J/35 introduced. J/22 wins Class at MORC Internationals.

1982
New J/29s finish 1-2-3 to sweep Class in Block Island Race Week

1981
Stu, Drake & Jeff Johnstone start J/World Performance Sailing School. J/36 Wins Class A in Antigua.

1980
Nissan Motors becomes Japanese builder. J/24 wins Caribbean Ocean Racing Circuit, becomes IYRU International Class and named by SAIL (10th Anniversary) as "best keelboat in 30 years."

1979
J/30 #1 WARHOOP finishes 3rd in SORC Class. First J/24 Worlds in Newport with 78 boats.

1978
20 boats attend first J/24 one-design event at Key West. 68 boats attend North Americans in Newport. 1000 boats are sold with builders set up in UK, Brazil, Argentina, Australia and US West Coast where Trask family joins Johnstones to build J/24's.

1977

Brothers Bob and Rod Johnstone finish 1-2 in J/24s in MORC Division at Block Island Week. J/24s go on to dominate the MORC Internationals in Annapolis.

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J/Boats: Sailing to Success

The story of J/Boats is a classic entrepreneurial tale: With a $20,000 investment, and a speedy 24-foot sailboat that Rod Johnstone built in his garage, Rod & his brother Bob Johnstone went into business. That was 1977. Now, that boat (the J/24), has become the most popular recreational offshore keelboat in the world. The Johnstone family has made an undeniable mark on the sailing world. In addition to the 5,400 J/24s cruising the waves, there are over 7,000 more J/Boats, ranging from the International J/22 to the J/65, that sailing enthusiasts have bought at prices ranging from $10,000 to $2,000,000.

While other manufacturers may sell more boats, the Johnstones have won the high-end, performance-oriented segment of the market. Theirs is the so-called racer/cruiser category: boats that perform well on the race course but which are comfortable and easy enough for the family to daysail and cruise. It is with knowledgeable, experienced sailors that the Johnstones have done best.

The story begins in 1975. Rod, then an ad salesman for the sailing trade magazine, Soundings, and an active one-design sailor decided to build a sailboat he had been designing since completing a Westlawn School of Yacht Design correspondence course in the 60's. With $400-worth of fiberglass and wood, some rigging and hardware left over from a Soling of Bob's, he built the 24' x 9' wide RAGTIME on weekends in his 3 car garage at his home in Stonington, Connecticut. During the summer of 1976, with an all family crew aboard, RAGTIME beat everything in sight. Rod realized he had created something special.

Enter Everett Pearson, the owner of Tillotson Pearson, Inc, a highly respected boat builder in Warren Rhode Island. He was quite taken with Rod's design and agreed to produce the boat on spec in return for the U.S. building rights. Display ads in Soundings got the word out. That winter they set up a makeshift factory in an old textile mill in nearby Fall River, Massachusetts, and began popping out J/24s.

Enter the marketing experience of brother Bob, a vice president of marketing at AMF/Alcort (the makers of Sunfish sailboats at the time). He saw the potential in the boat Rod had designed. From 1975 to 1977, Bob had helped to take Alcort from the red into the black, and then began trying to convince AMF to start producing a boat similar to the J/24. When AMF didn't jump, in February of 1977, at age 43, Bob did and threw in his lot with J/Boats.

With Rod contributing the design and his prototype 'Ragtime' and Bob investing $20,000 to cover start-up costs, office space, and advertising, their 50-50 partnership was launched. They sold 250+ (and delivered 136) J/24s that first year. Each successive year has marked unique achievements in the sport and industry. 

The next generation of Johnstones has been at the helm since 1988, while founders Rod and Bob continue to contribute their talents. Since 1992, Jeff (president) & Alan (vice president & designer) have managed company operations from J/Boats Headquarters in Newport, RI while a total of six of Bob & Rod's sons (Jeff, Alan, Stu, Drake, Phil and Peter) serve on the J/Boats Board of Directors.

  • J/Newsletter- May 15th, 2019 J/Sailing News

    The Sun Never Sets on J's Sailing Worldwide

    What a difference a week makes in late spring regards weather patterns.  While the USA and Canada are still stuck in a messy pattern over North America, Eurasia had what amounted to a “glam” week of weather last weekend.  Seemingly, most places had sun, lots of wind (some too much), and even “shorts & shades” temperatures!  The Italians for sure had fun sailing on the Adriatic Sea where the second event in their summer long Italian J/70 Cup series took place off Ancona, on the eastern shoreline, south of Venice. Forty-five boats reveled in the breezy conditions.  Then, off to their west, the famous PalmaVela Regatta took place off Palma, Mallorca, Spain, with a one-design fleet of J/80s and an ORC fleet that included a super-fast J/97E and well-sailed J/122. Literally sailing in the same waters was the first qualifying event for the SAILING Champions League raced in J/70s on the Bay of Palma, twenty-six teams from Russia to England, and Finland to Spain sailed in the four-day, sun-kissed, wind-blessed event. Then, further west, we find the RORC Vice Admirals Cup Regatta taking place off Cowes, England. Participating were one-design classes of J/70s, J/109s, J/111s and a Performance 40 IRC handicap fleet with a quite quick J/122E.

    Flying across the Atlantic to N.A., the first long offshore race of the season was sailed on Long Island Sound, a big fleet of boats from across the Northeast sailed in Larchmont Yacht Club’s Edlu Distance Race (a day race); sailing were sixteen J/models (J/44, J/30, J/111, J/109, J/121, J/120, J/92, J/42, J/105, J/124, J/100, J/88, J/112E, J/97E, & J/133)! Then, it was busy on the Pacific coast for two offshore races. In San Francisco, the Singlehanded Sailing Society hosted their annual Singlehanded Farallones Race; that mad dash out of San Francisco Bay, out into the big wide blue Pacific Ocean, around a harrowing clump of rocks known as the Farallones, then back inside the safety of the Bay. The J/105 and J/120 sailing the race did great- yet another sunny light to medium air race! Finally, one of the classic “feeder races” for the Swiftsure International Race and for a summer of great sailing on Seattle’s Puget Sound and further north was Corinthian YC of Portland’s Oregon Offshore Race. Starting off Astoria, Oregon, at opening of the Columbia River, the boats head north around Cape Flattery at the opening of the Juan de Fuca Strait, then head ESE to the finish at Victoria, British Columbia in Canada.  Sailing fast were a J/121, J/42, and a trio of J/105s.
     

    Thrills for Two, The Clever New J/99
    (Hamble, England)- According to Yachting World’s Pip Hare, “the J/99 is all thrills, no frills on board the versatile 32 foot offshore speedster.” She continued to explain her feelings and perspective in this in-depth test of the J/99 sailing in the Solent in southern England:

    “We ghosted down the Hamble River under mainsail alone, the water slipping silently past our red hull in the grainy half-light of a winter morning. We’d hoisted the mainsail in our marina berth, then sailed out into the river, the engine left in tick-over for less than two minutes almost as a token gesture. I felt like a naughty kid, slipping out, while the rest of the world was still waking up; going to make some trouble.

    I had come to test the new J/99, sailing double-handed with the British J/Boats importer J/U.K. on a chilly, blustery January morning. Within ten minutes our demure departure was all but forgotten as we came bursting out of Southampton Water, our senses assaulted from all angles by the bitter north wind and our 100m2 day-glo spinnaker. As the sun rose, everything about the day and this little powerhouse of a boat became bright, sharp and dynamic. I don’t know what the rest of the world was doing at 0800 on that January morning, but we were having a blast.

    The eagerly awaited J/99 directly targets a growing demographic of sailors who enjoy the fantastic short-handed racing scene available all across Europe. Of the 50+ orders already confirmed, over half of the new owners intend to race short-handed and it was with this type of sailing in mind I arrived to make the test.

    The new design incorporates some interesting changes for J/Boats, which bring the J/99 into line with its closest rivals in this area of the market. Gone is the retractable bowsprit and furling jib, which have been the stalwarts of J/Boat design for close to 20 years, making way for a beamier shape, a fixed bowsprit and a hank-on jib. It’s different, but despite the new features, this still remains resolutely ‘J’ in its appearance and feel.

    From the first moment I stepped into the cockpit, this boat struck me with its no-nonsense approach. Sail handling is simple, the cockpit clean and well laid-out, the helm dynamic and responsive. Just cruising down the river, the boat felt light and seemed to directly translate every puff of wind into increased speed. Compared to the Class 40s I have spent much of the last two years racing, the J/99 felt like a go-cart – a promising combination of agility and power.”   Read the rest of her in-depth review of the J/99 on Yachting World here.   For more J/99 Offshore Speedster sailboat information
     

    J/121 Spring Tune-Up
    (Newport, RI)- For the second year in a row, J/Boats is hosting the J/121 Spring Tune-up Regatta at Newport Shipyard on the famous Newport Harbor. The event is open to all J/121s and is free.  For any J/Sailors interested in checking out J/121s, please come on down to the docks and take a peek!

    The schedule starts Friday, May 17th at 1230 hrs for the Welcome and check-in.  Then, there will be on-the-water training on Narragansett Bay in the afternoon.  Afterwards, there is a debrief session with munchies and refreshments.

    On Saturday, there will be a skipper’s briefing at 0930 hrs and, thereafter, there is starting drills and short-course racing with on-the-water coaching until 1600 hrs. Again, a debrief with refreshments at Newport Shipyard will conclude the event.  To learn more about the J/121 offshore speedster
     

     
    Scottish Islands Peaks Race Preview
    (Oban, Scotland)- This adventure race is for teams of sailors and “fell” runners (both youth and adult) and is held annually around the most beautiful parts of the west coast of Scotland.

    The race starts in Oban (northwest of Glasgow) with a short hill run, and then the teams sail to Salen on the Isle of Mull, about 20.0nm south. After a run over Ben More on Mull, back to the boats and a sail to Craighouse on the Isle of Jura, about 45.0nm further south. After running the Paps, back aboard for the longest sail to the Isle of Arran, about 82.0nm to the south, then east. The last run is around the Goat Fell, then a short sail east over to Troon, about 17.0nm. The race takes 3 to 4 days in total. The sailing part is about 165.0nm, the running part covers about 60.0 miles and 11,500 feet of climbing.

    Each team consists of five (usually 2 runners and 3 sailors), and there is also an All-Rounders class for sailors that can run or runners that can sail, and a class for Youth (with the assistance of a few adults).

    Background
    The race has several objectives:
    • one is to encourage sailors to appreciate fell running, for runners to appreciate sailing, and for both to enjoy what must be some of the best sailing and hill running in the world.
    • another is to help to build the self-confidence of the youngsters sailing in the Youth Teams.
    • Yet another is to raise funds for various good causes; but
    • the main objective is to provide a challenging experience to sailors and runners who may be too busy to devote weeks to sailing the Atlantic or trekking in Tibet, but who still relish overcoming a challenge which is well beyond those normally encountered in our modern well-insulated lives.
    The race is intended to be challenging and competitors need to be well prepared, fit and experienced to complete this course successfully. Senior Runners must be experienced in the hills and all carry specified survival gear. Yachts must have comprehensive safety gear including flares, VHF radio and engines (for emergency use and when the runners are off the boat). Oars and other muscle-powered devices are permitted for use in calms (e.g. think of the American version called the “Race to Alaska”).

    Many teams return year after year for their annual battle against the elements over one of the most beautiful running and sailing courses in the world. Perhaps, part of its charm is that every year brings its own memorable scenes, whether it is getting ahead of your nearest rival by means of a ‘cunning plan’, racing neck and neck with another team under spinnaker, gliding quietly through the water as dawn breaks, or encountering numerous whales and dolphins. The mountains offer a wide variety of challenging terrain and the sailing is equally varied so that, coupled with un-rivaled views of mountains and sea, so that each year brings a totally unique team experience for everyone.

    Although the race can be extremely competitive, for most people, it is not the thought of winning that brings them, but simply the pleasure of sailing and running in the company of a great crowd of like-minded people. We all love the hills and seas of the Scottish West Coast and the race is just an excuse for the annual jamboree when we can celebrate our good fortune at being able to experience this great adventure in these wonderful surroundings and in such good company.

    The sole J/crew this year will be a Youth Team on the J/110 BLUE BIRD owned by Iain Loudon. The FETTES CHOCOLATES Company is their sponsor. The crew consists of Laurie Mill, Ben Rushton, Maggie Rait, Duncan Harrison, Ellie Marks, Fiona Rees, Louisa Letts, James Mackman, Hector Tomlyn, and Murray Wilson. They will collectively be taking on thirty-nine other teams in the event!  For more Scottish Islands Peaks Race sailing information
     

     
    Open House! See the NEW J/99 Offshore Speedster
    Newport - Houston - San Francisco!
    (Newport, RI)- Treat yourself to a visit to take a tour of the new boat that is taking over Europe by storm (50+ boats) and is turning heads everywhere it goes around the world! The new J/99 shorthanded offshore speedster will have an Open House on Saturday, June 1st at three different locations nationwide- Newport, RI / Houston (Seabrook), TX / San Francisco (Alameda), CA.

    If you wish to see the J/99 firsthand, please fill out the online webform here to get an invitation and more details.

    For more J/99 Shorthanded Offshore Speedster information
     

    Regatta & Show Schedules:

    May 17-18- J/121 Spring Tune-Up- Newport, RI
    May 25- Spinnaker Cup Race- San Francisco, CA
    May 27- Coastal Cup Race- Monterey, CA
    May 30- Jun 2- Gran Prix Ecole de Navale- Brest, France
    May 30- SoCal 300 Race- San Diego, CA
    May 31- RORC North Sea Race- Cowes, England
    May 31- Jun 2- Southern Bay Race Week- Hampton, VA
    Jun 1- Delta Ditch Run- Richmond, CA
    Jun 1-2- Cal Race Week- Marina del Rey, CA
    Jun 1-2- Cedar Point One-Design Regatta- Cedar Point, CT
    Jun 1-2- Skyway Colors Regatta- Chicago, IL
    Jun 7-9- Helly Hansen Chicago NOOD Regatta- Chicago, IL
    Jun 7-15- Rolex Giraglia Cup Regatta- St. Tropez, France
    Jun 8- Bermuda One-Two Race- Newport, RI
    Jun 8- Farallones Race- San Francisco, CA
    Jun 8-9- Lady Liberty Cup J/24 Regatta- New York Harbor, NY

    For additional J/Regatta and Event dates in your region, please refer to the on-line J/Sailing Calendar.

     
    Spectacular PalmaVela Regatta
    J/97E Dominates ORC Class, Big Battle in J/80s
    (Palma Mallorca, Spain)- The first major offshore sailing event on the Mediterranean calendar took place this past weekend- the 16th edition of Sail Racing PalmaVela.  Organized by the Real Club Náutico de Palma, the regatta for 124 teams from 23 countries was held from the 8th to 12th of May. The sailors were treated to four spectacular days of sailing on the beautiful Bay of Palma.

    In the ORC 2 Class, the Frenchman Olivier Parchet & Russian Andrey Kochnev’s joined forces on the J/122 NOISY OYSTER to take fifth place with a 4-3-5-5-4 record for 16 pts. Then, in the ORC 4 Class, Englishman Scott Beattie’s J/97E JUST THE JOB completely cleaned house, so to speak, sweeping the class with a record of all 1sts to count for 4 pts net!

    Sailing nearly as dominating in the J/80 one-design class was Miquel Pujadas & Helena Alegre’s ATILA, they won counting six 1sts and two 2nds for 10 pts net! However, the big battle took place just behind them for the balance of the top five.  In the end, it was Kristyn Gills’ COOPER RIGGING that placed second with 17.5 pts net, Jason Beaver’s NAUTIPAINTS was third with 24.5 pts net, 4th was Pablo Mellino’s Spanish crew on ALOJA with 27 pts net, and 5th was Andrew Cheetham’s British crew on CONFERMA with 34 pts net.

    What was fascinating to observe in the lead up to the TP52 Super Series was how many of the top teams were led by former (and current) J/Owners and J/Sailing alumni.  Here is the breakdown of top J/sailors dominating the TP52 class:

    1st- Ed Baird (J/24 World Champion) steering Doug Devos’ QUANTUM RACING (J/44 Great Lakes Champion/ Chicago-Mac Race winners). The same team has included Terry Hutchinson as skipper/ tactician (J/24 World Champion and now spearheading the New York YC America’s Cup campaign).
    2nd- Harm Muller Spreer’s PLATOON- from Germany- J/70s
    3rd- Alberto Roemmer’s AZZURA- from Italy- J/24s
    4th- Takashi Okura’s SLED- from Japan- J/24s in Japan and J/70s in the USA
    6th- Hasso Plattner & daughter Kristina Plattner’s PHOENIX- from Germany- J/24, J/105, J/125
    7th- Vladimir Liubomirov’s BRONENOSEC- from Russia with USA tactician Morgan Larson- J/24s
    9th- Tony Langley’s GLADIATOR- UK- J/24s in England

    Sailing photo credits- Nico Martinez.  For more PalmaVela Regatta sailing information
     

     
    NRV Tops SAILING Champions League- Qualifier I
    (Palma de Mallorca, Spain)- Norddeutscher Regatta Verein from Germany took advantage of sensational sailing conditions in Palma de Mallorca to win the first of three qualifiers in season six of the SAILING Champions League. The top eight finishing clubs from Germany, Denmark, Switzerland, the Netherlands and Finland secured a place at the Final in St Moritz, Switzerland later this summer.

    It was the first time the SAILING Champions League has visited the beautiful Mediterranean island of Mallorca, a mecca for grand prix sailing. Hosted by Club Nàutic S’Arenal, the sailors from 26 yacht clubs and 16 nations loved the stellar racing conditions along the waterfront.  Racing off the beach front resorts gave spectators front row seats on the incredibly fast and tight competition that took place over four days.

    Florian Haufe, who skippered Norddeutscher Regatta Verein to victory in the dreamy chamber of commerce sunny and breezy conditions, commented: “We just had four days with perfect sailing conditions, really close races and very tough competition. I have a great team to sail with. It was our goal to secure a place at the SAILNG Champions League Final in St Moritz this August and we made it!” Haufe’s NRV crew included David Heitzig, Miklas Meyer, and Dorian Heitzing.

    The top eight finishing teams in Palma secured a place at the Final in St Moritz, Switzerland from 15 to 18 August 2019. The eight qualified clubs are:
    1. Norddeutscher Regatta Verein- Germany
    2. Club Nautique de Versoix- Switzerland
    3. Kongelig Dansk Yachtklub- Denmark
    4. Société Nautique de Genève- Switzerland
    5. Kaløvig Bådelaug- Denmark
    6. WSV Almere Centraal- The Netherlands
    7. Frederikshavn Sejlklub- Denmark
    8. Brändö Seglare- Finland
    The racing was hard fought all the way to the finish, with the 9th place finisher, Württembergischer Yacht-Club from Germany just missing out on a qualifying place by 1.6 points.

    The Palma regatta was the first of three SAILING Champions League Qualifiers, with the second event due to be hosted by the Yacht Club Costa Smeralda in Porto Cervo, Sardinia, from 23 to 26 May. A few weeks later it’s on to St Petersburg, Russia, from 4 to 7 July for the third and concluding Qualifier before the grand final in August.

    SAP Sailing Analytics provided 24/7 statistics and data for sailors, fans, spectators and media like GPS tracking, real-time analysis, and a live leaderboard combined with 2D visualization. You can find all results here on the SAP Sailing Analytics site: http://scl2019-qualifier1.sapsailing.com!

    Watch this fun, entertaining 2019 SAILING Champions League highlights video here on YouTube:

    For more SAILING CHAMPIONS League sailing information
     

     
    Great Sailing @ RORC Vice Admirals Cup
    J/122E Wins, J/109s & J/111s Enjoy Tight Class Racing!
    (Cowes, England)- The Royal Ocean Racing Club’s annual Vice Admiral’s Cup Regatta was sailed this past weekend on the every capricious Solent.  The fleet was treated to a wide variety of weather conditions, cloudy to sunny, light to breezy, shifty to streaky, and, of course, lots and lots of current off Cowes!  Here is how it all went down over the three-day event for the one-design classes of J/70s, J/109s, and J/111s.

    Day One- Light Freaky Friday
    The opening day served up light airs, with big shifts and wind reversals that challenged competitors and race officials alike. A quiet morning quickly gave way to an afternoon that started with fast-paced action on both course areas.

    The first start was for the J/111 and J/109 classes in a very shifty southwesterly of 10-12 knots that created plenty of tactical challenges in a tight race with a short 0.8 mile windward leg. The fleet strongly favored the committee boat end of the line and the first start was abandoned with 40 seconds to go.

    In the restart, the fleet was more spaced out, with Cornel Riklin's J/111 JITTERBUG closest to the pin end of the line. Both Simon Bamford's KESTREL and Joerg Sigg's LALLEKONIG appeared well placed mid-line, but the former was OCS.

    It was an intense race for the J/111s, with two laps completed in only 35 minutes, and the first five boats finishing just 69 seconds apart. Joerg Sigg's Swiss LALLEKONIG took victory, 20 seconds ahead of Tony Mack's McFLY, with Cornel Riklin's JITTERBUG third.

    Day Two- Strong, Shifty Saturday
    The second day of racing delivered four short, sharp races that tested the 72 competing boats and hundreds of sailors over a wide range of conditions. It was day of intensely close racing in a very shifty north-northwesterly breeze of mostly 10-15 knots, but with a number of lighter spells and a brief squall that saw gusts above 20 knots.

    “Today was really enjoyable, with great racing and good courses set in tricky conditions,” said Christopher Daniel- his J/122e JUNO was leading the Performance 40 class. “It was a big challenge to make sure we stayed in phase with the 20-25 degree wind shifts, but it was champagne sailing. We came ashore with big smiles.”

    The J/70 class joined the action for the first time on Saturday, with the fleet enthusiastic to get away. Five boats – Andrew Barraclough’s JENGA 8, David Atkinson’s RASCAL RACING, Patrick Liardet’s COSMIC, Doug Streuth’s DSP and Adam Munday’s OCEAN ROPE – were all called over at the start of the first race.

    This left the way open for Paul Ward’s EAT SLEEP J REPEAT to pull out an impressive 10 length lead by the end of the first beat. He was followed by Charlie Thompson’s BRUTUS and “the comeback kids” on Liardet’s COSMIC, even though the latter also lost out through overstanding the first mark. In the end, Ward finished more than a minute ahead of Clive Bush’s DARCEY, while COSMIC took third just four seconds later.

    DSP won the second race, but slipped down to 11th in the third race. The fourth and final race of the day saw Darcey take a commanding win, ahead of BRUTUS. In the tightest of finishes, Philip Rees’ BRYN took third place just three seconds later, and DSP fourth, seven seconds later.

    The larger yachts sailed in a different course area, further east. The third race of the day saw fast-paced action in its closing stages as a shower swept across the race area. With the wind speed peaking beyond 20 knots the leaders powered to the finish in full planing mode.

    The Performance 40 class raced for the first time today. Christopher Daniel’s J/122e JUNO rose to an early overall lead with a second place followed by two wins over the fast King 40s.

    Tony Mack’s McFLY asserted near dominance in the J/111 fleet, taking two decisive wins and two second places. The winner of yesterday’s race, Joerg Sigg’s LALLEKONIG took a 30 percent points penalty for an infringement in race 3, and now lies one point behind McFLY in the overall standings.

    Competition further down the fleet is equally strong in this class, with Chris Jones’ JOURNEYMAKER II on 14 points, and both Jan Van Berne’s RED HERRING and Cornel Riklin’s JITTERBUG on 15 points going into the final day.

    Chris Preston’s J/109 JUBILEE started the day with back-to-back race wins, and took second in the next two.  However, with a discard applied, Simon Perry’s JIRAFFE retained a single point advantage in the overall rankings. Mike Yates’ JAGO also notched up three podium finishes today, but slipped to sixth in the penultimate race and is eight points adrift in third overall.

    Day 3- Simply Splendid Sunday
    Summer sun returned for Sunday’s racing, with bright sun and rising temperatures, but initially without any wind. The committee boats left the dock when the beginnings of a southerly of 2-3 knots sprang up in the central Solent at 1030 hrs. Half an hour later, it had swung into the southeast and increased to 8 knots and the AP flags signaling the postponement came down at 1100.

    The Performance 40 class went into the final day with a much tighter leaderboard- Chris Daniel's J/122E JUNO led the class, counting four points from three races, just one point ahead of a King 40.

    At the start of the opening race two boats headed off to the right hand side of the course and rounded 1-2, closely followed by Daniel’s J/122E JUNO. By the end of the race, the JUNO team sailed impeccably, crossing the line first and saving her time on the fleet. JUNO took another decisive victory in the final race to win overall 10 points ahead the next boat.

    At the start of the day, five boats were still in contention for a podium place in the J/111 fleet. A win in both of today's races sealed Tony Mack's class victory on McFLY, 6.5 points ahead of Sigg's LALLEKONIG. The three-way fight for third was resolved in favor of Chris Jones' JOURNEYMAKER II, thanks to his two second places.

    Last year's J/109 class winner, Simon Perry's JIRAFFE went into the final day one point ahead of Chris Preston's JUBILEE. Both were neck and neck at the end of the first run of today's first race, with JUBILEE rounding the mark inside JIRAFFE. Both had been late to drop their spinnakers, which were still hoisted to the lower spreaders, as they turned up to windward. JUBILEE was quick to complete the drop, however JIRAFFE had a snag and had slipped to leeward and astern by the time it was sorted.

    In a tight finish, that saw more than half the fleet cross the line in just 22 seconds, JIRAFFE recovered to lead by 12 seconds ahead of JUBILEE, with RNSA's JOLLY JACK TAR taking third place five seconds later and David Richard's JUMPING JELLYFISH fourth, just five seconds after that.

    JUBILEE won the final race, but JIRAFFE took second, just 19 seconds ahead of John Smart's JUKEBOX. It was enough to seal overall victory for JIRAFFE by one point. A very consistent performance by JUMPING JELLYFISH, with an almost straight run of 4ths, secured third overall, one point ahead of JOLLY JACK TAR.

    The J/70 class used the regatta as Round 3 of their 2019 UK J/70 Grand Slam Series. A win in both races today saw Paul Ward's EAT SLEEP J REPEAT cement overall victory ahead of Clive Bush's DARCEY, while reigning Grand Slam Champion, Doug Struth's DSP, was third. All races were decided by a minute or less, with race five going to Ward’s ESJR by just five seconds from DARCEY.

    "This was the first time for the J/70s at the Vice Admiral's Cup and the race team did a great job for us, with six exciting races over two days," says Ward. "Onshore at the RORC clubhouse, we enjoyed catching up with the other classes over a few beers and a curry. Thanks to all of the team at RORC for a great event!”  For more RORC Vice Admiral’s Cup sailing information
     

     
    J/121 Wins Oregon Offshore Race!
    J/105s Enjoy Bruising Class Battle to the Finish!
    (Astoria, OR)- The 43rd Annual Oregon Offshore International Yacht Race, sponsored by Schooner Creek Boatworks, started on Thursday, May 9th, 2019 after a postponement that was waiting for the 5.5 kts ebb tide and current to begin to flow out of the Columbia River and over the infamous Columbia River Bar just offshore- a place notorious for massive standing waves and flipping over even the hardiest US Coast Guard Patrol boats! The timing was smart, since the weather was somewhat benign and all boats made it across the bar without any issues, just some of the usual cascades of water over the deck!

    The 193-mile race started at 9:25am at Buoy 2 off the Columbia River entrance off Astoria, Oregon and finished at the entrance to Victoria, British Columbia harbor in Canada.  After the start, everyone took off on starboard, heading offshore, apparently following the information gained at the skippers meeting. Wind was a light northeaster, blowing offshore at the start. As the race progressed it appeared the predicted northwest shift would hit the fleet overnight, then the teams would have to contend with light winds in the Straits of Juan de Fuca and avoiding adverse currents; the big decision being when to go for one shore over the other- USA to the south or Canada to the north while heading for the Victoria, BC harbor finish line.

    As anticipated, leading the fleet out offshore the first night was David Raney’s RAGE; a huge, skinny like a rail, ULDB 70 footer.  However, the pleasant surprise was that second boat overall was Scott Campbell's beautiful new J/121 RIVA and his merry bandits from Portland, Oregon; chasing RAGE hard all night and all day long on Friday keeping them in sight most of the time (giving away 30+ feet of waterline, too)!

    The fleet enjoyed decent winds for most of the race and the hot angles were very much enjoyed by the J/121 RIVA. After rounding Cape Flattery at the northwestern tip of the Olympic Peninsula, RIVA and all other J/Teams sailed down to at least Clallam Bay on the USA side before making the “escape” across the Juan de Fuca Straits to the Canadian side to the north to play that shoreline into the finish at Victoria.

    After waiting a few hours for other boats to finish, Campbell’s J/121 RIVA crew were ecstatic to find out they had won the Oregon Offshore, both PHRF A1 Class and PHRF Overall! Their corrected time for the race was 40 hrs 9 min 31 secs, enough to win by over an hour on the second place team (a 4.825 kts average). Third in PHRF A1 Class was the J/42 VELOCITY skippered by Thomas Keffer.

    The Portland J/105 Fleet had a one-design start, producing a three-way battle between Dough Pihlaja’s ABSTRACT, Dennis Sibilla’s ESCAPE ARTIST, and of course, the trio on FREE BOWL OF SOUP (Doug Schenk, Eric Hopper, Matt Davis- their 6th time)! After the smoke and fog cleared on the race track, it was Pihlaja’s ABSTRACT that snagged PHRF A2/ J/105 Class honors, knocking off a three-time winner of the race- the “Soupers”- by over 2 hours. As a result, third was Sibilla’s ESCAPE ARTIST, just eight minutes behind the Soupers; indeed, it was a battle for the silver between those two boats to the very end.  ABSTRACT’s “big move” was to continue way offshore on starboard tack until late midday on Friday over 20 hours after the start. The initial leaders- the Souper’s and Escaper’s- both tacked away at 6pm on Thursday and both dueled going up the shore, tacking on shifts headed to Cape Flattery, the first major turning point. 33 hours into the race, ABSTRACT rounded Cape Flattery at 7pm, just before sunset, with neither of their competitors in sight, and they continued on their merry way to the class win.  Meanwhile, it was a complete “dust-up” behind them.  It was not until 10pm did the Escaper’s lead the Souper’s around Cape Flattery. In the ensuing gybing duel to the finish with their A2 spinnakers flying all night, it took the Souper’s until 7:30am on Saturday morning to pass the Escaper’s, leading their exhausted friends into the finish line.  Replay the entire race here to see how all the boats got around the race track.
    For more Oregon Offshore Race sailing information
     

     
    ENJOY 1.0 Wins Italy J/70 Cup Ancona
    (Ancona, Italy)- The second leg of the Italian J/70 Cup Series was hosted by Marina Dorica on the Adriatic Sea on Italy’s eastern shore, a third down the coastline from Venice (east of Florence, NNE of Rome and west of Split, Croatia). Forty-five boats from eleven nations (Cyprus, Finland, Great Britain, Germany, Italy, Malta, Monaco, Poland, Russia, Slovenia, Switzerland) enjoyed great sailing for the first two days of the regatta, with the last day getting blown out by 30+ knot winds.  Winning his first major regatta in the Italian J/70 Class was Carlo Tomelleri’s ENJOY 1.0 with crew of Alberto Taddei, Daniele De Luca and Umberto De Luca.

    Saturday’s most amazing comeback, with a mind-blowing 3-2-1 tally, was one of Italy’s most famous sailors- Alberto Rossi's ENFANT TERRIBLE- ADRIA FERRIES. They jumped eleven spots on the leaderboard in one day into the silver medal position!

    Needless to say, Alberto could not have been more pleased after starting off so slowly on the first day with a 21-13-11.  In short, his team of Alberto Bolzan, Bianca Crugnola, Branko Brcin, and Stefano Rizzi sailed better, faster, smarter every race!  Not a bad recipe for success!  Olympic Silver Medallist- the Slovenian Branko Brcin- was calling tactics for Alberto.

    Rossi commented, “It would have been nice to be able to compete in the last two races to arrive at a complete series of eight races and compete to the end.  We love to sail in strong winds like we saw today. But, the Committee's choice to cancel was the best choice. In any case, Ancona proved to be an excellent regatta field, and the organization of the event by Marina Dorica was once again excellent. As a participant, I congratulate all organizers both at sea and on land.  We have dispelled the myth that in the Adriatic there are not the right conditions to race!"

    Completing the podium was J-CURVE, sailed by Mauro Roversi, with Manuel Weiller on tactics, and crew of Carlo Fracassoli, Federica Salva and Manuel Modena. The balance of the top five included two more top Italian crews. Fourth was MAGIC DAS skippered by Alessandro Zampori and fifth place went to Francesco Farneti, with the Olympian from Marche Filippo Maria Baldassari on board.

    In the Corinthian rankings, it was Gianfranco Noè’s WHITEHAWK team (Emanuele Noe, Giuliano Chiandussi, Irene Giorgini, & Maurizio Planine) that took the crown.  They were followed by WHY NOT #SLAM sailed by Alessio Zucchi and the Russian team on M-SAILING- Andrey Malygin.  Italian J/70 Cup entry list  Italian J/70 Cup results   For more Italian J/70 Cup Ancona sailing information
     

     
    Fast & Furious Edlu Distance Race
    (Larchmont, NY)- Larchmont Yacht Club kicked off it summer offshore sailing season this past weekend with their famous “sprint”- the Edlu Race. First sailed in 1956, it has long been a classic tune-up race for the Block Island Race and Block Island Race Week. Following the race is their classic party, it is one of the “must-do” events on western Long Island Sound. In some respects, one could say it is the “race to the party” for most teams!

    The event has two courses for different types of sailors.  The Spinnaker course is 32.0nm from the Larchmont Breakwater to Gong 11B off Eaton's Neck and back. The Non-Spinnaker course is approximately 20.0nm.

    In the nine-boat IRC Class Len Sitar’s J/44 VAMP from Storm Trysail Club took fourth place.

    The top six of the PHRF Spinnaker 1 division was packed with J/teams.  Second was Bill & Jackie Baxter’s J/111 FIREBALL, fourth was John Greifzu’s J/109 GROWTH SPURT, fifth was Cory Eaves’ J/109 FREEDOM, and sixth was William Ingraham’s J/124 TENEBRAE.

    Winning the PHRF Spinnaker II division was “the kids” racing the J/105 YOUNG AMERICAN 324.  Third was the J/100 TEXAS ROSE sailed by William Komaroff.  Fifth and sixth were two J/88s; Paul Strauch’s ANDIAMO and Iris Vogel’s DEVIATION YCC.

    In the PHRF Spinnaker III 3 Division, Paul Zinger’s J/30 ZINGER snagged the bronze medal.

    The eight-boat PHRF Doublehanded Division was a J/Tour’de’force’ on the podium.  Winning was Abhijeet Lee’s J/111 VARUNA, followed in third place by Jon Yoder & Bill Gassman’s J/100 BLACKCOMB.

    The six-boat PHRF Plus-One Spinnaker I Division was won by Ron Richman’s J/133 ANTIDOTE, followed by Sarah & Josh Reisberg’s J/120 ABILYN in second.  Rounding out the top five were Arthur Hanlon’s J/112E DAUNTLESS in fourth and Steven Levy’s J/121 EAGLE in fifth position.

    The half-dozen boats sailing in PHRF Plus-One Spinnaker II Division saw Todd Aven’s famous J/92 THIN MAN take the silver, followed by Tim Mount’s J/97E VESPER elevating the bronze medal around their necks.

    The Edlu Short Course Racing Non-spinnaker division was the short, fast race.  In that sprint, Charles A. Taus’ J/33 SIRIUS took the bronze, followed Kurt Locher’s J/42 ATALANTA in fourth place.  Sailing photo credits- Howie McMichael  For more Larchmont YC Edlu Distance Race sailing information
     

     
    Lovely Singlehanded Farallones Race
    (San Francisco, CA)- It is not often that one can use the term “benign” or “lovely” when one thinks of sailing out past the Golden Gate Bridge, into the teeth of big Pacific storm swells that often break massively on the notorious “Potato Patch”, a giant shoal offshore or the Farallones “rocks”. However, the 2019 edition of the Singlehanded Sailing Society’s Singlehanded Farallones Race was in fact “lovely” and, as one sailor described it, “easily one of the most pleasant sails out and back that I can remember; even southeast Farallones Rock was looking benign!”

    Ex-J/92 racer Robert Johnston went on to say, “on the return inbound to San Francisco Bay, it was all about keeping the apparent wind on the beam. I wasn't sure I could do it in the 7-10 kts TWS we had coming back - sailing the rhumbline put TWA at least 150. I flew an old J/105 kite and was able to keep AWA at 100-120 and sail straight from the island back to the Gate. Of course, the lighter ULDBs cleaned up in that stuff.”

    In the PHRF Spin 5 Class, skipper of the J/105 VUJA STAR- Chris Kim- excitedly hopped onto the podium for the bronze, just 2 minutes shy on corrected time from taking the silver. Meanwhile, while Tracy Rogers’ J/120 HOKULANI took 4th and fellow 120 owner- Sean Mulvihill- placed 5th, just over 6 minutes back on corrected handicap time.  For more Singlehanded Farallones Race sailing information
     

    J/Community
    What friends, alumni, and crew of J/Boats are doing worldwide
    -----------
     
    The J/70 JEDI was doing its thing racing at The Royal Prince Alfred Yacht Club’s weekend series on Pittwater Bay, Sydney, Australia. Top speed 19.2 knots! Loving it!
    https://www.facebook.com/jboatsaustralia/videos/2050658271670496/

     
    * The J/125 HAMACHI and her delivery crew had some fun taking their recent trip down the California coastline- lots of sun, wind, and big Pacific swell to surf along on.  Here is their drone video- check it out!

    They commented, “here is some Mavic Air drone video of our awesome 360 nm delivery down the California coast from Richmond YC to the California YC in Marina Del Rey. The video taken about 25 miles off of Morrow Bay in 18-20 kts of wind with Hamachi doing 14-16 kts of boat speed. Hamachi covered 240 nm in a 24 hour period between Point Sur and the Channel Islands. Make sure to watch this 4K video on a large screen!

    This was only the second time we've attempted to fly the drone from Hamachi. We were pretty excited to get it back on board, as you will see here, because we had no idea if we could in these conditions... Enjoy!”  https://youtu.be/shx0tMgh8IAAdd to Flipboard Magazine.

    Read more...
  • J/Newsletter- May 8th, 2019 J/Sailing News

    The Sun Never Sets on J's Sailing Worldwide

    Starting off in New Zealand, we heard from our friends from way, way Down Under regards how their new J/88 was doing in the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron’s Club Marine Wednesday Night summer series. Racing takes place off the picturesque city of Auckland (current home of the America’s Cup) and sailing is held on the capricious Waitemata Harbour. Apparently, the J/88 took it to the locals and had a successful season!

    Heading east across the Pacific, we find the San Diego YC in San Diego, CA held their annual Yachting Cup for one-design fleets of J/70s, J/105s, and J/120s, as well as hosted PHRF handicap racing. Straight north in the northwest corner of America, the infamous Sloop Tavern YC of Seattle, WA held their wildly popular single/ doublehanded Race to the Straits event.  There were one-design classes for J/80s and J/105s, with a range of other J’s participating in about a dozen other PHRF handicap classes. Zipping across the continent to the east, the Annapolis YC held their annual Helly Hansen Annapolis NOOD Regatta for one-design classes of J/22s, J/24s, J/70s, J/80s, J/105s, and J/111s- nearly 75% of the whole fleet!  Moving on up to the northeast, American YC held their second and final weekend of their annual AYC Spring Series for over 70 boats in nine separate classes– IRC/ PHRF handicap and one-design classes for J/44s, J/109s, J/88s, J/105s, J/70s, and J/80s- over 60% of the fleet on western Long Island Sound.

    As we do a fly-by of the Caribbean, we find the Caribbean Winter Circuit of insanely beautiful and wonderful sailing regattas has now come to a close with the completion of Antigua Sailing Week (yes, tears are welling up in everyone’s eyes for sure!) . Several J/teams participated and earned more silverware- two J/122s, a J/120, a J/11S, and J/30.

    Hopping across the Atlantic, we would have seen an RORC Cervantes Race fleet starting off Cowes, England and then criss-crossing the English Channel (La Manche) in ferocious weather conditions; a number of J/crews took a beating but savored their medals in the end- sailing were J/105s, J/109s, J/111s, and a J/133. Across the northern part of the English Channel and into the Baltic, the Kiel Sailing Club was hosting their first major offshore sailing event of the 2019 season- the MAIOR CUP Regatta sailed off Kiel, Germany for J/70s and J/80s and other handicap boats.  While still in Germany, but at the southern border in Starnberg, the Deutsche Segel-Bundesliga (the German J/70 Sailing League) held their first event of the season for THIRTY-SIX teams sailing in the 1st and 2nd Leagues. To say sailing conditions were a bit fraught, ferocious, and fresh to frightening would be an understatement; try sailing in 36 deg F, blowing 20-30 kts, with extreme amounts of hail. Not!! But, they did! What were they thinking, one might ask? Down south in Spain, the Spanish J/80 fleet in Santander held their Cantabrian Championship, hosted by the Real Club Nautico Santander.

    Finally, in a much more sybaritic atmosphere, like Greece, in the Mediterranean, sunny, warm waters, warm winds, the J/24 class was hosting their 2019 European Championship in Patras, Greece on their southwestern shore— pretty place! Thirty-one J/24s enjoyed what was, essentially, a nice one-week vacation in paradise.
     

     
    Open House! See the NEW J/99 Offshore Speedster
    Newport - Houston - San Francisco!
    (Newport, RI)- Treat yourself to a visit to take a tour of the new boat that is taking over Europe by storm (50+ boats) and is turning heads everywhere it goes around the world! The new J/99 shorthanded offshore speedster will have an Open House on Saturday, June 1st at three different locations nationwide- Newport, RI / Houston (Seabrook), TX / San Francisco (Alameda), CA.

    If you wish to see the J/99 firsthand, please fill out the online webform here to get an invitation and more details.

    For more J/99 Shorthanded Offshore Speedster information
     

     
    PalmaVela Regatta Preview
    (Palma Mallorca, Spain)- The countdown begins for the first major offshore sailing event on the Mediterranean calendar. The 16th edition of Sail Racing PalmaVela begins on Thursday, with 124 teams from 23 countries. Organized by the Real Club Náutico de Palma, the regatta will be held from the 8th to 12th of May. Four days of pure racing action on the simply spectacular Bay of Palma will decide the winners; the forecast for sun, wind, clear skies looks no less amazing.

    A number of enthusiastic J/sailors will be participating from across Europe and the Mediterranean.  Perhaps, the most competitive class in the event will be the J/80s and it looks to be a latter day remake of the Spanish armada against the British main.  The Spanish teams include Dmitry Bishayev’s ROSHAMBO, Csaba Szentpetery’s ALOJA, Kristyn Gills’ NAUTIPAINTS, and Miquel Pujadas-Corro’s ATILA.  Showing up to this battle from Great Britain are COOPER RIGGING/ JOTAJUERGA and Andrew Cheetham’s CONFERMA/ NOW4.

    In the world of ORC handicap racing are at least four fleets. In ORC 2 Class will be Olivier Parchet & Andrey Kochnev’s French team on the J/122 NOISY OYSTER. In ORC 4 Class will be Scott Beattie’s British crew on the J/97E JUST THE JOB.  For more PalmaVela Regatta sailing information
     

     
    Palma SAILING Champions League- Qualifier I
    (Palma de Mallorca, Spain)- This weekend, the SAILING Champions League will kick off in Palma de Mallorca. It's the premiere for Club Nautic Arenal Mallorca as the host club with a fleet of a dozen J/70 one-design sailboats.  The racing promises to be simply spectacular, as they will be racing on the same Bay of Palma as the “big boat” PalmaVela Regatta.

    There will be twenty-seven teams from across Europe that will be racing in the unique “sailing league” format that was pioneered by the Deutsche Segel-Bundesliga five years ago.  Teams that are sailing in the event include Austria (YC Hard), Denmark (Kongelig Dansk YC, Kalovig Badelaug, Frederikshavn Sejlklub), Finland (Nylandska Jaktklubben, Brando Seglare), France (Club de Voile Saint-Aubin Elbeuf, Club de Voile de Saint Quentin), Germany (Norddeutscher Regatta Verein, Wurttembergischer YC), Italy (Aeronautica Militare, Societa Canottieri Garda Salo), Lithuania (RS280 Club, Gergo Vejo Klubas, Sailing Club Greitis), Netherlands (WV Almere Centraal, Jachtclub Scheveningen), Norway (Moss Seilforening), Portugal (Clube de Vela de Lagos), Russia (Leviathan Sailing Team), Slovenia (JK MIPC, PD Morska Vidra), Spain (Club Nautic de Arenal), Sweden (Goteborg Kungliga Segelsallskap), Switzerland (Societe Nautique Geneve, Club Nautique de Versoix), and the United Kingdom (Royal Thames YC).

    Like America’s recent very famous horse race, the Kentucky Derby with a $3.0 million dollar purse for the winner, “room at the mark" (or, fence) will be critical in such tight, hot racing action on 15-20 minutes double windward-leeward racing!  The handicappers at Ladbrokes UK will likely be trying to figure out which “horses” in this battle are going to qualify for the finale in September.  Based on past performance, there is no question these teams should be a factor at the top of the leaderboard:
    • Societe Nautique Geneve- Guillaume Girod, Nicolas Anklin, Benoit Lagneux
    • Moss Seilforening- Karl-Einar Jensen, Joern Erik Rudd, Paal Einar Berntsen, Roger Larsen
    • WV Almere Centraal- John den Engelsman, Rob van Burik, Rinse Ubbink, Willem Jan van Dort
    • Norddeutscher Regatta Verein- Florian Haufe, David Heitzig, Miklas Meyer, Dorian Heitzing
    • Club de Voile Saint-Aubin Elbeuf- Sylvian Escurat, Juliete Dubreuil, Clement Margueray, Emilien Polaert
    • KDY Royal Danish YC- Henrik Jensen, Henning Lambertsen, Niels Gramkow, Thomas Hartrig
    Watch this fun, entertaining 2019 SAILING Champions League promotional video here on YouTube.
    For more SAILING CHAMPIONS League sailing information
     

    RORC Vice Admirals Cup Preview
    (Cowes, England)- The Royal Ocean Racing Club’s annual Vice Admiral’s Cup Regatta is an event held in the Solent and is designed for class racing and closely-banded IRC Rating classes with a mixture of windward/leeward and random-leg round-the-cans races. The format is quite popular with J/sailors since there is a mix of different kinds of racing, enabling teams to test themselves in the different formats.

    In the Performance 40 Class of ten boats will be Chris Daniel’s J/122E JUNO, up against a cast of First 40s and King 40s.

    The six-boat J/111 Class has teams from Great Britain, Netherlands, and Switzerland.  Notable teams include Louise Makin & Chris Jones JOURNEYMAKER II, Simon Bamford’s KESTREL, Paul Griffiths’ JAGERBOMB, Tony Mack’s McFLY, Jan Van Berne’s RED HERRING and Joerg Sigg’s LALLEKONIG.

    The half-dozen J/109s include most of the top dogs in the U.K. class.  Those teams include Chris Preston’s JUBILEE, Simon Perry’s JIRAFFE, Phil Warwick’s JOLLY JACK TAR, David Richards’ JUMPING JELLYFISH, Rob Cotterill’s MOJO RISIN, and Mike Yates’ JAGO.

    The nine-boat J/70 class promises tight, close racing as the teams prepare for the J/70 World Championship that will be sailed in U.K. home waters off Torquay in the southwest country.  Some of those leading crews include Andrew Barraclough’s JENGA 8, Patrick Liardet’s COSMIC, Doug Struth’s DSP, and Paul Ward’s EAT SLEEP J REPEAT. For more RORC Vice Admiral’s Cup sailing information
     

     
    Oregon Offshore Race Preview
    (Astoria, OR)- The 43rd Annual Oregon Offshore International Yacht Race, sponsored by Schooner Creek Boatworks, is scheduled to start on Thursday, May 9th, 2019.  This 193-mile race starts at Buoy 2 off the Columbia River entrance off Astoria, Oregon and finishes at the entrance to Victoria, British Columbia harbor in Canada.

    There are twenty participants participating in the event hosted by Corinthian YC Portland.  The entrants so far are the usual who’s who of the Portland sailing community, with some very welcome participants coming from out of the area.

    A top local boat includes Scott Campbell’s beautiful new RIVA, a state of the art J/121, crewed by the usual group of local rock stars.

    In addition to other local regulars, there is Phillip Wampold’s J/92 ZAFF RACING, the J/40 VELOCITY skippered by Thomas Keffer, and the Portland J/105 Fleet has a one-design start with three entrants (ABSTRACT, Dennis Sibilla’s ESCAPE ARTIST, and of course FREE BOWL OF SOUP (their 6th time!)!

    This year, in conjunction with the Royal Victoria Yacht Club, the event is featuring the First Annual Cascadia Cup, which will award a trophy to the competitor with the lowest combined time in the Oregon Offshore and qualifying races of the Swiftsure event.  For more Oregon Offshore Race sailing information
     

    Edlu Distance Race Preview
    (Larchmont, NY)- This coming weekend marks the start of the summer offshore racing program for Larchmont Yacht Club.  The Edlu Race, first sailed in 1956, has long been a classic tune-up race for the around Block Island Race and Block Island Race Week. Followed by a classic party, it is one the “must-do” events on western Long Island Sound.

    The Spinnaker course is 32.0nm from the Larchmont Breakwater to Gong 11B off Eaton's Neck and back. The Non-Spinnaker course is approximately 20.0nm.

    The start times are set for slower boats to start first and enable everyone to get back to Larchmont YC in time for the “Sailors Welcome” with lots of camaraderie, hot dogs, chili, beer, dark‘n’stormies and live music!

    In the nine-boat IRC Class is Steven Levy’s J/121 EAGLE from Indian Harbor YC and Len Sitar’s J/44 VAMP from Storm Trysail Club.

    The eight-boat PHRF Doublehanded Division includes Jon Yoder & Bill Gassman’s J/100 BLACKCOMB from Larchmont YC, Josh Burack’s J/105 PEREGRINA from Huguenot YC, Abhijeet Lee’s J/111 VARUNA from New York YC, and Mike Greene’s J/35 LOBLOLLY from Cedar Point YC.

    At thirty-two boats, the PHRF Spinnaker Division is shaping up to be a battle by fourteen J/crews!  Participants include William Komaroff’s J/100 TEXAS ROSE, two J/105 YOUNG AMERICAN teams, Carl Olsson’s J/109 MORNING GLORY, Bill & Julie Baxter’s J/111 FIREBALL, Bill Ingraham’s J/124 TENEBRAE, Paul Zinger’s J/30 ZINGER, and Iris Vogel’s J/88 DEVIATION.

    The eleven-boat PHRF Plus-One Spinnaker Division includes Eric Bicknese’s J/105 BIG EZ, Arthur Hanlon’s J/112E DAUNTLESS, Sara & Josh Reisberg’s J/120 ABILYN, Todd Aven’s J/92 THIN MAN, and Tim Mount’s J/97E VESPER.

    Finally, in the Edlu Short Course PHRF Non-Spinnaker Class will be Kurt Locher’s J/42 ATALANTA from host Larchmont YC.  For more Larchmont YC Edlu Distance Race sailing information
     

    Regatta & Show Schedules:

    May 9-12- SAILING Champions League- Palma Mallorca, Spain
    May 10-12- Grand Prix de St Cast- St Cast, France
    May 10-12- RORC Vice Admiral’s Cup- Cowes, England
    May 17-18- J/121 Spring Tune-Up- Newport, RI
    May 25- Spinnaker Cup Race- San Francisco, CA
    May 27- Coastal Cup Race- Monterey, CA
    May 30- Jun 2- Gran Prix Ecole de Navale- Brest, France
    May 30- SoCal 300 Race- San Diego, CA
    May 31- RORC North Sea Race- Cowes, England
    May 31- Jun 2- Southern Bay Race Week- Hampton, VA
    Jun 1- Delta Ditch Run- Richmond, CA
    Jun 1-2- Cal Race Week- Marina del Rey, CA
    Jun 1-2- Cedar Point One-Design Regatta- Cedar Point, CT
    Jun 1-2- Skyway Colors Regatta- Chicago, IL
    Jun 7-9- Helly Hansen Chicago NOOD Regatta- Chicago, IL
    Jun 7-15- Rolex Giraglia Cup Regatta- St. Tropez, France
    Jun 8- Bermuda One-Two Race- Newport, RI
    Jun 8- Farallones Race- San Francisco, CA
    Jun 8-9- Lady Liberty Cup J/24 Regatta- New York Harbor, NY

    For additional J/Regatta and Event dates in your region, please refer to the on-line J/Sailing Calendar.

     
    Shifty, Very Grey Annapolis NOOD Regatta
    (Annapolis, MD)- After three days of racing at the Helly Hansen NOOD Regatta Annapolis, 190 teams endured light to moderate and shifty cool winds on the Chesapeake Bay and some grey skies and even drizzle for most of the regatta. It was not exactly what the recipe called for in this generally warm weather, sunny most times, regatta on the pretty Chesapeake Bay. J/Crews were out in abundance for this popular springtime event with one-design classes of J/22s, J/24s, J/70s, J/80s, J/105s, and J/111s enjoying well-run races on the Bay. Here is how it all went down off Naptown.

    Day One
    In the 18-boat J/105 fleet, one-design veteran Peter McChesney (Annapolis, MD) was leading the regatta before the fourth and final race of the day, but a sixth-place finish pushed him into second overall, 2 points behind Cedric Lewis and Fredrik Salvesen (Annapolis, MD). “I’ve sailed with most of my crew for 30 years,” said McChesney. “Some of us know each other from our time at St. Mary’s College of Maryland.”

    A professional sailmaker and longtime one-design sailor, McChesney has won J/105 titles at past Annapolis NOOD regattas, as well as a J/105 Chesapeake Bay Championship, J/22 North American Championship and J/70 Corinthian National Championship. McChesney looks to draw on his vast racing experience to get him to the top of the leaderboard.

    “We definitely left some points out there,” said McChesney. “But tomorrow, our goal will be to stay in the hunt, and if it’s close going into the last day, we’ll think about getting a little more aggressive with the boats close to us to make sure we come out on top.”

    In keeping with NOOD tradition, title sponsor Helly Hansen was sponsoring two youth teams for the event. One team was comprised of local high school sailors racing in the J/80 fleet and the other is in the 30-boat J/70 fleet. Emma Snead (Annapolis, MD) skippered her team to a solid 12th-place standing after four races in the J/70s.

    Doug and Amy Stryker’s J/30 TOTALED MAYHEM, of Annapolis, led their fleet after the first day of racing. “We were really happy with our first race,” said Snead. “We hadn’t practiced in the boat much because the conditions were either too light or too heavy when we tried. But I got a lot better at steering throughout the day, especially on the upwinds, which was a great feeling.”

    The team’s coach, Geoff Becker, was onboard to offer advice when needed. “It was great having him out there,” said Snead. “He’s a really good coach and knows a lot about the boats, so having him was really helpful.”

    Snead normally sails dinghy classes like the Club 420 and FJ for high school sailing and the larger national youth dinghy circuits. “I love one-design racing, no matter what class I’m sailing. If it wasn’t one-design, it would be a lot harder to get into sailing. Because the NOOD comes to Annapolis each year, I had the opportunity to hop on a new kind of boat with my friends and go do this amazing regatta right here in our home waters.”

    Peter Wagner, owner and helmsman of the J/111 SKELETON KEY, trailered his boat from San Francisco for his third Annapolis NOOD. “We’re starting to become regulars,” said Wagner, “but we love racing in Annapolis. It’s a lot different than the conditions we get back home on San Francisco Bay, so it keeps us sharp.”

    Like many of the J/111’s at the Annapolis NOOD, Wagner is using the regatta to prepare for the J/111 World Championship in Chicago in August (a light to medium air venue in the summer). “Our crew has been sailing together for a while, so everyone knows each other really well. It’s good to get the boat to different venues, especially because San Francisco is so windy.”

    Wagner used a conservative race strategy to accumulate a solid first day of results. “The key was getting off the starting line clean. We were able to get out to the left side of the course, which was the place to be most of the day, except that last race, when we managed to go from first to fifth on one windshift!”

    Day Two
    The competition was especially tight in the 23-boat J/22 fleet. After six races, J.R. Maxwell (Annapolis, MD) and Matt and Laurie Schubert (Annapolis, MD) were tied for first with 23 points apiece.

    “I’ve known Matt since our college sailing days,” said Maxwell. “He went to the Merchant Marine Academy and I went to Tufts, so it’s great mixing it up with him years later at the NOOD. Most of our college sailing buddies have kids now, so it's a little different than the old days, but the competition is just as fierce.”

    “J.R. is a phenomenal sailor,” said Schubert. “It’s really fun to be tied with him heading into the last day. There’s nine or ten boats that could win most races, so we’re really happy to be where we’re at.”

    With Sunday’s forecast calling for stronger winds, there’s still plenty of racing left and Todd Hiller (Youngstown, NY) currently lurking in third place, 2 points from the top spot. “It could get sporty tomorrow,” said Schubert. “I think most of the competitors will sail their own race, but if J.R. decides to come after me, I’ll be ready for the challenge.”

    On the J/80 course, tactician John Bartlett (Annapolis, MD) was racing with longtime friend, John White, who led the 23-boat fleet after six races. “The Chesapeake Bay is really localized with breeze like this,” Bartlett said. “Sometimes you’re lucky when you’re in the right spot, and sometimes things get really tough.”

    Bartlett has been calling tactics for White since the 1980s, and their friendship reaches far beyond the race course. “John is a great sailor,” Bartlett said. “His preparation is top-shelf, and he’s really good at making the boat go fast, so we always have a chance.”

    Though White led his class heading into the final day, he’ll have to keep tabs on Trudy Murphy (Toronto, Ont) who catapulted herself into second place with three race wins today. “They’ve been sailing really well,” said Bartlett. “Trudy is getting off the starting line and staying clean up the course. They’ve beaten us in four out of six races, so we’ll have our hands full with them tomorrow.”

    The Helly Hansen NOOD Regatta’s North Sails Rally, a one-day, one-race affair for the area’s cruiser/racers, started near the entrance of Annapolis Harbor. Sailors enjoyed a multi-leg course out to the middle of the bay and back. With light winds and strong currents, the race course, although short, required acute attention to the bay’s subtle and changeable conditions.

    Dan Leonard’s J/100 FLASHPOINT won the spinnaker division easily, and in the non-spinnaker fleet, Nicholas Iliff’s J/105 MUSKRAT made quick work of the race course. Iliff’s J/105, which he’s owned since 1994, is a modified version of the popular 34-foot one-design. MUSKRAT has a deeper keel and a carbon-fiber mast than the standard J/105, and the crew prefers lighter winds.

    “If it’s not too breezy, we are good,” says Iliff, who credits his crew with turning in a perfect performance, particularly his brother Tony, who trims the mainsail. “Today, we saw 10 knots, which is about the maximum breeze we like before the boat gets tender. It was a perfect day for us.”

    MUSKRAT had a clean start and maintained a comfortable lead for most of the race, but when the wind went light near the finish, Iliff says there was a touch of concern onboard as trailing boats closed distance.

    “It was a straight-forward race, with a close reach each way, but today, we had a bit more current than we normally do. On the way back, we had to take a tack downwind, which forced us into a bit of a hole.”

    With patience, Iliff and his teammates persevered for the win in what he says is a casual start to their racing season, “It was nice, easy and straightforward, so it was just a matter of good sail trim and going fast.”
     
    Day Three
    Top J/80 class skipper John White (Annapolis, MD) won three of eight races over three days, finishing the Helly Hansen NOOD Regatta weekend series 21-points ahead of runner-up Daniel Wittig’s TURBO SLOTH.

    It was in impressive performance given the team hadn’t sailed together since October 2018 and White’s USA 1162 never finished worse than fourth place in the 23-boat fleet. White attributed his win to the collective skill of his crew, which included his son Kevin on the bow, trimmer and team boss Debbie Gosselin in the middle, and Jonathan Bartlett as tactician.

    “Jonathan was on fire this weekend and had us going the right way all the time,” White said. “We had the best boathandling of any boat out there. I would get us in trouble early on and they’d get me out of trouble. The boats are shockingly close in speed, and this weekend it was current and windshifts that made a difference, as well as going fast in a straight line.”

    As winner of his class, White was chosen as the Annapolis Helly Hansen NOOD Regatta’s Caribbean Challenger. He sailed in the British Virgin Islands 10 years ago, and says he won’t need much convincing to go and represent the Annapolis Yacht Club in October. Rounding out the podium in third place was the Canadians, Trudy Murphy on her aptly named FEISTY; she was tough and, unfortunately, did not have her “mojo” going on the last day, dropping down a spot after a 4-8 tally.

    For Bruce Golison (Long Beach, CA), winning the J/70 fleet was a small step on the road to a larger goal. “I’m 62-years-old and still looking to win my first world championship,” said Golison. In a class defined by boatspeed, Golison and crew have spent the past three years honing their skills in the hottest one-design fleet in the country.

    “We really had to keep our heads out of the boat this weekend,” said Golison. “It was shifty out there, and on our course, we couldn’t get much current relief by going to a side. We stuck to the middle most of the time and used our speed to get us out of tough situations.”

    As an experienced sailor from Southern California, Golison keeps his J/70 on the East Coast to take advantage of larger fleet sizes, but he plans to take it back to California for the summer to prepare for the world championships in Los Angeles next year. “I hope I have it in me,” said Golison. “There’s not many sports that you can still be competitive at 62, but we have great focus on our team and we’re all putting in the work. We really want this.”

    Behind Golison’s MIDLIFE CRISIS on the podium, it was Travis Odenbach’s HONEYBADGER taking the silver, while Ryan McKillen’s SURGE grabbed the bronze.

    For Matt Schubert’s BAYHEAD (Annapolis, MD) in the 23-boat J/22 fleet, 4 points separated him and former college rival J.R. Maxwell’s SCOOBY (Annapolis, MD) heading into the final race. In the end, Schubert came out on top. “A bunch of people were in the mix,” said Schubert. “It seemed like a lot of them were so fixated on getting out of the current that they missed a few windshifts, so we did a good job of staying in phase and keeping in the pressure.”

    Maxwell had been putting pressure on Schubert the entire series, and continued to do so to the end. “When we rounded the last mark heading up to the finish we knew we had it locked up,” said Schubert. “There was a big gap between us and the third-place boat, so we took a breath and pushed on to the finish. J.R tried to tack on top of us and steal our wind a few times, but we it wasn’t anything we couldn’t handle.”

    Rounding out the podium seven points behind was Todd Hiller’s ESCAPE from Annapolis, MD.

    James Sagerholm (Annapolis, MD) sailed his boat, AUNT JEAN, to five race wins in the four-boat J/35 fleet. “It was a lot closer than it looks on paper,” said Sagerholm. “We won a few of those races by less than a foot.”

    A veteran of the J/35 class, Sagerholm has been racing his boat since 1985. His accomplishments include wins at many past Annapolis NOOD regattas and the J/35 North American Championships. “It’s great having this event come into town every year. There’s a bunch of J/35s in the area, so this is a good chance for us to get out and race.”

    Behind the five-time winner in second was Roger Lant’s ABIENTOT, the only other boat to win a race off AUNT JEAN! Third place with nearly all podium finishes was Bruce Artman’s T-BONE.

    In the J/105 fleet, Peter McChesney (Annapolis, MD) closed out the regatta with a first and a second to take the championship. “We sailed clean, played the shifts, and had an overall conservative last day,” said McChesney. “We didn’t do anything fancy. Our goal was to get two solid scores to finish it.”

    The victory marks a reunion for McChesney’s crewmates, who sailed with each other for more years than they would like to admit.

    “It means a lot to us to be able to come here and perform at the NOOD,” he said. “We had a lot of fun both on and off the water, and the conditions offered plenty of challenges. Our strategy was to stay out of trouble and start in the middle of the line. We have good boatspeed so we never had to do anything crazy to be in the mix. Once we started the last race clean, we knew we were going to win.”

    Behind McChesney’s DOG HOUSE crew was Cedric Lewis & Fredrik Salvesen’s MIRAGE in second and Hugh Bethell’s JESTER in third position.

    Winning the J/24 class of nine-boats for the “umpteenth” time was Tony Parker’s BANGOR PACKET. A regular on the J/24 circuit since 1978 (40+ years!), no one is going to teach ever popular “wiseman of the sea” Parker any new tricks! In fact, he’s often dispensing wisdom to the younger members of the class. Behind BANGOR PACKET, it was a hard fought battle for the silver that was, ultimately, determined on a tie-breaker at 27 pts each. In the end, it was Pete Kassal’s SPACEMAN SPIFF winning the countback over James Bonham’s SISU.

    Continuing to extend their lead in the 13-boat J/30 class after the first two days was Doug and Amy Stryker’s TOTALED MAYHEM, closing the regatta with an emphatic scoreline of 1-1 to win by 6 pts. Taking the silver was Bob Rutsch and Mike Costello’s BEPOP, a past winner of the regatta.  And, collecting the bronze was Bruce Irvin’s SHAMROCK another six points back.

    The J/111 class has near-parity on boat speed for most of the eight-boat fleet, and that dynamic showed in the results.  Even though they were leading for the first two days, Peter Wagner’s San Francisco team on SKELETON KEY had to continuously recover from being down in the fleet, aggressively tacking and gybing on shifts to claw their way back to the top of the standings.  Finishes in this class often had two or more boats overlapped crossing the finish line.  In the end, SKELETON KEY reveled in the breezier conditions on the last day and posted a 1-1 to win the class with 14 pts total.  Consistently chasing them hard was Rob Ruhlman’s SPACEMAN SPIFF, a family crew from Cleveland, OH.  They, too, loved the breezier finale, posting a 2-2 to take the silver.  The podium was rounded out by a local Annapolis team that is often at the top of the leaderboard- Jim Connelly’s SLUSH FUND.  Sailing photo credits- Paul Todd/ Outside Images.  For more Helly Hansen Annapolis NOOD Regatta sailing information
     

     
    Stormy German J/70 Sailing League- Act I
    (Starnberg, Germany)- The 2019 Deutsche Segel-Bundesliga started off its season in Starnberg, Germany, on a beautiful Alpine mountain lake in the southern part of the country- the Starnberger See. Thirty-six sailing clubs from across the country participated in somewhat hellish sailing conditions from May 3rd to May 5th. The fleet showed their fighting spirit, having to stave off cold, wet weather (2.0 deg C/ 35 F!) and extreme hailstorms.

    Winning the 1st Bundesliga Division was the Verein Seglerhaus am Wannsee (VSaW) from Berlin and winning the 2nd League was the Blankeneser Segel-Club (BSC) from Hamburg.

    "It was hard! The cold, the hail, and the storm- these were three really exhausting days, because staying power was needed! We are all the more proud, of course, to be able to win the first match of the season! That's what we hope to do again at the next event in Konstanz,” says Jasper Wagner, helmsman of VSaW. Sailing with him as his crew were Felix Bergmann, Elias Rothe and Max Salzwedel.

    After a very close fight to the last race of the event, the Chiemsee Yacht Club and the Bavarian Yacht Club took 2nd and 3rd on the podium, respectively.

    "It was an exciting battle! We trained relatively little, but we improved a lot over the four days and gave it everything we could!,” said the helmsman from Lake Chiemsee, Leopold Fricke.  His team included Moritz Fricke, Lorenz Huber and Simon Tripp.

    In the 2nd Bundesliga Division, the team from Blankeneser Segel-Club prevailed against tough competition. Their winning crew consisted of Claas Lehmann, Florian Dzsiesiaty, Justus Kellner and Valentin Zeller. Second place went to the Hamburg Segel-Club with the only all-women’s crew in event, and then taking third place was the Potsdam Yacht Club.

    In two weeks (May 17 to 19, 2018), the next event of the 1st and 2nd sailing Bundesliga will take place on Lake Constance, hosted by the Konstanzer Yacht Club.  Watch exciting sailing highlights of the Starnberg J/70 event here  For more Deutsche Segel-Bundesliga sailing information
     

     
    Cold, Windy MAIOR Cup Regatta
    (Kiel, Germany)- Hosted by Kieler YC in Kiel-Schilksee, Germany, the MAIOR CUP Regatta took place from May 3rd to 5th in similar cold, wet, windy sailing conditions as did the Bundesliga down in southern Germany. The one-design fleets of J/70s and J/80s were participating in their first major regatta of the season and they were certainly put to the test, straining both boats and humans to the brink of exhaustion.

    Day One- Cold, Wet & Wild
    On the first day, it was cold in the Kiel Fjord and it blew hard- 20 to 25 kts all day with big seas. As the offshore crews struggled on the long haul outside course, the J/70 and J/80 classes fought close to land.

    "Turning right in front of the harbor entrance was quite unusual," said J/80 skipper Martin Menzner. “As a result, we were so far inside, we had smoother water than the guys outside.”

    After three races, Menzner’s PIKE crew had a 1-2-1 to be one point ahead of Arne Wilcken’s DIVA. Menzner joked, “Arne is the reason why I've exchanged half of my crew for this year! Thank goodness for my new crew members- Lars Keilwitz and Hannes Renzsch- they worked well with me and our other crew- Nils Berltermann!”

    In the J/70 class, Charlotte Braun-Dullaeus’ crew on JINTO (Tobias Strenge, Florian Herrmann, Terje Klockemann) sailed fast and furious, winning the first race and ending the day with a 3-2 to lead the regatta by a point.  Just behind her was Gerd Knospe’s SANNA R in second and Hauke Thilow’s GER 1079 in third.

    Day Two- More Demanding Conditions
    Although the wind had slowed slightly compared to the start on Friday, the wind was shiftier and puffier, more extreme in fact. Again, the J/70s and J/80s had their course tucked in close to land in flatter water, but the puffs were more extreme!

    “Of course, it was important to be in the right place at the right time," said Nils Beltermann, a crewman on Menzner’s PIKE. "We have done well today and are leading, but only by three points!  Our friend DIVA is fast and does not give up!”

    In the J/70 class, Charlotte Braun-Dullaeus drove JINTO fast and on to the top of the leaderboard with a strong series of races for the day- a 1-4-2-1-2. She displaced the Berlin crew on SANNA R, dropping them into second.  The big move of the day was Tania Tammling’s all-women crew from Hamburg that sailed ALBIS into third place by the end of the day with a blazing hot 4-2-3-2! Her crew consisted of Kristin Mertner, Carlotta Meewes, Ragna Thonnessen, and Franziska Wilckens.

    Day 3- Blessed Sun Shines
    Sunday provided the perfect atmosphere for the final day of the regatta; sun, moderate breeze, clear skies, and much warmer temperatures. Smiles all around the docks as people hopped aboard their boats for just two more races to complete the regatta.

    "It was very tricky on Sunday," said J/80 class winning skipper Martin Menzner. “We are thankful that we had three very good days of sailing, we sailed well, no dramas, and finished well. My new team was good all-around!“  Taking second in the J/80s was Arne Wilcken’s DIVA and third was Hauke Kruss’ TAK FOR TUREN.

    There was a lot of drama in the J/70 class.  Having scored four 1sts in the first eight races, it was anyone’s guess that Knospe’s SANNA R crew could repeat those performances on the final day. In the first race, SANNA R did just that, winning it while JINTO took third, closing to within one point of Charlotte’s team.  However, in the last race, Charlotte sailed fast, stayed out of trouble, and scored a deuce, while SANNA R finished right behind them. As a result, Charlotte and her crew on JINTO jumped for joy, breathing a sigh of relief as they won the regatta with 17 pts net. Knospe’s SANNA R took second with 19 pts net and Tammling’s all-women team on ALBIS took the bronze (also winning the Helga Cup Special Award for best women’s team).

    "That was very exciting and close. We actually had a plan to decide what we would do in the penultimate race, but that did not work," said JINTO’s skipper Charlotte Braun-Dullaeus. "Our advantage was that we sailed very consistently, even on Sunday, which was probably the most demanding sailing day. It was really hard to judge some things, especially crossing situations upwind. We’re happy to win and thank my amazing crew!”  Watch a nice sailing highlights video of the MAIOR CUP Regatta here  For more MAIOR CUP Regatta sailing information
     

     
    Pretty, Challenging Race to the Straits
    (Seattle, WA)- “This past weekend’s Sloop Tavern YC “Race to the Straits” was yet another not-to-be missed event- it is all singlehanded or doublehanded teams. Saturday’s leg to Port Townsend was a light wind, current-plagued challenge, with a lot of did not finishes. Sunday’s leg back was with plenty of breeze from the north, spinnakers flying and smiles all around,” said Kurt Hoehne from Sailish.com.

    “Of all the great aspects of this race,” continued Hoehne, ”my favorite is that it draws a whole lot of boats that “don’t” race out to race. There are couples, dogs, kids, cruisers and sails of every imaginable and unimaginable condition. Win or lose, it always appears to be a good time. And, with the staggered start (figuring handicaps into the start time) it seems to make the whole thing about results more palatable. It is what racing should be. On Saturday, it was a day for concentration and a lot of tacks. One skipper estimated he did 60 tacks! On Sunday, the boats with big spinnakers and long waterlines reveled.”

    A number of J/Teams love doing this event since it is so, sooo laid back. Winning the PHRF Class 4 Singlehanded Flying Sails Division was the J/35 GREAT WHITE sailed by Dan Wierman. Meanwhile, Kevin Callahan’s J/80 NAMASTE took third despite having to take a DNF in Saturday’s race. In PHRF Class 6 Doublehanded division, Scott Galbraith’s J/24 FLYER took fourth. Ulg Georg Gwildis’ J/30 IMPULSIVE also took a fourth in PHRF 8 Class. The two J/27s in PHRF 9 Class both podiumed, Dennis Clark’s LXIII getting silver while Leo Morales’ WIZARD took the bronze.

    In the J/80 one-design class, seven doublehanded teams started but not many finished due to the light airs on Saturday.  Ultimately, David Schutte’s TAJ MAHAL won, followed by Morris Lowitz’s UPROAR in second and Lek Dimarucot’s UNDERDOG in third.

    Christine Nelson’s J/29 SLICK sailed fast, narrowly missing the PHRF 11 Doublehanded Class win by just six minutes after 12 hours of sailing time!  She took the silver quite comfortably.

    The six-boat J/105 doublehanded class always has pretty close racing, even on the point-to-point events.  This time, it was John Aitchison’s MOOSE UNKNOWN that took class honors, followed by Matthew Gardner-Brown’s DULCINEA in second and Sara Billey’s PEER GYNET in third.

    J/crews smoked the PHRF 15 Doublehanded class.  Winning was Kirk Fraser’s J/109 ECLIPSE, with Tad Fairbank’s J/100 SELAH in second, Tyson Varosyan’s J/35 SOLUTION in third, Stu Burnell’s J/109 TANTIVY in fourth, and Tolga Cezik’s J/109 LODOS in seventh.

    Finally, in PHRF 16 Doublehanded class it was Chris & Justin Wolfe’s J/120 SHEARWATER that placed 2nd while the Hinze/ Butler duo on the J/120 HINZITE took fourth position.   Sailing photo credits- Jan Anderson/ Janpix  Follow the Sloop Tavern YC’s sailing events on Facebook here  For more Sloop Tavern YC sailing information
     

     
    Grueling RORC Cervantes Trophy Race
    (Cowes, Isle of Wight, England)- The Royal Ocean Racing Club's Cervantes Trophy Race provided a challenging start to the European season for the RORC Season's Points Championship. A bitter northerly wind, with squalls gusting over 30 knots, produced a challenging race for the impressive fleet of 108 boats. Starting from the Squadron Line, the fleet headed east out of the Solent passing No Man's Land Fort and into the open waters of the English Channel. After passing south of the Nab Channel, the fleet headed east, blast reaching to Owers, followed by an upwind leg to Littlehampton Outfall. Cracking sheets and hoisting downwind sails, the fleet headed south for a 77 mile dead-run across the English Channel. An energy sapping upwind leg of over 20 miles, from Cussy Buoy to the A5 Buoy, further tested the fleet, before a downwind section to the finish.

    The eighteen-boat IRC 2 Class features saw the famous J/133 PINTIA sail yet another strong race.  The duo of Gilles Fournier and Corinne Migraine has won the Cervantes Race several times in the past, both in class as well as fleet overall.  This time, they settled for the silver, missing the class win by just 20 minutes.  Then, Patrice Vidon’s French team on J4F finished just 30 minutes on corrected behind PINTIA to take the bronze!

    In the very large thirty-six boats IRC 4 Class, Robert Nelson’s J/105 BIGFOOT held on to take eighth place, not bad for their doublehanded efforts. In fact, in the IRC Doublehanded Class of 35 boats, BIGFOOT placed sixth.  Sailing photo credits- Rick Tomlinson / Paul Wyeth.  For more RORC Cervantes Trophy sailing information
     

     
    Spirited Yachting Cup Regatta
    (San Diego, CA)- There were plenty of high-fives, handshakes and celebratory cheers back on the docks after the final day of the San Diego Yacht Club’s Yachting Cup. Congratulations were exchanged and camaraderie was shared by all.

    The Yachting Cup perpetual trophy for the J/120 class is covered with winning plaques over the years for Chuck Nichol’s CC RIDER and John Laun’s CAPER. So, it was no surprise to see SDYC Staff Commodore’s John Laun and Chuck Nichols back at the top of the standings battling for another tally on the trophy. This year it was CAPER’s turn, as they won the first three races on their way to the win. Taking third was Ernie Pennell’s MAD MEN.

    “It was a lot of fun. We were able to get good breeze both days up to 11 and 12 knots. We were in the Far Ocean course. It was very shifty and challenging at times, but it worked out well. We’re lucky to come out first in our class,” said Bill Campbell, tactician on CAPER.

    “The first race yesterday [Saturday] stood out to us the most. We got on the water, hit our stride early on, and Bill and John nailed the start. We extended our lead the whole race, and it was really fun,” added Alli Bell, trimmer on CAPER.

    SDYC relies heavily on the local J/105 class to support its signature fall regattas, the International Masters and Lipton Cup regattas. Many of the J/105s used to run those events competed in this year’s Yachting Cup with fleet captain Stewart Cannon’s J-OK finishing on top while winning the final three races of the weekend.  Second was the duo of Driscoll & Hurlburt on the bright orange JUICED and third was Steve & Lucy Howell’s BLINK.

    Jeff Janov’s J/70 MINOR TRHEAT used wins in the last two races to take the class win over Tony Collins’ FLY in a competitive seven race series for the J/70s.  Third was Steve Wyman’s NUNUHUNU, fourth Bruce Cooper’s USA 32 and fifth Kim Kundrak’s USA 206 (she was also the Corinthian division winner).

    David Boatner’s J/35 RIVAL, who was an overall winner at the 2016 Yachting Cup, narrowly won the PHRF C Class with four bullets and two deuces for 8 pts net.  Sailing Photo credits- Mark Albertazzi   For more Yachting Cup San Diego sailing information
     

     
    LA SUPERBA Crowned J/24 European Champion!
    (Patras, Greece)- This coming week the Sailing Club of Patras will be hosting 175+ sailors and thirty-five crews from all around Europe for the 2019 J/24 European Championship. Participating teams come from Great Britain, Germany, Greece, Hungary, and Italy.

    Day 1- Spectacular Windy Day
    Thirty J/24s vied in three races in winds of 15-25 knots to open to 2019 J/24 European Championship, hosted by the Sailing Club of Patras in Greece. Four different nations comprise the top four: Stefan Karsunke’s SCHWERE JUNGS of Germany (5 points), Ignazio Bonanno’s LA SUPERBA of Italy (8 points), Miklos Rauschenberger’s EL NINO of Hungary and Anthimos Nikolaidis’ EVNIKI of Greece (17 points).

    Bonanno’s LA SUPERBA opened the Championship successfully as the breeze started in the mid-teens. Karsunke’s SCHWERE JUNGS and Rauschenberger’s El Nino followed. Nikolaidis’ EVNIKI won race two when the winds began piping up, and both Karsunke and Bonanno kept their claim at the front end of the fleet. Karsunke capped a nearly perfect day with a bullet, ahead of Panagiotis Kampouridis’ JMania and Alexandros Tagaropoulos’ HELLENIC POLICE in Tuesday’s last race.

    Day 2- A Pretty Day on The Med
    Six races have been accomplished at the J/24 European Championship, hosted by the Sailing Club of Patras in Greece. Ignazio Bonanno’s LA SUPERBA of Italy has jumped into first place. With scores of 3,2,3 on Wednesday, and factoring in the discard race (a fourth for them), LA SUPERBA tallies just 12 net points. Anthimos Nikolaidis’ EVNIKI of Greece moved up a spot to second overall (17 points), and fellow countryman Alexandros Tagaropoulos’ HELLENIC POLICE can now be found in third (25 points).

    Winds began at 5-8 knots under blue skies and increased to 10-12 by day’s end for the 30 J/24s.

    Nikolaidis rattled off two bullets in the first two races on Wednesday, shadowed initially by Tagaropoulos and Bonanno, and then again by Bonanno and Dave Hale’s CACOON of Great Britain. Two German teams rocked the day’s final and windiest battle: Lynn Wolgast’s DERBE KERLE and Thomas Cramer’s Jux and Dollerei. Bonanno placed third.

    Day 3- More Breeze, More Sun!
    In nine of 10 scheduled races at the J/24 European Championship, Ignazio Bonanno’s LA SUPERBA consistently placed in the top four. Factoring in one discard for the Series, that leaves the Italian team as European Champions for the second time (they also won in 2012 in their home country), with one race to spare. Retaining scores of only firsts, seconds and thirds, LA SUPERBA scored just 18 pts net!

    Teams battling for the balance of the podium are over 18 points in arrears. Those teams include Anthimos Nikolaidis’ EVNIKI, Alexandros Tagaropoulos’ HELLENIC POLICE, Panagiotis Kampouridis’ J-MANIA and Stefan Karsunke’s SCHWERE JUNGS. The other thirty J/24s conclude racing Friday, with just one race scheduled.

    The top Women’s European Champion contender is Lynn Wolgast’s German all-women crew from the Muhlenberger Segel-Club sailing on DERBE KERLE; she sits in 9th place with 70 pts net.

    Conditions were perfect again on Thursday, with breeze at 10-15 knots, sunny skies and warmer temperatures. Bonanno’s LA SUPERBA notched their second bullet of the series to start the day, tailed by two German teams— Stephan Mais’ RUNNINGMEN and Karsunke’s SCHWERE JUNGS. Kampouridis’ J-MANIA of Greece snagged the win in the day’s middle battle, while Bonanno settled for second and Nikolaidis’ EVNIKI third. Then Kampouridis’ J-MANIA went back-to-back with another victory, ahead of Karsunke and Bonanno. Sailing photo credits: Batistatos Spyros/ Chris Howell   Follow the J/24 European Championship on Facebook here  For more J/24 European Championship sailing information
     

    MERCURY Wins J/80 Cantabrian Championship
    (Santander, Spain)- The Real Club Nautico Santander hosted the 2019 Cantabrian J/80 Championship off their beautiful northern shores of Spain.  There was two great days of sailing in the fabulously beautiful Sardinero Bay. On Saturday it blew from the northwest (300 deg) about 10 knots with a very flat sea. Sunday dawned with a fresh easterly wind with even flatter waters (since it was blowing offshore) and the wind never dropped below 18 kts!

    Many of the famous Spanish J/80 champion sailors were in attendance, such as multiple World Champion- Pichu Torcida.

    After a closely fought six-race series where the top five boats were only separated by six points in the end, it was Jaime Piris’ MERCURY that was declared the Cantabrian J/80 Champion with a total of 12 pts net. Taking second was none other than Ignacio Camino, himself a J/80 World Champion. Then, third was CASTELAR BUILDING, owned by Daniel de la Pedraia, and skippered by Diego Botin (yes, a member of that famous sailing family that is Botin Naval Architects).  Rounding out the top five was Angel Herrerias in fourth and yet another J/80 World Chammpion in 5th place- Jose Maria “Pichu” Torcida.

    Julia Casanueva’s CENTRAL OPTICA, with Eva Gonzalez at the helm, were the Women Champions (they finished 10th overall in the Open Division).  For more J/80 Cantabrian Championship sailing information
     

     
    Blustery American YC Spring Series Finale
    (Rye, NY)- The second and final weekend of the 40th Annual American Yacht Club Spring Series Regatta concluded this past weekend in the same way it started on April 27-28; with challenging weather that included little wind on Saturday and heavy rain and 30 kt gusts on Sunday.

    However, this didn’t prevent excellent performances, as determined sailors on over 70 boats in nine separate boat classes – IRC, PHRF, J/44, J/109, J/88, J/105, J/70, and J/80- toughed it out and got in good racing on western Long Island Sound.

    With two races on Sunday, Mike Bruno’s WINGS placed first in the J/88 division and continued building on a hot streak that dates back to January with a win at the J/88 Midwinter Championship in St. Petersburg, FL. Elizabeth Barry’s team on ESCAPE had sailed strongly the previous weekend, but had a rough time in the rough weather and her 4th place finish in her last race dropped her into a tie with WINGS with 6 pts each, but lost the tie-breaker on most 1sts.  Taking third was Kevin Marks’ VELOCITY.

    WINGS skipper Mike Bruno commented, “it was pretty brutal, rain, low 50s air temp, 44 degree water temp, gusting to 25 kts plus or more in the last race was tough on everyone. One of our competitors pulled their jib cars off the deck, and the Canadians just called it a day, not surprised. We were happy, grateful, to get around the track in the last race to win and also get the series win.”

    In the J/109 Class, Rosow’s LOKI continued their dominating performance, posting a 2nd on the last day to win with just 4 pts net!  By winning the last race, John Greifzu’s GROWTH SPURT leapt into the silver spot, while Robert Schwartz’s NORDLYS placed 4th in the finale to drop into third place. .

    Continuing their amazing string of 2nds was Paul Beaudin’s J/105 LOU LOU. With yet another two 2nds, LOU LOU won with just 7 pts net. John Koten’s GRAY MATTER posted a 6-1 to jump up the leaderboard to grab the silver medal.  Meanwhile, “the kids” on YOUNG AMERICAN dropped off the pace, posting an 11-3 to fall to fifth in the challenging conditions.  Then, David Greenhouse’s SKIPPERDEE had an outstanding day with a 3-4 to grab the bronze position.  Rounding out the top five was David Willis’ SOLUTION in 4th and YOUNG AMERICAN 5th.

    In the J/70s, Dan Goldberg’s BAZINGA barely held on to their lead to win by a point.  It was the hard-charging duo of Carrie & Ed Austin’s CHINOOK that posted double bullets to nearly pull off a surprise win on Sunday.  Third was J-RHINO.

    The East Course saw Commodore Ketcham maintain their lead in the J/44 fleet to take the class win with 8 pts net. Reveling in the rough conditions was Don & Dick Rave’s RESOLUTE, firing on all cylinders to post a 1-2-1 scoreline Sunday and grab the silver. Just behind them was Len Sitar’s VAMP in third position.

    In the PHRF Racing division, Scott Devine’s brand new J/112E REVIVER closed with a smoking hot 2-2 as they prepared for their summer season of racing.  Meanwhile, Ron Richman’s J/133 ANTIDOTE closed the regatta in fourth place. Finally, in the PHRF Plus One division, Steven Levy’s J/121 EAGLE took second place.  For more American YC Spring Series sailing information
     

     
    Gorgeous Antigua Sailing Week
    J/122 Wins Winter Circuit, J/11S Crushes Class
    (English Harbour, Antigua)- The 52nd edition of Antigua Sailing Week will be remembered for a cocktail of superb sailing, thrilling racing and a great party atmosphere ashore. Teams from 21 different countries from all over the world chose Antigua Sailing Week as their destination. The trade winds blew for all six days of racing; mixed in with tropical heat and a rollercoaster ride of Caribbean swell, Antigua delivered world class sailing. Racing was incredibly close with the majority of the classes enjoying thrilling competition. New marks introduced provided the opportunity for longer coastal courses, allowing the boats to stretch their legs and take in the beautiful west and rugged east coasts of Antigua. The introduction of new top and bottom marks on the Windward Course allowed for better windward-leeward race tracks, testing the technical abilities of the international fleet.

    In CSA Racing 4 Class, Pamala Baldwin’s Antiguan J/122 LIQUID continued their epic performance through the course of the winter season, closing their 2019 Caribbean Winter Series in 1st place and taking second place in Antigua; she also won the CSA Travellers’ Trophy! The Peruvian crew on the J/122 INKA TEAM, skippered by Diego Aguirre, closed the regatta strongly, posting a 2-4-3 in the last three races to finish in 4th place.

    CSA Racing 5 Class featured close racing with races won or lost by seconds. But, it was Jonty and Vicki Layfield’s Antiguan J/11s SLEEPER that battled to a class win with six 1sts and two 2nds to win by a large margin.  SLEEP not only won the Governor General’s Cup, but also awarded Best Caribbean and Best Antiguan Yacht!

    “It’s been brilliant, with so much wind!” commented SLEEPER’s Vicki Layfield. “The team has sailed together for years and this week we have performed well. Young Shannoy Malone has been sailing with us for five years and he is only 11, but really contributes to how the boat sails.”

    Jonty said; "We are very pleased as we had stiff competition from Sir Richard Mathew’s boat Holding Pattern that included some very good professional sailors, including Saskia Clark and Andy Green. The wind conditions all week were in the high teens and with the single rudder she really performs well. We also won ‘best Caribbean boat’ and the ‘Royal Southern Challenge Cup’, beating Scarlet Oyster, which is no mean feat. We were the best J/Boat beating two J/122s, a J/120, a J/145, and J/30. Also, we just missed out on winning the coveted Lord Nelson Trophy by a fraction of a point to Sojana, so this means that we were second overall out of 50 odd boats in Sailing Week."

    Ben Jelic’s J/120 JAGUAR also closed nicely, posting a 3-3-2 in the final three races to snag the fourth spot, just two points shy of the podium!

    Finally, in CSA Racing 6 Class, Tanner Jones on the J/30 BLUE PETER/ CARIBBEAN ALLIANCE INSURANCE also sailed well in the closing races to place 5th.  For more Antigua Sailing Week sailing information
     

     
    J/88 JUNIPER Wins New Zealand Offshore Series
    (Auckland, New Zealand)- From New Zealand's stunning Auckland Waitemata Harbour comes some great news, the new J/88 JUNIPER takes the 1st prize in the Club Marine Wednesday night offshore series in the C Light Division on General Handicap. The series is organized by the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron (RNZYS), home of the America’s Cup. The series starts in October and runs every two weeks on Wednesday night until end of March. This was the first racing season for the new J/88 JUNIPER that was launched in July of 2018.

    “The news is more impressive than first meets the eye,” said Ray Entwistle of Yachtspot (J/Boats Australia and NZ). “The owner- Lode Missiaen- is new to the area only having moved to New Zealand just 18 months ago.  For him, it’s a new area to learn, a new boat to master, putting a new crew together, and compete against some very well established competitive crews and boats that are well-versed in the harbour’s local conditions.”

    The sailing conditions in the Hauraki gulf are challenging; with winds going from light to very strong (up to 30 knots), sometimes in a single race, tidal streams with local currents (local knowledge!), large and frequent wind shifts during the race, and mostly flat water, but choppy at times.

    The J/88 took the varied conditions in her stride. JUNIPER is equipped with the five standard J/88 class sails: one main and two jibs (3Di Raw North Sails), an A2 Runner and A3 Reacher. The courses of the races are random-leg harbour courses, not windward-leeward courses, which is a challenge on close reaching legs where they cannot use the gennaker.  Nevertheless, with good trim, JUNIPER performed exceptionally well; often sailing as fast as some of the larger and lighter boats in the fleet with bigger sail wardrobes. They tuned the rig over the season to meet local conditions, especially on the windier days.

    “We are having a great time here sailing in the beautiful Hauraki gulf,” says skipper Lode Missiaen. “I wish to thank the RNZYS for organizing the club series, our competitors for pushing us, and, of course, my crew for the great dedication and teamwork.  Newcomer JUNIPER has certainly gotten some attention in Auckland, and we can only hope that more J/88 boats will join us soon in this beautiful part of the world.”  For more J/88 offshore speedster sailing information
     

    J/Community
    What friends, alumni, and crew of J/Boats are doing worldwide
    -----------
     
    “Here is some onboard footage at the wet and wild 2019 edition of the Sloop Tavern's Blakely Rock Benefit Race. The J/125 HAMACHI loved the heavy weather both upwind and downwind, hitting 16’s all the time on the knotmeter!  Got first in class and first overall boat to finish!,” said Jason Andrews.

    https://youtu.be/kgL6OTZlMsE Add to Flipboard Magazine.

    Read more...
  • J/Newsletter- May 1st, 2019 J/Sailing News

    The Sun Never Sets on J's Sailing Worldwide

    Last week, one of the most popular offshore races on the Pacific coast of America, the Newport to Ensenada Race, encountered similar conditions that many of the boats experienced a few weeks earlier in the famous 800nm Cabo San Lucas Race— light airs!  Nevertheless, while slow in the beginning, as the “sprint race” progressed down the coast from California to Mexico, the breeze finally kicked in with most boats finishing with a sunny, warm windy day.

    Over in the Caribbean, the 100+ boat fleet sailing the Antigua Sailing Week have enjoyed simply “Supercalifragilistic” fantastic sailing conditions all week. Good breezes, plenty of sun, and amazing parties every evening, what’s not to like about that “bucket list” event that marks the end of the Caribbean winter sailing season?

    Further north, the American Yacht Club hosted the first weekend of their two-weekend annual AYC Spring Series for fleets of PHRF/ ORR handicap boats as well as one-design fleets of J/70s, J/80s, J/88s, J/105s, J/109s, and J/44s.

    Over on the Eurasian continent, the Warsash Spring Series concluded their Spring Championship Weekend event and continued with their Black/White Group series for IRC racers and one-design fleets of J/70s, J88s, and J/109s.

    Finally, the Russian National J/70 Sailing League has concluded their second set of “stages” for their various series- the Supreme, Premiere, and Qualifying series for a total of FORTY sailing teams/ clubs from across their vast Federation.
     

    Annapolis NOOD Regatta Preview
    (Annapolis, MD)- The first major regatta of the 2019 Chesapeake Bay sailing season is ready to roll this coming “Cinco de Mayo” weekend- the Helly Hansen Annapolis NOOD Regatta hosted by Annapolis YC. As one of the largest of Sailing World’s NOOD Regattas held nationwide, the Annapolis event also ranks as the one perhaps most dominated by the various J/One-design classes- 130 J’s in an overall fleet of 178 boats (or about 73.0%)!  Sailing one-design will be J/22s, J/24s, J/70s, J/80s, J/30s, J/35s, J/105s and J/111s.

    The twenty-one boat J/22 class always promises great competition on Chesapeake Bay. Several class veterans are participating, including notables like Sandy Adzick’s HOT TICKET, Chris Doyle’s THE JUG 4 1, Cate Muller’s THUNDER CHICKEN, and Chris Wilson’s LIL’PUFFY.

    The J/24s have a seven-boat field that includes Tony Parker’s famous BANGOR PACKET, Pat Fitzgerald’s RUSH HOUR, and Pete Kassal’s SPACEMAN SPIFF.

    With thirty-one boats on the starting line, the J/70s have the largest fleet at the regatta. Leading teams may include Geoff Becker’s HELLY HANSEN JUNIOR CREW, Travis Odenbach’s HONEYBADGER, Glenn Darden’s HOSS, Ray Wulff’s JOINT CUSTODY, Bruce Golison’s MIDLIFE CRISIS, Brian Keane’s SAVASANA, and three Brazilian teams from Rio de Janeiro (Mario Sorensen Garcia’s MANDACHUVA, Pedro Camargo’s MANCHA NEGRA, Flavio Andrade’s OCEANPACT).

    At twenty-three boats, the J/80 class is seeing one of its best turn-outs in recent years. Watch for these teams to be amongst the leaders; Bert Carp’s ELEVEN, Les Beckwith’s FKA, Tom Kopp’s KOPP-OUT, Mike Hobson’s MELTEMI, and David Andril’s VAYU.

    There are a dozen-boats sailing in the J/30 class; an amazing turn-out for this historical class (the 2nd design ever by designer Rod Johnstone!).  The leading teams include Bob Rutsch & Mike Costello’s BEPOP, Jim McGinnis’ BLITZ, Pam Morris’ BUMP, Rob & Beth Lundahl’s RAG DOLL, and Heidi Frist’s SUZIE Q.

    The third oldest class in the regatta is the J/35s, with a seven boats ready to do battle for class honors over the three days of sailing.  One wonders, will it be a “wash, rinse, repeat” from past years?  The infamous duo of Jim Sagerholm & Jerry Christofel’s AUNT JEAN defending their title in four previous events over good teams like David Lange’s FATAL ATTRACTION and Bruce Artman’s T-BONE?  Watch this space!

    With one of the largest J/105 fleets in the world, the Chesapeake J/105 fleet will again see eighteen boats pointing their bows towards the starting line. This year will see a diverse, strong group of teams from across the spectrum of 105 teams, including two from Texas! Those crews that should factor on the leaderboard are Andrew Kennedy’s BAT IV, Ben duPont’s CTRL ALT DEL, Bill Zartler’s DEJA VOODOO, Peter McChesney’s DOG HOUSE, Donald Santa’s SANTAS REIGN DEAR, Scott Gitchell’s TENACIOUS, and Mark Masur’s TWO FEATHERS.

    Eight J/111 teams from across the country (San Francisco, New York, Cleveland, Buzzards Bay) will be vying for class honors.  J/111 World Champion Peter Wagner and crew on SKELETON KEY from St Francis YC will again be challenged by several hot teams. The top “locals” include Marty Roesch’s VELOCITY and Jim Connelly’s SLUSH FUND (3rd at the 2017 Worlds). The two-times J/111 Midwinter Champion Rob Ruhlman and crew on SPACEMAN SPIFF from Cleveland, OH will also be looking forward to engaging those top teams. As well, two leading northeastern teams, both Block Island Race Week Champions, will be participating- Sedge Ward’s BRAVO and Doug Curtiss’ WICKED 2.0.

    In the North Sails Rally that takes place on Saturday will be two boats- Dan Leonard’s J/100 FLASHPOINT and Nicholas Illiff’s J/105 MUSKRAT. Sailing photo credits- Paul Todd / Outside Images.  For more Helly Hansen Annapolis NOOD Regatta sailing information
     

     
    RORC Cervantes Trophy Race Preview
    (Cowes, Isle of Wight, England)- 115 yachts have entered the Royal Ocean Racing Club's Cervantes Trophy Race, with more than 600 sailors registered to take part. The 110nm to 160nm race from the Solent to Le Havre will start from the Royal Yacht Squadron Line on Saturday 4th May at 0900 BST. Spectators can watch the spectacle from the Cowes Parade and The Green, and also follow the progress of the fleet via the RORC website. Competitors will receive a warm welcome at Société des Regates du Havre, founded in 1838; it is the oldest yacht club in continental Europe.

    The opening European fixture of the 2019 RORC Season's Points Championship, is the third race of the world's largest offshore racing championship, with in excess of 600 yachts expected to take part over the course of the season. The majority of the teams racing are Corinthian sailors, who will be taking on some top professional teams during the series. More often than not, an amateur team, with the skill, tenacity, and determination to succeed, wins the championship.

    Teams will be racing for the Cervantes Trophy for the best-corrected time under IRC. Gilles Fournier and Corinne Migraine's J/133 PINTIA will be attempting to win the Cervantes Trophy for the fourth year in a row. The race to Le Havre is a special one for PINTIA; Gilles has been a member of the Société des Regates du Havre for over 60 years.

    “We really do not know if we will win, but we will compete for sure,” smiled Gilles Fournier. “We have a good crew and we will do our best, but we know that the competition will be very good. It is wonderful to hear that so many sailors will be racing to Le Havre, and we hope that many of them will enjoy the facilities at the club.”

    In the fifteen-boat IRC 1 Class will be two J/121s, Mike O’Donnell’s DARKWOOD and Nick Angel’s ROCK LOBSTER. They are up against a formidable contingent of the offshore European wars, such as the custom Ker 40s Keronimo and Hooligan VII.

    The eighteen-boat IRC 2 Class features Fournier’s J/133 PINTIA as well as two J/111s- Simon Grier-Jones’ British crew on SNOW LEOPARD and Patrice Vidon’s French team on J4F.

    The very large IRC 3 Class of thirty-three boats features a cast of villains and characters in both the French and English offshore community.  Six J/109s are ready to do battle (such as Christopher Preston’s JUBILEE, the Royal Air Force RED ARROW, and Chris Burleigh’s JYBE TALKIN’) as well as two J/105s (Tom Hayhoe & Natalie Jobling’s MOSTLY HARMLESS and Ross Farrow’s JACANA).

    Similarly, the also very big thirty-six boat IRC 4 Class has just Robert Nelson’s J/105 BIGFOOT hoping to carry the day for J/sailors…which they have done before, winning class in the past!

    The third class with 30+ entries includes the IRC Doublehanded class of thirty-five boats.  J/duets include Chris Preston’s J/109 JUBILEE, Alistair Doughty’s J/109 JELENKO, Jerry Freeman’s J/105 JULIETTE, and  Robert Nelson’s J/105 BIGFOOT.  Sailing photo credits- Rick Tomlinson / Paul Wyeth   For more RORC Cervantes Trophy sailing information
     

    Yachting Cup Regatta Preview
    (San Diego, CA)- San Diego Yacht Club is proud to host the 2019 Yachting Cup, scheduled for Friday, May 3rd to Sunday, May 5th. Buoy Racing will take place on the Coronado Roads ocean venues, South San Diego Bay, and random-leg handicap racing in San Diego Bay. Not surprisingly, the passionate and enthusiastic J/sailors are looking forward to their next major venue on their Southern California yachting calendar.

    The weather in “SoCal” has not been normal, to say the least. Maybe there is something to the “climate change” scenarios unfolding across our little blue-green pinball in the midst of the intergalactic ocean of space dust, super novas, random asteroids, and a few gazillion planets.

    The three J/one-design classes are always competitive in this event.  In the nine-boat J/105 class, watch out for Jon Dekker’s AIR BOSS, Steve & Lucy Howell’s BLINK, Driscoll/ Hurlburt’s JUICED, and Stew Cannon’s J-OK to be somewhere near the top of the leaderboard.

    Similarly, it’s always a question of “who’s on first” for the first major regatta of the season for the J/120 class. Some are well-practiced, some are not. Some will be on their game, other’s not. In any event, the protagonists in this Shakespearean drama should be John Laun’s CAPER, John Snook’s JIM, Ernie Pennell’s MAD MEN, and Chuck Nichols CC RIDER; all have won something major over the years!

    The nine-boat J/70 class has enjoyed strong competition over the past few years. Those guiding lights include Steve Wyman’s NUNUHUNU, Jeff Janov’s MINOR THREAT, and Pat Danly’s BOONDOGLE.  For more Yachting Cup San Diego sailing information
     

     
    J/24 European Championship Preview
    (Patras, Greece)- This coming week the Sailing Club of Patras will be hosting 175+ sailors and thirty-five crews from all around Europe for the 2019 J/24 European Championship. Participating teams come from Great Britain, Germany, Greece, Hungary, and Italy.

    The leading crews may include Stefan Karsunke’s SCHWERE JUNGS and Jan Kahler’s UNITED 5 from Germany, and Paolo Rinaldi’s AMERICAN PASSAGE, Fabio Apollonio’s J-OC ALCE NERO, and Ignazio Bonanno’s LA SUPERBA.   Follow the J/24 European Championship on Facebook here   For more J/24 European Championship sailing information
     

    Regatta & Show Schedules:

    Mar 17- Apr 28- Warsash Spring Series- Warsash, England
    May 3-5- Annapolis NOOD Regatta- Annapolis, MD
    May 3-5- Yachting Cup Regatta- San Diego, CA
    May 4-10- J/24 European Championship- Patras, Greece
    May 4- RORC Cervantes Cup Race- Cowes, England
    May 9-12- SAILING Champions League- Palma Mallorca, Spain
    May 10-12- Grand Prix de St Cast- St Cast, France
    May 10-12- RORC Vice Admiral’s Cup- Cowes, England
    May 17-18- J/121 Spring Tune-Up- Newport, RI
    Jun 8-9- Lady Liberty Cup J/24 Regatta- New York Harbor, NY

    For additional J/Regatta and Event dates in your region, please refer to the on-line J/Sailing Calendar.

     
    J/Crews Collect Newport to Ensenada Race Silver!
    (Newport Beach, CA)- Remarkably, the second major event of the Southern California offshore season also started off with a whimper. This year’s Newport to Ensenada Race was not the “fast forward” downwind sleigh ride of year’s past.  Instead, it started off quite light, especially overnight, but then as the fleet made their way down the coastline the onshore sea breezes and northerly flows kicked in for a sunny, breezy finish for most boats.

    The legendary 125nm “wind sprint” that starts off the piers at Newport Beach, CA is a simple race course; after the start, just head south down the California/ Mexican coastline to a finish inside Toto Santos Bay, off the lovely Hotel Coral & Marina in Ensenada.

    The 72nd annual edition of the race was perhaps most frustrating for the “maxi’s and the fleet of ULDB 70s.  However, for the mid-size boats in the 35 to 45 foot range, it all worked out quite well on handicap scoring; in particular, for many of the dozen J/Teams.

    One of the leading navigators described this year’s event: “the race was tricky as heck, but we just looked to sail the shortest possible course, going just outside the Coronado’s for a bit, then jibed into shore and staying left. VMG all the way and just drive.”

    For many in the light winds race, finding VMG (Velocity Made Good) was the difference between winning or ending up experiencing VNDG (Velocity No Dang Good) instead.

    Commenting on their second place finish on their second offshore outing on the brand new J/121 BLUE FLASH was owner Scott Grealish:

    “We knew we had a bad start. And, it's obvious we were slow the first hour. I think the combination of being short handed with two new guys affected us; so, we were not quick off the line, setting the zero, etc. Plus, we are still learning how to trim that setup.  We improved and gained over the next few hours with no real condition changes.

    In the end, we took second in class to the Andrews 40 by four minutes corrected. They beat us in the Cabo Race, too (first overall), so we respect their program.

    Our eleven-boat class sailed in light 0-10.0 kts TWS and all Code Zero/ A1 spinnaker sailing conditions. We all finished within 2% on our elapsed times! Incredibly, a pretty well-sailed offshore fleet!

    We sailed with four and found the water ballast very useful on the small zero at 8.0 kts TWS, 80-105 TWA. We think the staysail under the Code Zero is slower at 6-8.0 kts TWS. But, we never got more wind to really test this combination further.

    There was a “Catalina Eddy” sailing condition during the night. That meant there was a periodic phasing of colder, stronger breeze forward from offshore; followed by warmer, lighter gradient veered breeze (60 degrees!)! So, we sailed the A1 spinnaker in both VMG mode and hotter sailing angle modes (the phases were too quick to merit gybing with two on deck, but fully crewed we would've). During daylight, we got to two boat test-sail against the Farr 40s, trying both modes.

    Our take-away was that the J/121 can be fast sailed deep on the A1 (TWA 148-152, TWS 6-8 kts) with all weight forward and two crew to leeward. Paradoxically, this reverses at TWS 9-10 kts, where hotter angles are better.”

    Meanwhile, Terri Manok’s all-female team on the J/120 POLE DANCER also had a successful offshore experience on their way to Ensenada. Her crew members were American, Irish, Canadian, and a New Zealander. They won the Caroline Starr Trophy for Best Corrected All Female Crew as well as the Carlos Avila Escoto Trophy for the Best Corrected J/120.

    “We stayed out of the fray and got a good start,” said Manok. “It was a long race, but had a wonderful group of ladies to sail with. And, we had fun!”

    “The girls” on Manok’s POLE DANCER persevered, stuck to their guns, and pulled off a podium finish against a large class of veteran offshore racers, taking the bronze in the PHRF A Spinnaker class, just 20 minutes from silver! You go girls, great sailing!

    Rudolph Hasl’s crew from San Diego YC sailed their J/145 PALAEMON in the PHRF ULDB A Class and, despite the light, shifty, streaky winds, pulled off a 4th place in a fleet filled with all-carbon offshore racers- mostly super-fast TP52s.

    Then, in PHRF ULDB C Class, Doug & Jack Jorgensen’s J/111 PICOSA got on the podium by taking 3rd in class, while Seth Hall’s J/124 MARISOL took fourth.  That was a great result for both boats in the 24-hour sprint down the Mexican coastline. 

    In PHRF ULDB D Class, Juan Lois’ J/105 ROCINANTE won class honors while fellow stablemates, Brian Kerr’s J/92 DOUBLE DOWN took the silver; a great celebration was had by these two J/teams at the top of the podium!

    In the shorter Newport to San Diego Race (the “sunset sail”), Robert Pace’s J/145 ANDIAMO 2 took the bronze in the PHRF A class of fifteen boats, the largest of any class in the entire event!

    In the even shorter Newport to Dana Point Race (the “day sail”), it was a near clean sweep of the top five by J/Crews!  Winning was Jock McGraw’s J/22 TEKEELA, followed by Charles Brewer’s J/124 HEARTBEAT 4 in third place, Marty Henehan’s J/92 FIREWATER in 4th place, and taking 6th place was the Newport Harbor YC’s youth team on the J/70 SLOOP JOHN B, skippered by Tom Garret.  Sailing photo credits-   Tom Walker   Jeff Granberry   For more Newport to Ensenada Race sailing information
     

     
    American YC Spring Series- Weekend I
    (Rye, NY)- American Yacht Club hosted the first weekend of the 2019 Spring Series, a two-weekend regatta, which included competitors from across the East Coast with over seventy boats. Competing in this year's regatta were nine separate boat classes-- IRC, PHRF, J/44, J/109, J/88, J/105, J/70 and J/80. The J/105s featured the largest fleet with 14 boats. Three races were held in all divisions.

    Sunday racing brought a light to moderate 5 to 15 kts breeze from the north/ northeast that made for a great day of sailing after heavy winds prevented racing on Saturday. Both courses started races on time and, despite the cool and drizzly conditions, the gentle breezes helped make for a great day of sailing.

    David Rosow’s J/109 LOKI, Daniel Goldberg’s J/70 BAZINGA and Jason Viseltear’s J/80 UPSETTER all mastered the South Course with three first-place finishes each and wrapped up the weekend atop their Class standings. Past AYC Commodore Mike Bruno sailed steadily on his J/88 WINGS and ended the weekend in second place following a first-place finish in Race 3.

    In the J/109 Class, behind Rosow’s LOKI is Robert Schwartz’s NORDLYS in second place and John Greifzu’s GROWTH SPURT in third.

    Elizabeth Barry’s team on the J/88 ESCAPE has sailed strongly and her 1-1-2 tally leads the J/88s by a good margin.  Second is Bruno’s WINGS, tied on points with Kevin Marks’ VELOCITY.

    Paul Beaudin’s J/105 LOU LOU has a commanding lead in the J/105 class with a 2-1-2.  Second is David Willis’ SOLUTION with a 7-2-6 while “the kids” on the YOUNG AMERICAN Team won the first race and closed with a 7-10 to sit in third in a three-way tie.  Tied with “the kids” is Jeremy Henderson & Harald Edegran’s CONUNDRUM with a 9-8-1 and John Koten’s GRAY MATTER with a 5-10-3.

    In the J/70s, behind BAZINGA is Carrie & Ed Austin’s CHINOOK with a 2-2-4 record in second and White Rhino Racing sailing J-RHINO to a 3-5-2 to hold on to third place.

    The East Course saw Commodore Ketcham take a commanding lead in the J/44 fleet, while enjoying beautiful big boat sailing conditions and stable wind from the north and northeast. Behind them are Len Sitar’s VAMP in second and Don & Dick Rave’s RESOLUTE in third place.

    In the PHRF Racing division, Ron Richman’s J/133 ANTIDOTE is sitting in second place. And, in the PHRF Plus One division, Steve Levy’s J/121 EAGLE took a second place.

    Sunday also featured many junior sailors on a variety of big boats. On one J/70, four 13-year-old girls enjoyed their first J-sailing racing experience aboard Marshall Saffer's LET IT RIP.

    Overall, it was a successful and fun day on the water. A big thank you to the AYC Race Committee for running excellent races and the safety and rescue teams for helping keep everyone safe on the water. Racing will continue next weekend and AYC looks forward to seeing sailors back for more racing, great food and cold beer!  For more American YC Spring Series sailing information
     

     
    Antigua Sailing Week Report
    J/122 LIQUID Wins Round Island Race!
    (English Harbour, Antigua)- More than 100 boats from 21 countries worldwide have been sailing in the nine-day festival of racing and shoreside events that is Antigua Sailing Week, the Caribbean’s longest running regatta.

    Fifty-four yachts are sailing in the CSA Racing Classes and, so far, silverware is already being collected by top J/Crews.

    In the 53.0nm Round Antigua Race, Pamala Baldwin’s J/122 LIQUID continues on a roll after their victory in Voiles de St Barths.  They placed second CSA Racing overall in the fleet of thirty-five yachts and easily won CSA 2 class ahead of two well-sailed teams.

    “We didn’t really sail to our potential, but we came in first place for our class,” noted Baldwin. “There is plenty to come from Liquid because it’s a great crew. We have come in on podium the whole season and we are definitely here to sail hard this week, work her really hard on our home at Antigua Sailing Week!”

    Day 1- Perfect Start for Sailing Week
    After the Round Island Race, the fleet was greeted with brilliant sunshine, solid trade winds and Caribbean surf; a perfect way to start the week. The cocktail of heaven-sent conditions was very apt for English Harbour Rum Race Day. The six CSA racing classes were on the Windward Course enjoying some epic downwind legs straight off the front of the brochure!

    In CSA Racing 4 class, Baldwin’s Antiguan J/122 LIQUID took second place, while her sistership, the J/122 TEAM INKA from Peru (skippered by Diego Aguirre) took third.

    In CSA Racing 5 class, Jonty Layfield’s J/11S started off with a 2nd place, followed by Ben Jelic’s J/120 JAGUAR in 6th position.

    The Daily Prize Giving is a big feature of Antigua Sailing Week, it’s where sailors from six continents mingle after racing at Antigua Yacht Club to applaud the day’s winners and watch the video action. Live music from The Climax Band and English Harbour Rum giveaways made for a perfect end to a cracking start for the Caribbean’s most famous regatta!

    Day 2- More Perfect Sailing
    The second day of Antigua Sailing Week was Fever-Tree Race Day, with the impressive fleet mixing it up in gorgeous weather on the south, east and west coast of Antigua. The Bareboat fleet, Double-Handed and Club Class started off Windward Beach with fresh trade wind in the high teens. The six CSA racing classes raced off Rendezvous Beach on tight round the cans courses with more sheltered but gusty conditions in a packed out race area.

    Red-hot racing in CSA 4 continued. Pamala Baldwin’s Antiguan J/122 LIQUID, skippered by Jules White, won both races by the narrowest of margins to take the class lead by a single point.

    In CSA 5, Jonty and Vicki Layfield’s J/11s SLEEPER scored two bullets today to lead the class by a single point.

    “It is just amazing racing with Sleeper– we hit 15 knots of speed today!” smiled Shannoy Malone, the 11-year old Antiguan who has been racing with the Layfield’s since he was seven and will be competing at the Optimist World Championship to be held in Antigua this summer. “The crew are so friendly and helpful. I am learning so much and racing the boat is a lot of fun. I will never do 15 knots in my Opti, so that was a first for me.”

    Day 3- Just Doesn’t Get Better
    20 knots of trades powered up the action on Reggae in the Park Race Day at Antigua Sailing Week. Two races were held for most classes– the CSA Racing Classes were launched with a full on foam-up on the Windward Course. The Bareboat Classes and Club Class raced short, sharp, windward-leeward courses off Rendezvous Bay.

    In CSA 4, a tie for first place exemplified the intensity of racing in the class, after time correction, between Baldwin’s Antiguan J/122 LIQUID, skippered by Jules White, and another 40 footer. After five races, LIQUID sits in second.

    In CSA 5, Layfield’s Antiguan J/11s SLEEPER racked up two more race wins today to lead the class by three points. Then, after scoring a 3-3, Jelic’s St.Maarten J/120 JAGUAR is challenging the podium.

    After a memorable day racing at Antigua Sailing Week, sailors will join thousands of revelers for the big party night. The UNESCO World Heritage Site, Nelson’s Dockyard has been transformed into a mind-blowing open-air concert theatre. Reggae in the Park is a big-time celebration for the 10th edition of the legendary concert. Nelson’s Dockyard will be alive with headline artist Christopher Martin, performing alongside Junior Kelly. After the big night, what better way to recover than Lay Day at Pigeon Beach tomorrow Wednesday 1st May.  Two more days of racing are left with the regatta concluding on Friday.  Sailing photo credits- Ed Whiting/ Paul Wyeth.  For more Antigua Sailing Week sailing information
     

     
    Warsash Spring Series- Weekend VI Report
    (Warsash, England)- Over this past weekend, the Warsash Sailing Club that has been hosting their annual Helly Hansen Warsash Spring Series, was besieged by the enormous Storm “Hannah” that whipped up a frenzied “foam-up” on Saturday. With winds gusting well into the 30+ knots range, all racing was canceled. However, as Sunday dawned, it was clear it was still quite windy, but it had calmed down enough for the fleet to enjoy great racing on the Southampton Water and the Solent. The weekend marked the completion of the Black & White Championship Weekend.

    Black & White Championship Report
    In the IRC 1 Class, Tony Mack’s J/111 McFLY took third place while Chris Jones & Louise Makin’s J/111 JOURNEYMAKER II took sixth.  Then, in IRC 2 Class, Simon Perry’s J/109 JIRAFFE took the silver, with Mike & Susie Yates’ J/109 JAGO securing the bronze, with David Richards’ J/109 JUMPING JELLYFISH taking fifth place.

    In the J/109 Class, it was Perry’s JIRAFFE in first, Richards’ JUMPING JELLYFISH in second, and the Yates’ JAGO in third.

    Ian Wilson & Marshall King's SOAK RACING started the J/70 UK Grand Slam Series in style and never looked back, winning the class by a significant margin.  Second was determined on a tie-breaker at 31 pts each.  Winning that countback was Doug Struth’s DSP, with third place taken by Paul Ward’s EAT SLEEP J REPEAT.  Rounding out the top five was Phillip Rees Bryn’s GBR 1290 in fourth and the Calascione/ Ripard duo on CALYPSO taking fifth place.

    Black & White Group Report
    In IRC 1 Class, the Jones/Makin duo on the J/111 JOURNEYMAKER II is currently sitting in fourth place.

    In IRC 2 Class, Charles Ivill’s J/112E DAVANTI TYRES has risen like a rocket into the top of the leaderboard and now sit in first place after eight races. Just one point back is Simon Perry’s J/109 JIRAFFE. Sitting in fifth place is Chris Burleigh’s J/109 JYBE TALKIN.

    Despite not having sailed races 3 & 4, David Greenhalgh’s J/92 J’RONIMO is now sitting in third place in IRC 3 class.

    With six races, the J/88 Class continues to see Gavin Howe’s TIGRIS topping the class with all bullets for 5 pts. Now that “toss races” are factored in, Dirk & Dianne Van Beek’s SABRIEL JR still hold on to 2nd place, while Richard Cooper’s JONGLEUR hangs on to third position.

    The J/109s have eight races counting. Simon Perry’s JIRAFFE continues to lead with 7 pts, winning their fifth race last weekend. Chris Burleigh’s JYBE TALKIN stays in second with 22 pts.  However, jumping up into third place is John Smart’s JUKEBOX with 39 pts.

    Continuing to lead the J/88 class is Gavin Howe’s TIGRIS with all 1sts in eight races, tossing out two 1sts.  Wow!  Second is Dirk & Dianne Van Beek’s SABRIEL JR. with 12 pts.  Then, third is Richard Cooper’s JONGLEUR with 83 pts.

    The J-Sprit class still sees Howe’s J/88 TIGRIS leading. SABRIEL JR continues in 2nd, but Adrian Johnson’s J/109 FLAWLESS J is now sitting in third place.

    The J/70s continue to see Paul Ward’s EAT SLEEP J REPEAT leading the class with just 15 pts.  Second is Philip Chandler’s BLACKJAX and third is Graham Clapp’s JEEPSTER.   Sailing photo credits- Andrew Adams/ CloseHauled Photography   Follow the Warsash Spring Series on Facebook here   For more HELLY HANSEN Warsash Spring Series sailing information
     

     
    Russian J/70 Sailing League Report
    (Sochi/ Tuapse/ Konakovo, Russia)- The Russian J/70 Sailing League has already started off their 2019 sailing season and over the past two weeks it is in full swing!  Over 45 teams from all over Russia have been sailing in the Supreme Division and the Premiere Division; on famous Black Sea resorts in Sochi and Tuapse. In addition, a Qualifying event was held at the Konakovo River Club, northwest of Moscow.

    Tuapse Supreme Division- Stage II
    Twenty-three teams entered the battle for the title of the Russian Sailing League Champion; Burevestnik Sailing Team (ex. Leviathan) (steering Vadim Yakhinson), ArtTube RUS1 (Valeria Kovalenko), Calipso (Maxim Taranov), Sailing Academy of the Yacht Club of St. Petersburg (Anna Basalkina), PIRogovo (Yuri Morozov), Sail Lord— ASIA (Vyacheslav Yermolenko), Sail Lord– EUROPE (Andrey Ryzhov), NAVIGATOR Trem (Alexandra Peterson), Rocknrolla Sailing Team (Irina Sorokina), X-Fit (Vladimir Silkin), RUS7 (Sergey Shevtsov), Region-23 (Evgeny Nikiforov), CSKA (Mikhail Poslamovsky), Black Sea (Andrey Malygin), Komatek (Vyacheslav Frolov), OSK (Edward Skornyakov), East-West (Andrey Zuev), ZID art Sailing team (Evgeny Neugodnikov), Parusnik74.ru (Edward Podshivalov), Winner Sailing Team (Karina Teljyants), Matryoshka (Natalia Kravets), Akhmat (Alexander Bozhko) and the guest team “AMP of the Black Sea” (Nikolai Egorov).

    Tuapse provided the sailors what could only be described as completely non-April weather and variable wind. A combination of rain, sun, clouds, and highly variable winds in both direction and velocity.

    “The strength of the wind was constantly changing: from complete calm to 10-12 knots,” said Chief Judge Nikolai Yushkov. “I can only imagine how hard it was for the racers. What was important was not so much knowledge as luck, a sense of wind, and much good fortune!”

    As a result, eleven races were sailed on the first race day. Fifteen teams had four starts, six teams had three races each and two teams had five each.

    After the first race day, the undisputed leader was the BLACK SEA Team skippered by Andrey Malygin with an impressive 1-1-1-4 record. They were followed by NAVIGATOR TREM helmed by Alexandra Peterson with a 2-4-1-2 tally. RUS7 Team led by Sergey Shevtsov was sitting in third place with a 5-2-2-1.  Having a rough time in the variable weather off Tuapse were the leaders after Stage I; Alexander Bozhko’s crew from the Chechen Republic on AKHMAT finished the day in 6th place, while Valeria Kovalenko’s crew from Pirogovo on ARTTUBE RUS1 sat in a very uncharacteristic 10th place.

    At the end of the regatta on Sunday, the PRO managed to run only ten more races.  As a result, it was Malygin’s BLACK SEA Team that managed to hold off a hard-charging AKHMAT Team skippered by Alexander Bozhko to take the top two spots on the podium.  Meanwhile, Petersen’s NAVIGATOR TREM Team lost a bit of their edge from the first day to drop into the bronze position.  Rounding out the top five were ZID ART Sailing Team (Evgeny Neugodnikov) in fourth and RUS7 (Sergey Shevtsov) dropping down the standings to fifth place after day one.

    Konakovo Qualifying Division- Stage I & II
    The Konakovo River Club northwest of Moscow will be hosting the first qualifying stage event for the Russian Sailing League’s “entry” division in their fleet of J/70s next weekend.

    These competitions are only a great opportunity to meet other sailing teams from around Russia, but also an opportunity to qualify for the next division higher in 2020- the Premiere Division.

    This year, two qualifying stages will be held in the fleet of J/70s at the Konakovo River Club. Nine teams will take part in each of the two qualifying stages, and the top four of each event will take part in the 2019 Russian Championship regatta.

    Recall that last year 24 teams took part in the Russian J/70 Sailing League Championship, which took place in Pirogovo. For 2019, the championship will take place in Sochi from October 25th to 27th, hosted by Sochi Grand Marina by the Burevestnik Group.

    Tuapse Premier Division- Stage II
    Last weekend, the second stage of the Premiere Division took place in Tuapse. Fourteen teams participated in the regatta from Moscow, St. Petersburg, Sochi, Kazan, Voronezh and Yekaterinburg.

    Over the three-day event, the organizers managed to hold twenty-one races. Unfortunately, a gentle wind prevented the fulfillment of the entire planned program. On the first day, the wind reached 10 knots.  However, for the next two days, the breezes barely pushed up to 5 kts! As a result, most of the starts- 11 - were raced on the first day of the regatta.

    Friday's victor was the SAIL & SEA Team skippered by Vasily Harabardina. The crew from St. Petersburg sailed very well, posting three 1sts, two 2nds, and a 4th. Ending the day tied for second place were Ekaterina Stolbneva's DOBRYNA Team with a 4-1-6-2-3-2 tally and PEC: SPORT YOUTH Team led by Dmitry Popkov with nearly identical scores of 2-3-6-3-1-3.

    On the second day, only five races were held. The leader of the first day, the SAIL & SEA Team, was unable to hold their position; two 5ths and one 3rd in three races drove the crew down to second place. Leaping into first place was Dmitry Popkov’s PEC: SPORT MOLODEZHKA Team after posting a 1-1-2 for the day. Then, moving into third place was Alexey Lesnikov’s B-TEAM (they were the winners of the first stage).

    On the third and final day on Sunday, the wind “officially” died. “In the morning, the wind reached 5 knots, so we managed to hold two races,” said Daniil Dejanov, the main judge of the regatta. “We caught every breath of wind, but unfortunately, we couldn't get more than four races on Sunday.”

    As a result, Popkov’s PEC: SPORT MOLODEZHKA Team failed to hold onto the top line after posting a 4-3-3 for the day, ultimately having to settle for the bronze medal in Tuapse. “For the second time in a row, we were winning after the second day,” said Mikhail Filatov, the helmsman of PEC: SPORT MOLODEZHKA. “First place was not far away! But, we made a few mistakes on the last day.”

    Second place went to the UGAR Crew team. Two victories on Saturday and one on Sunday enabled the crew of Ruslan Yakupov to climb the podium for their first time in the Premier Division!

    The winner was Vasily Kharabardin’s SAIL & SEA Team.  After leading the first day, then dropping off any podium position on the second day, it was a strong comeback for the team on the last day to take back the lead.

    “I liked the race in Tuapse,” said Kharabardin. “The weather was different, but although the wind was not very strong, the judges and organizers managed to hold a good regatta. The fight to get on the podium was sharp and highly competitive. We were very worried when on the second day we failed so badly! But, we were happy to be lucky on the last day.”

    Sochi Supreme Division- Stage I
    Sochi Grand Marina by the Burevestnik Group hosted the first event for the Supreme Division’s 2019 sailing season.  Over the three days, the fleet was challenged by a wide variety of weather and solid breezes.  Twenty-eight races were completed for the twenty-four top sailing teams in the Russian National J/70 Sailing League.

    In the end, it was the champion Chechen Republic skipper Alexander Bozhkov on ACHMAT that won the regatta in convincing fashion, garnering more than his fair share of 1sts and podium finishes.  Taking second was a colleague of his, Valeria Kovalenko’s ARTTUBE RUS1 Team from Pirogovo.  Bozhkov can be seen frequently crewing for Kovalenko when she sails the larger J/70 open events across Europe and around the world- a fast, smart combination those two are!  Third in the opening Sochi event was RUS7 skippered by Sergey Shevtsov. Rounding out the top five were BLACK SEA Team (Andrey Malygin) and NAVIGATOR TREM (Alexandra Peterson), fourth and fifth, respectively.  For more Russian J/70 Sailing League information
     

    J/Community
    What friends, alumni, and crew of J/Boats are doing worldwide
    -----------
    Enjoy this sailing video of a J/88 flying across Long Island Sound. The American Yacht Club was hosting the first weekend of its annual AYC Spring Series.  However, on a sunny day blowing 20-30 kts-plus from the West/ Northwest, and temps hovering in the high 40s/ lows 50s (water temp at 45 deg!), racing was canceled for the day.  Instead of heading home or to the bar, as most teams did, Bruno’s crew on WINGS “sent it” down the Sound; hoisting the A3 black spinnaker and pushing the boat up to 20.8 kts in a 28 kt gust!



    * Warrior Sailing had twenty-one U.S. military veterans sailing at Charleston Race Week; some on larger keelboats and almost half of them sailing on College of Charleston’s fleet of one-design J/22s.  

    Warrior Sailing takes graduates from basic level sail-training through certification, and directly supports “beyond camp experiences” for the veterans. One of the most impactful events of the year is Charleston Race Week.

    Twenty-one graduates from the sail-training program were selected from a pool of applications to attend the 5th consecutive year of participation in the event. The group traveled in style with new gear from Zhik, and the support is always felt from the sailing community at the largest keelboat regatta in the country.

    Eight Warrior Sailors, five coaches, and three College of Charleston collegiate sailors were onboard the J/22’s. A highly competitive inshore fleet of 9 boats took to the water each day with most of the Warrior’s flying spinnakers for the first time during the training session on Wednesday. The intention is always based on instruction and gaining valuable experience onboard, but earning some hardware is also a bonus.

    Warrior Sailing J/22’s took 1st (Sammy Hodges), 3rd (Corey Hall), and 4th (Jacob Raymond) in the J/22 one-design class.  Congratulations to everyone and a very special thanks to the coaches and leadership at College of Charleston for their time and effort to teach Warriors what it means to race inshore and compete in this large regatta.

    MAKE A DONATION AND CHANGE A LIFE

    A special “Thank You” to the Charleston Race Week Foundation for their support. Portions of each registration for Charleston Race Week goes to supporting worthy causes participating in the Charleston area.  Warrior Sailing was selected to receive a grant to support making this an expense-free experience for the participants.  “Thank You” to Randy Draftz and the CRW Foundation for your continued support!

    We are so grateful for everyone who turned up to party with a purpose at the “Container Bar” during Charleston Race Week. Thanks to a great turnout, Warrior Sailing raised over $4,600 to support veterans participation in future training camps and events.

    From the bottom of our hearts, thank you to all sailors for your generous support. As a donor to our organization, you’re a part of what makes Warrior Sailing so special; you’re a part of our community. YOU make everything we do possible.
    Add to Flipboard Magazine.

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  • J/Newsletter- April 24th, 2019 J/Sailing News

    The Sun Never Sets on J's Sailing Worldwide

    A lot of sailing activity was taking place this past week in Europe. For starters, the largest annual offshore keelboat regatta in France kicked off the summer sailing season in La Trinite sur Mer, France- the famous, fabulous, huge, SPI OUEST France Regatta. The regatta is a magnet for everyone in the French sailing community, from one-design keelboats to the largest offshore IRC handicap racers. As usual, the J/80s had the biggest fleet, with J/70s growing quickly, and the French offshore establishment witnessed the successful debut of the evolutionary, fast, short-handed speedster- the new J/99. Off to the north, the Dutch sailors also enjoyed their huge season-opening event; the Van Uden Recco Regatta sailed off Stellendam, The Netherlands.

    Then, down in the Caribbean, the penultimate event of their winter circuit was the Les Voiles de St Barths sailed out of Gustavia Harbour. A duel of J/122s led to rather amazing results overall.
     

    Newport to Ensenada Race Preview
    (Newport Beach, CA)- Southern California offshore sailing teams are looking forward to their second major event of the season.  After the famous (and light) Cabo San Lucas race, the fleet is expecting “fast forward” downwind sleigh rides in this year’s Newport to Ensenada Race- one of the world’s largest international yacht races, with a legendary 125nm course that starts off the piers at Newport Beach, CA and heads south down the California coastline to a finish inside Toto Santos Bay off the lovely Hotel Coral & Marina in Ensenada.

    Starting on April 26th, the fleet of 180+ boats will look forward to their 72nd annual edition of the race.  Answering that seductive call to the sea- the “song of the sirens”- are nearly a dozen J/crews from the Southern California region.

    Rudolph Hasl’s crew have “up-scaled” their ride for his race; leaping from their J/120 HASL FREE to the J/145 PALAEMON in the PHF ULDB A Class.  Sailing in the PHRF ULDB B Class will be Scott Grealish’s J/121 BLUEFLASH and Viggo Torbensen’s J/125 TIMESHAVER; that will be an interesting duel to watch!  Then, in PHRF ULDB C Class, Seth Hall’s J/124 MARISOL will be up against Doug & Jack Jorgensen’s J/111 PICOSA. Finally, in PHRF ULDB D Class, Brian Kerr’s J/92 DOUBLE DOWN will do battle with two J/105s (Juan Lois’ ROCINANTE and Dan Murphy’s CUCHULAINN).

    The PHRF A fleet will see two J/120s dueling for class honors; Terri Manok’s POLE DANCER and Jack Rose’s PRIVATEER II.  For more Newport to Ensenada Race sailing information
     

     
    American YC Spring Series Preview
    (Rye, NY)- Spring sailing in the northeast of America is always a fickle thing; just ask those Solent sailors in the U.K. that are on the receiving end of the goofy weather patterns experienced over North America that happen to make their way across the North Atlantic in due course and slam into Scotland, Ireland, and the rest of the United Kingdom.

    Remarkably, the forecast for the first of two weekend’s of sailing in American Yacht Club’s annual Spring Series Regatta looks reasonably good for two solid days of sailing.

    There are a total of seventy-five entries overall in the event in One-Design and PHRF fleets. Six boats are racing IRC (obviously, not popular in the USA). Eighteen boats are racing PHRF; not exactly a ringing endorsement of YRA Long Island Sound PHRF is it?

    What is remarkable, is that fifty-six participants in the AYC Spring Series are J/Crews- 75% of the fleet are racing one-design! Those classes include One-Design classes for J/70s, J/80s, J/88s, J/105s, J/109s, and J/44s.

    Starting with the “big boat” J/44 One-Design Class, we find New York Yacht Club Commodore Bill Ketcham racing MAXINE with his family crew.  They are hoping to lead some old familiar names, as well as new ones, in what could be called the “Gold Digger Division” (in honor of the late Jim Bishop whom pioneered the development of the J/44 class). Chasing Bill will be none other than Len Sitar’s VAMP, Don & Dick Rave’s RESOLUTE, and class newcomers like Bill Mooney’s KATANA, June & Amanda Kendrick’s PALANTIR 5, and Tom Blackwell’s BREAKAWAY.

    The ten-boat J/109 class will see their usual suspects of class leaders on a national level participating in their first major regatta of the season. The real question will be “who’s showing up on first base” with a well-oiled machine? Likely, no one.  However, all will be focused on fine-tuning their teamwork and boatspeed for their J/109 North Americans later in the year. Notable leading teams should include Carl Olsson’s MORNING GLORY, Jon Rechtshaffer’s EMOTICON, John Greifzu’s GROWTH SPURT, David Rosow’s LOKI, and Bob Schwartz’s NORDLYS. OK, well that is half the fleet! Well, that is often the case in the J/109 class; anyone can win given that magic combination of starts, speed, and crew work!

    As the largest class in the regatta, the fourteen J/105s are certain to see great competition as the event will mark the first regatta on the road to the J/105 North American Championship to be held by Eastern Yacht Club in Marblehead, MA this coming September 2019. Watch for an eclectic selection of crews to be amongst the leaderboard; such as Paul Beaudin’s LOULOU, John Koten’s GRAY MATTER, Jeremy Henderson & Harald Edegran’s CONUNDRUM, the kids on the YOUNG AMERICAN, and Max Kalehoff’s LAURA BEA.

    The seven-boat J/88 class will be HOT off the trails of the recent Charleston Race Week that took place two weeks ago in Charleston, SC.  There, Mike Bruno’s team on WINGS won a very closely fought battle over Justin Scagnelli’s ALBONDIGAS, with Iris Vogel’s DEVIATION just off the pace in fourth.  Watch for the same trio to have another dust-up over the next two weekends on Long Island Sound.

    The octet of J/70s will be enjoying fun, fast racing on their near-shore race course. Familiar names that will factor into the leaderboard will be Marshall Saffer’s LET IT RIP, Carrie & Ed Austin’s CHINOOK, Dan Goldberg’s BAZINGA, Alex Meleney’s TRUCKIN, and the White Rhino Racing team on J-RHINO!

    A half-dozen J/80s will be participating with various crews from the Hudson River Community Sailing program. The lone private boat will be Jason Viseltear’s UPSETTER from Huguenot YC.

    In the world of PHRF handicap racing, there are three divisions.  In PHRF A Class, the Kings Point US Merchant Marine Academy is sailing the J/111 BLACK DIAMOND; Scott Devine is skippering the J/112E REVIVER, and Ron Richman will be helming the J/133 ANTIDOTE. Then, in the PHRF Cruising division, Charles Taus is sailing his J/33 SIRIUS. And, in the PHRF Plus-ONE Division is Steven Levy’s J/121 EAGLE from Indian Harbor Yacht Club.  For more American YC Spring Series sailing information
     

    Antigua Sailing Week Preview
    (English Harbour, Antigua)- More than 100 boats are registered from 30 countries worldwide and crews from many more will be taking part in a nine-day festival of racing and shoreside events that is Antigua Sailing Week, the Caribbean’s longest running regatta.

    Fifty-four yachts will be racing in the CSA Racing Classes and winning skippers will be competing for the famous Lord Nelson Trophy.

    The CSA racing fleet has a huge variety of professional and Corinthian sailors, young and old. Of those, six are J/Crews from across the constellation of experience. Those teams include Ben Jelic’s J/120 JAGUAR from St Maarten; Pamala Baldwin’s J/122 LIQUID from Antigua’s Jolly Harbour (the recent winner of her class at Voiles de St Barths); a Peruvian crew on the J/122 INKA TEAM/ EL OCASO skippered by Diego Aguirre from Lima, Peru; Roger Gatewood’s J/145 KATARA from Davis Island YC in Tampa, FL; Tanner Jones’ J/30 BLUE PETER/ CARIBBEAN ALLIANCE INSURANCE from Jolly Harbour, Antigua; and Jonty & Vicky Layfield’s J/11S SLEEPER from St Phillips Bay, Antigua.

    Racing kicks off with the stand-alone Peters & May Round Antigua Race, followed by six days of Antigua Sailing Week. While racing always comes first at Antigua Sailing Week, the shoreside fun is very much part of the regatta.

    Competitors gather after racing for the daily prize giving each day, with featured rock & roll and reggae artists each evening. The Final Awards Ceremony & Party is always a memorable occasion and the fun doesn’t stop there, with Dockyard Days and the Dickenson Bay Beach Bash closing the regatta.  For more Antigua Sailing Week sailing information
     

     
    Inviting J/Sailors to Marblehead-Halifax Race
    (Marblehead, MA)- Plans are moving ahead, and registrations are already building for the 38th biennial Marblehead to Halifax Ocean Race on Sunday July 7. The 363.0nm international ocean race will leave Marblehead on July 7 headed for Halifax, Nova Scotia.

    “With sixty boats signed up, we have a strong early enrollment and expect to have 80 boats on the starting line," said Vice Commodore David Bows, of the Boston Yacht Club, who is Co-Chairman of the event.

    To date fourteen J/Boats (already 25% of the fleet) have signed up to compete and more are expected. “We have always had a strong showing from the J/Boat fleet,” says Tom Mager, Rear Commodore of Boston YC. Mager has entered his J/122 GIGI in this year’s race. It will be his first Halifax Race.

    First sailed in 1905, the Marblehead to Halifax Race is the premier ocean race in the northeast. It is co-sponsored by the Boston Yacht Club and the Royal Nova Scotia Yacht Squadron. Sailors from the United States and Canada will converge on Marblehead over the Fourth of July for a round of social events highlighting the summer racing season.

    Race Directors Anne Coulombe and Richard Hinterhoeller plan to configure the starting line so that spectators can view the start of the race from such vantage points as Castle Rock and Crocker Park.  “It worked well in recent years, so we’re hoping the weather will cooperate and we can do it again this year”, they said.  For more Marblehead to Halifax Ocean Race sailing information
     

     
    Exciting J/24 European Champs In The Making!
    (Patra, Greece)- There are almost fifteen days left before the first official race of the J/24 Class European Championship, organized by the Sailing Club of Patra, in collaboration with the Hellenic and International J/24 Class and the Hellenic Sailing Federation.

    Some 175 sailors and thirty-five crews from all around Europe have already arrived or are expected to arrive in the city of Patra, the third largest city of Greece. Patra is well known for its annual carnival and is surrounded by some of the most magnificent, well-known archaeological sites of Greece.

    Preparations are well on the way, with official races commencing on May 7th. Prior to that, measurements, registration and a practice race will be held from the 4th to the 6th of May 2019. All boats will moor at the pier of Agios Nikolaos in the old northern harbor of the city.  Racing will be taking place just outside of the harbor, providing spectators with the possibility to observe a magnificent view of all J/24’s racing around the course. Besides the sailing, the Sailing Club of Patra has planned an exciting program of social events for all the participants.

    Following a very successful J/24 World Championship in Italy with ninety participants, the city of Patra is ready to host another exciting event for the world’s largest keelboat class. The European J/24 Championship is open to anyone; and last minute registrations are welcome! We have a few more J/24 charter boats available for these last minute crews who would like to participate. Follow the J/24 European Championship on Facebook here  For more J/24 European Championship sailing information
     

    Regatta & Show Schedules:

    Mar 17- Apr 28- Warsash Spring Series- Warsash, England
    Apr 26-28- Newport to Ensenada Race- Newport Beach, CA
    Apr 27-28- American YC Spring Series- Rye, NY
    Apr 28- May 3- Antigua Sailing Week- English Harbour, Antigua
    May 3-5- Annapolis NOOD Regatta- Annapolis, MD
    May 3-5- Yachting Cup Regatta- San Diego, CA
    May 4-10- J/24 European Championship- Patras, Greece
    May 4- RORC Cervantes Cup Race- Cowes, England
    May 9-12- SAILING Champions League- Palma Mallorca, Spain
    May 10-12- Grand Prix de St Cast- St Cast, France
    May 10-12- RORC Vice Admiral’s Cup- Cowes, England

    For additional J/Regatta and Event dates in your region, please refer to the on-line J/Sailing Calendar.

     
    J/99s Debut @ SPI Ouest France Regatta
    (La Trinite sur Mer, France)- Last weekend, the Societe Nautique de La Trinite sur Mer hosted their annual SPI Ouest France Regatta.  The event was simply huge and, as anticipated prior to the regatta, the competition was fierce in certain classes in what was predominantly a very light air regatta- far, far lighter than what has been the historical average for this Easter Weekend regatta.

    The 2019 edition had 398 keelboats on the water, of which 98 were a veritable navy of J’s (25% of the total fleet) that included J/70s, J/80s, J/92s, J/97s, J/99s, J/105s, J/109, J/111, J/120 and J/122E.

    The most exciting news for J/sailors was watching the debut of the quartet of new J/99s racing in their first major event since launching the first boat early March in the United Kingdom.  In short, despite having virtually zero time to tune-up, debug, fine-tune rig settings, adjust sails, and train the crew, the J/99s in both the IRC B Class and the IRC Doublehanded class closed the regatta on the final day with podium finishes or outright dominant victories!

    We received a report and commentary from Fred Bouvier fresh after the awards ceremony on Monday:

    “We launched J-LANCE 14 just two weeks before SPI Ouest and Olivier Grassi’s boat was launched just 48 hours before the regatta and managed to sail just four hours prior to the first day of racing!

    There were four J/99s participating in the regatta, three were in IRC B class and one in the IRC Double class. Two boats had double rudders and the other two had single rudders.  All boats had symmetric spinnakers, ‘short’ bowsprits with long spinnaker poles, and flat keels for optimized IRC rating trim. The three boats in IRC B class had carbon rigs, only the IRC Doublehanded class boat had the standard aluminum mast.

    It was very difficult sailing for the regatta. It was very light winds all four days- ranging from 4.0 to 8.0 kts. Plus, we were fighting moon tides that were producing very strong currents.

    Perhaps the most important lessons learned were that each boat did better race after race; everyone was learning how to tune the rig, then set the sails better, and the crew work and racing tactics/ strategies improved, too.

    What we discovered is that the J/99 is very fast downwind, as fast or faster, than most 11 to 12 meter boats in class (36 to 40 footers). Perhaps the most enlightening aspect of the boat is that it is very stiff; we were very fast upwind.

    Our biggest issue in the windward-leeward races was that we were stuck in a 26-boat class that had a good half-dozen very well sailed 36 to 41 footers; so keeping clear from their bad winds was of paramount importance.

    In the third coastal race around buoys and islands, everything that could go wrong, did go wrong for us on J-LANCE 14!  We had a bad start, bad tuning, bad tactics, and sailed into several holes. It was definitely a ‘big boat’ race, but our mistakes killed us.

    However, by the last race, we got it all together and finished right on the transom of the J/122E MUSIX that got on the podium with the bronze medal! We were quite happy with that outcome! Similarly, Olivier Grassi in the IRC Doublehanded Class not only beat most of the 52-boat class overall on elapsed time, beating many bigger boats, but won by a lot on handicap time! A great way to finish the regatta for both boats!

    When we discussed how the boat sailed with the various skippers, it was pretty clear that for the longer reaching legs, the twin rudders were better, it had lighter feel on the helm offshore. However, if sailing W/L courses most of the time, it appeared the single rudder may be better for both VMG upwind, but more importantly, for VMG downwind.

    We are also pleased to report that of all the new 28 to 32 footers introduced at SPI Ouest, the J/99 was viewed as the most comfortable and versatile as a weekend family cruiser, too! All other competitive boats (like the JPK 1010, 1030, 1080, Sunfast 3200, 3300, 3600) were seen as simply race boats only, with no room or comforts down below.

    With a little more time to fine-tune the rigging settings, the sail trim, and sail selection choices, we believe we will have a good showing at an overnight double-handed event in La Rochelle in two weeks.”

    In the end, it was Phillipp Baetz’s J/122E MUSIX from the host club SN Trinite sur Mer that took the bronze in IRC B class with a 5-12-3-6-7 record for 21 pts net.  Just one point back was Didier LeMoal’s J/99 J-LANCE 14 with a 8-7-18-4-3 tally for 22 pts net. Notably, in the last race, the two J/99s (Andrew Algeo’s Irish team on JUGGERKNOT 2 and the French J-LANCE 14) finished 2nd and 3rd, respectively, on handicap time and also beat all but one of the 35 to 40 footers in the entire class boat-for-boat! And, that included crushing two very famous French offshore teams; the JPK 1080 RAGING BEE and the JPK 1010 FOGGY DEW (the overall RORC Fastnet Race winners)!

    The 50-boat IRC Doublehanded division was considered to have some of the fiercest offshore competition in the regatta, with many French solo/double stars sprinkled amongst the various boats; many of which are full-time professional sailors.  Up against such a formidable contingent of French superstars, Olivier Grassi’s J/99 GRASSI BATEAUX started off slowly but steadily improved every race, posting a 11-5-5-1 scoreline to secure the bronze, just 2 pts from the silver and 3 pts from the gold!  An amazing performance for a boat that was just “float-tested” less than 48 hours before their first start!

    In their fourth and final race, GRASSI BATEAUX felt they were finally getting a good feel for their boat. After a nearly three hour race, they were third boat across the line on elapsed time, just 1 min 30 sec behind a 34 footer and ahead of all the 36 to 40 footers; an astonishing achievement in a brand new boat (literally!), all things considered in such a hot, competitive fleet. The rest of the fleet was a who’s who of the French offshore shorthanded establishment; all sailing in these boats- Sunfast 3600 (9), Sunfast 3200 (9), Sunfast 40 (1), JPK 1080 (6), JPK 1010 (8), and A35 (4).

    Racing in the thirteen-boat IRC A class was Patrice Vidon’s J/111 J4F from Societe Nautique Baie St Malo. In the end, their 8-6-7-9-4 tally for 25 pts net was good enough for 6th overall, just 7 pts from a podium finish.

    In the twenty-five-boat IRC C class, the two J/92s sailed well.  Matthieu Visbecq’s NAVARCHSOFT took sixth place while Thierry Bidon’s DR JEKYLL from CN Lorient placed eighth.

    The French version of the American PHRF class is called the Osiris Habitable handicap rule. In the OSH 2 Class, Samuel Blevin’s J/109 JOKE sailed a very nice regatta and their crew hopped onto the podium in the bronze position.


    The seventeen-boat J/70 class saw very competitive racing for most of the top ten, except the winner!  Walking off with the convincing class win was Russian Alexei Semenov’s NEW TERRITORIES team (including Spanish Olympic Medallist Hugo Rocha as trim/ tactics); they essentially crushed the fleet with five 1sts and three 2nds in ten races to win by a twenty-point margin! Taking the silver was Frenchman Laurent Sambron racing HEMO-CAMUS with a 37 pts net total.  Third was Damian Michelier’s SAGE ENGINEERING SAILING TEAM with 42 pts net.  Rounding out the top five were Francois Lenart’s MECENAT CHIRURGIE CARDIAQUE in 4th an Phillippe Guigne’s VIRTUAL REGATTA 70 in 5th position.

    With sixty-six boats, the J/80 class was, again, by far the largest class at SPI Ouest France for at least ten years in a row, maybe more. The regatta produced a few surprise results due to the very light air conditions.  Winning was Frenchman Pierre Laouenan on COURRIER ECOLE NAVALE, producing an astonishing tally of 15-1-3-2-1-1 for 8 pts net to win by a large margin.  Taking second was another surprise fleet leader, the Spanish crew of Almandoz Iker sailing GRUPO GARATU with a 1-4-4-4-2-19 record for 15 pts net. Third was a familiar face on the podium, Frenchman Sylvain Pellisier’s INTUITIVE SAILS with a 4-35-2-1-8-11 scoreline for 26 pts. net. Rounding out the top five in this tough class was Luc Nadal’s GAN’JA in 4th and Corentin Kieffer’s GRAND OUEST ETIQUETTES in 5th place.

    Here is an interview with the winner- Pierre Laouenan.

    SPI: Pierre, what memory will you keep from this 41st Spi Ouest-France?

    PL: Obviously a very good memory, since we win! Overall, we showed a good level, we were fairly regular. It was a recovery for this crew; it was two years since we had not done a J/80. We also discovered the Courrier École Navale boat. Our goal is the world championship, this year in Bilbao, in July. It was therefore important for us to make a good recovery, to take the boat in hand.

    SPI: You had a complicated departure ...

    PL: Yes, we start with our worst race, taking the fifteenth place. Then, we go on the podiums: three races being first, another being second and finally a third place. It is a real satisfaction, there was also a strong competition.

    SPI: You are not at your first attempt on the Spi Ouest-France?

    PL: No, I do not count the number of Spi Ouest-France I made, but it is my third victory in J/80, and the fourth SPI Ouest I win in all. It is always a nice race, especially when you run with nice conditions like that, with sun and a little wind.

    SPI: The wind was still a little slow?

    PL: Over the last two days it was very soft it is true, but we still managed to sail, the committee was doing well and we could all run a few runs even if it was not always easy. There were also strong currents, and therefore an important part of strategy in navigation. We managed not to make too many mistakes, and we are really satisfied with this edition. Sailing photo credits- Jean-Marie Liot  For more SPI Ouest France sailing information
     

     
    J/122 LIQUID Crushes LVSB X Edition
    (Gustavia Harbor, St Barths)- Pamala Baldwin, owner of the J/122 LIQUID from Antigua, frequently races the Caribbean circuit, but until this regatta, she and her young Skipper Jules White hadn't quite cracked the top of the podium.

    She added Mike Giles as tactician and coach to complement the young talented team, and according to Baldwin, “it was the final piece we needed to complete the winning puzzle. My heart is filled with joy!”

    LIQUID’s skipper, Julian White, age 25 of Lymington, England is also the racing yacht's manager and according to Baldwin, "Jules is someone the racing world needs to keep an eye on...he maneuvered LIQUID through this entire season. We competed in every Caribbean Regatta, including the RORC Caribbean 600, with consistent podium results."

    Giles has raced almost every Les Voiles in the Maxi class, and really enjoyed his time in the smaller CSA 4 fleet. ”In this fleet there are no ‘gimmies’, it's an incredibly competitive class with close racing," the native South African said. "The racing is just as tough, if not harder, than when I'm sailing in the Maxis."

    Baldwin remarked, “my entire crew of ten are under age 30, competing against seasoned pro’s. You have no idea of my pride, knowing LIQUID is providing a platform for their future racing careers! Challenging and exhausting, but to sweep the entire CSA classes during Les Voiles 10th prestigious regatta with bullet after bullet is as exhilarating, as it is rewarding! It doesn't get better than this!”

    Enjoying the conditions equally as well was Chris Body’s J/122 EL OCASO, posting a 3-5-3-2-4-2 for 19 pts to take the bronze, just missing a podium 1-2 sweep of the CSA 4 Class by the J/122s.

    The tenth edition of the Voiles de Saint Barth provided the fleet of fifty-five offshore racing thoroughbreds a remarkable week of racing. “Sailing in St. Barth’s is never easy,” said Luc Poupon, Race Organizer. “There is much to navigate around with the rocks and it’s not as simple as it seems to negotiate. Clearly, knowing the nuances of sailing around St. Barth helps, and every day the competitors had to deal with the multiple wind shifts.”  For more Les Voiles de Saint Barth sailing information
     

    J/Crews Dominate Battles @ Van Uden Ecco Regatta
    (Stellendam, Netherlands)- The first major offshore regatta of the Dutch offshore sailing season took place this past weekend off Stellendam, The Netherlands on the North Sea. In general, J/Teams did quite well across the board in the challenging, somewhat light to medium sailing conditions (the same massive High pressure system that caused the cancellation of the RORC’s Easter Regatta off Cowes, England).

    The first of the season-long Dutch Doublehanded Series started with this event. Not surprisingly, the top Dutch crew of John van der Starre and Robin Verhoef started off the 2019 season in first place on their J/122E AJETO.  In fact, J/Teams nearly dominated the top five. Taking third was Chris Revelman & Pascal Bakker’s J/122 JUNIQUE, followed by Michel Hof’s J/122 AMBITION in fourth place and Ad Lagendijk’s J/109 IMAJINE in 5th place.

    In the ORC 1 Class, it was Paul van Driel’s J/111 SWEENY that posted a 5-3-3-1-1 to take the silver with 8 pts, just one point shy of first overall!

    In the ORC 2 Class, the J/109s occupied half of the top seven. Taking fourth was Rutger Krijger’s JACK RABBIT, followed by Alain Bornet’s JAI ALAI in 5th, and Arjen van Leeuwen’s JOULE in seventh position.

    In the one-design world, the J/70 class has grown considerably in the Netherlands. This year’s regatta saw the fleet double in size from last year. Winning this year’s event was Wouter Kollmann’s PLA J with a 1-2-3-1-1-1 for 6 pts net.  Grabbing the silver was John den Engelsman’s MR HENRI with a 3-5-1-2-3-3 for 12 pts net.  Then, Jan Wanders’ KIND OF MAGIC took the bronze with a 2-3-2-6-2-5 for 14 pts net.

    The J/22 class was won by the French crew on JAZZY, led by Reiner Brockerhoff; it was a “nip & tuck” fierce fight all weekend with Dirk Jan Ver Doorn’s Netherlands team on JUT EN JUL. The JAZZY team took it all in the last race, ending up with a 1-2-1-5-4-1 for 9 pts net. Losing that proposition was JUT EN JUL with a 2-1-2-1-9-4 for 10 pts net. Rounding out the top three was Melina Dinter’s JAG’D from Germany with a 7-3-4-2-1-3 for 13 pts net. For more Van Uden Reco Regatta sailing information
     

    J/Community
    What friends, alumni, and crew of J/Boats are doing worldwide
    -----------
    Juan Reid from J/Boats Chile provided this report regarding a recent J/80 clinic on Lago Llanquihue (a lake just north of Puerto Montt,  about 900 miles south of the capital of Santiago):

    “Sixteen people from Frutillar and Puerto Varas meet at Cofradía Náutica de Frutillar on March 30th for a J/80 clinic that was led by Stu Johnstone from J/Boats in Newport.

    The J/80 class has four active boats on Lago Llanquihue. It is a very enthusiastic fleet that participates in many regattas; such as the non-stop around Lago Llanquihue race (e.g. “Vuelta al Lago”) and also the Semana de La Vela races from 19 to 26th of January.

    We met at 10:00 AM for a theoretical tuning discussion and then the group split onto the two J/80’s that were available- "Cumberland Yacht Charter" and "Domingo Siete".

    The weather could not have been more spectacular and beautiful. It was a sunny day, light winds of 5 to 8 kts from the south. We had great views of the three famous volcanos across the lake (Osorno, Puntiagudo and Calbuco). It was simply perfect scenery for our sailing clinic.

    We ran several windward-leeward legs for the two teams. Stu J and I were on a RIB giving instructions to the two teams regards sail trim, boat trim, and boat-handling maneuvers.

    After three hours of sailing, the sailors headed back to the yacht club to enjoy lunch (awesome BBQ and local wines) and a good conversation about the lessons on the water.

    The clinic was great input for the J/80 class on Lago Llanquihue. They need as much knowledge as possible!”
    Add to Flipboard Magazine.

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  • J/Newsletter- April 17th, 2019 J/Sailing News

    The Sun Never Sets on J's Sailing Worldwide

    One of the most amazing events that took place this past week was World Sailing’s NATIONS CUP Regatta on San Francisco Bay for nearly a week of competition. Sailed on their matched fleet of J/22 one-design sailboats, the St Francis Yacht Club held a five-day regatta that included both “Open” and “Women” divisions for world-class match-racing. Notably, the French swept the event, despite prognostications to the contrary (a bright spot for their nation, despite the tragic fire at the Notre Dame Cathedral). Going from the “left coast” to the “right coast”, the largest sailing regatta in America took place in Charleston, South Carolina. That event- the SPERRY Charleston Race Week- has grown considerably over time and, in its latest incarnation, had nearly 50% J/Teams participation (about 75% of all sailors).

    Over in the United Kingdom, the Warsash Spring Series held their fifth weekend of sailing activity.  This past weekend marked the start of their Black Championship Regatta, a special “within a series” regatta that takes place over two weekends.  The competition continued to be ferocious, especially for the large fleet of J/70s that are beginning their ramp-up/ tune-up for the 2019 J/70 World Championship in Torquay, England.

    Meanwhile, down in the Caribbean, the Les Voiles de St Barths Regatta continues to progress this week. They have completed three days of racing, starting on Monday. On Thursday, the fleet was relaxing and enjoying a sybaritic day on the infamous Nikki Beach party.

    In the J/Community, there are several entertaining profiles and insights on “veteran” sailors as well as “youth” sailors. For example, one J/35 sailor has sailed all 24 Charleston Race Weeks. Then, a group of youth sailors on a J/70 described their experience sailing in Charleston Race Week. Similarly, we have a parent/ family sailing video perspective on kids sailing on their J/34 IOR KNEE DEEP off Cleveland, OH on Lake Erie.  Finally, the J/121 EAGLE had an early spring tuning session with triple-slotting as part of their training program- fascinating photos!
     

     
    SPI Ouest France Regatta Preview
    (La Trinite sur Mer, France)- If it’s Easter Bank Holiday, it must be time for the largest regatta in France to usher in the new sailing season! Yes, it is that time again, from April 18th to 22nd, the Societe Nautique de La Trinite sur Mer hosts their annual SPI Ouest France Regatta.

    The event is simply huge and is also an important gathering place for all sailors, professionals, and marine industry people.  The 2019 edition will have 398 keelboats on the water, of which 98 are a veritable navy of J’s (25% of the total fleet) that include J/70s, J/80s, J/92s, J/97s, J/99s, J/105s, J/109, J/111, J/120 and J/122E.

    The leading contenders in the IRC Divisions will include the trio of the brand new J/99’s making their first major regatta debut. The stakes could not get any higher than the largest regatta in France run each year! Leading that charge in the IRC B fleet may be Didier LeMoal’s latest J-LANCE 14 from Societe Regate Rochelaises. Then, Olivier Grassi’s J/99 GRASSI BATEAUX is sailing in the IRC Double class against a formidable contingent of top French offshore doublehanded sailing teams.

    Racing in the IRC A class will be P. Vidon’s J/111 J4F from Societe Nautique Baie St Malo.  Joining the J/99s in IRC B are H. Mehu’s J/109 JACKPOT, P. Girardin’s J/120 HEY JUDE, and P. Baetz’s J/122E MUSIX; all three teams are from the host club- SN Trinite sur Mer. In IRC C class will be two J/92s- M. Visbecq’s NAVARCHSOFT and T. Bidon’s DR JEKYLL from CN Lorient.

    The French version of the American PHRF class is called the Osiris Habitable handicap rule.  There are nine J/Teams participating in OSH 1 Division, including four J/105s, S. Blevin’s J/109 JOKE, two J/97s (O. Kayser’s NUAGE II and P. Mabo’s HALIOTIS), and a lone J/24 (A. Garcia’s JERONIMO).

    Yet again, the largest class in the biggest regatta in France happens to be the sixty-four boat J/80 class, with representatives from Belgium, Spain, Great Britain and Ireland. The top French teams include Simon Moriceau’s ARMEN HABITAT, Sylvain Pellisier’s INTUITIVE SAILS, Luc Nadal’s GANJA, Ludovic Gilet’s NUMERO J, and Laurent Verdier’s HIP HOP. The top visiting teams include Kevin Sproul’s ULTIMATE SAILS/ J.A.T. from Great Britain and J. O’Dowd’s JABS from Ireland.

    The seventeen-boat J/70 class continues to grow its participation in the SPI Ouest Regatta, and the competition is getting stronger as well, with representatives from three nations- France, Russia, and the USA.  The top French crews are Luc Sambron’s HEMON CAMUS, Herve Leduc’s PIERRE OCEANE/ JIBESET.  The top visitors include the American B. Vibert on APOLLO J and the Russian/ Spanish team on NEW TERRITORIES, led by Alex Semenov from Moscow with Olympic Medallist Hugo Rocha as trim/ tactics.  For more SPI Ouest France sailing information
     

     
    RORC Easter Challenge Preview
    (Cowes, England)- You can pay for new sails. You can pay for keel fairing and a good bottom job. You can pay a specialist to try to optimize your IRC rating. Any of the above will help you to get around the race track faster in a more successful manner.

    However, none if them address the real issue- that boat speed gains, ultimately translating into performance on the race course- can come just as readily if you spend time not money on yourself. You can change the set-up and trim of your boat, and spend time on the water testing that while practicing to improve your crew’s skill-sets, boat handling and techniques.

    The fast track way to do this is by employing a coach– the reason why Olympic sailors and America’s Cup teams have them full time. However, competitors at the RORC Easter Challenge (Friday 19th-Sunday 21st April)- be they RORC members or no – will receive coaching for FREE from some of the top names in British sailing.

    This coaching is provided by the Royal Ocean Racing Club to improve general sailing skills, and thus, the tightness of the racing, both in its own fleets and more broadly. Many crews use the event effectively to kick start their new season, to make both themselves and their boat race-ready after the winter break.

    While the coaching may be FREE, it comes from top sailors, notably ‘the guru’ Jim Saltonstall, whose influence helped drive many of the top names in British yacht racing, like Ben Ainslie, Iain Percy and Chris Draper, on their way to their present success. Another integral part of the coaching effort is Eddie Warden Owen. He may spend more time in a suit these days as the RORC CEO, but he has been one of the UK’s top sailors and also has a long CV coaching, including America’s Cup teams such as Team New Zealand and Desafio Espanol. They are assisted by professional keelboat coach Mason King.

    Once again, North Sails is a partner of the RORC Easter Challenge and various sailmakers from the Gosport loft will be both helping with the on-the-water coaching, while others will be sailing on key boats in the fleet.

    “For RORC Easter Challenge competitors, the coaching is optional,” says RORC Racing Manager Chris Stone. “You can just pitch up and treat it as a normal yacht race. Or, you can ask the coaches to come over and look at something when you’re out on the water. But better still, before the event let us know if there is anything specific you’d like the coaches to look at.” This is could be seeing how well a change in trim is working or a new technique for maneuvers, or checking new sails.

    For those unfamiliar with the event, the coaching comes in two significant parts. On the water, the event is unique in having RRS 41 “Outside Help” relaxed. This permits coaches to climb onboard to demonstrate something and/or the crew can step off on to a coaching RIB to check trim mid-race! A very valuable process for any sailing team!

    Post-racing on the Friday and Saturday nights at the RORC’s Cowes Clubhouse, the coaching team will examine lessons learned during the day, backed up with video from the race course. New for 2019 is that due to the breadth of the fleet and the introduction of a doublehanded class, the debrief session for the whole group will be followed by sessions for smaller groups, with, for example, Nikki Curwen (top woman J/105 sailor) leading the one for Doublehanders.

    A repeat visitor is the J/109 MOJO RISIN’, campaigned by Rob Cotterill with a crew, largely from London Business School Sailing Club. The boat is heavily campaigned and she managed to finish 16th among almost 400 boats in last year’s RORC Season’s Points Championship.

    “It is a great regatta,” says Cotterill of the RORC Easter Challenge. “We treat it like a mini Cowes Week and spend a lot of time on the debriefs, which are really useful. We’ll also be trying to get attention from the coaching boats. Last year they were able to compare how we were sailing against another J/109 JUBILEE, looking at the trim differences, etc; that was really useful. We are all amateur sailors and this helps us to learn fast. The more help we can get, the better.”

    As usual the RORC Easter Challenge will conclude with a prize-giving mid-afternoon on Easter Sunday, where chocolate eggs in extreme quantities will be given out among the prizes!  For more RORC Easter Challenge sailing information
     

    J/24 Lady Liberty Cup Announcement
    (New York, NY)- The Manhattan Yacht Club is proud to host the 20th edition of the Lady Liberty Cup to be sailed June 8th and 9th in New York Harbor. Sponsored by the New York Harbor Sailing Foundation, the purpose of the event is to support and promote amateur women’s sailing in the United States by bringing together top women sailors. The regatta will be raced on identical J/24 sailboats provided by Manhattan Yacht Club with races taking place under the watchful gaze of the Statue of Liberty herself!

    All races start and finish from the Honorable William Wall, Manhattan Yacht Club’s floating clubhouse anchored in the harbor. This means races can start upwind or downwind, depending on weather and current conditions.

    Participating teams are encouraged to start sailing on Friday June 7th, the boats will be available for a practice day from 1000 to 1600 hours and a practice race will be taking place at 1600 hrs.

    Any team of U.S. women sailors can apply to participate. To be considered for an invitation, please email “This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.”. The entry fee is $350 that covers the cost of the boat charter. The damage deposit is $500.  Please note the deadline for entry is May 15.

     If you have any questions, please contact the Manhattan Yacht Club at 212-786-3323. For more information and to request entry go to myc.org/racing-home/lady-liberty-regatta.  For more Manhattan YC Lady Liberty Cup sailing information


     
    Oregon Offshore Race Announcement!
    (Portland, OR)- The 43rd Annual Oregon Offshore International Yacht Race, sponsored by Schooner Creek Boatworks, is scheduled to start on May 9th, 2019.  This 193-mile race starts at Buoy 2 off the Columbia River entrance and finishes at the entrance to Victoria, BC harbor.

    So far, there are twenty participants and Corinthian YC Portland is expecting a few more sign-ups. The entrants so far are the usual who’s who of the Portland sailing community, with some very welcome participants coming from out of the area.  A top local boat includes Scott Campbell’s beautiful new RIVA, a state of the art J/121, crewed by the usual group of local rock stars.

    In addition to other local regulars, there is Phillip Wampold’s J/92 ZAFF RACING, the J/40 VELOCITY skippered by Thomas Keffer, and the Portland J/105 Fleet has a one-design start with three entrants (ABSTRACT, Dennis Sibilla’s ESCAPE ARTIST, and of course FREE BOWL OF SOUP (their 6th time!)!

    This year, in conjunction with the Royal Victoria Yacht Club, the event is featuring the First Annual Cascadia Cup, which will award a trophy to the competitor with the lowest combined time in the Oregon Offshore and qualifying races of the Swiftsure event.

    The Oregon Offshore skippers meeting and raffle will be held at the Rogue Brew Pub in Astoria, Oregon on May 8th starting at 6 pm.  The race will start in the morning of May 9th just off Astoria at the opening of the Columbia River. This will be another great race in the long history of the Oregon Offshore. For more Oregon Offshore Race sailing information
     

    Calling All J/Crews- Edgartown Race Week & Round Island Beckons!
    (Edgartown, MA)— J/Boat teams are always a big part of the action at Edgartown Yacht Club Race Weekend, and this year organizers are putting out an “A.P.B.” to all J/Fest participants and others who own J/Boats, inviting them to join the fun on Martha’s Vineyard over July 25th to 27th, 2019.

    The three-day competition starts on Thursday with two days of ’Round-the-Buoys (’RTB) racing and finishes on Saturday with a choice of distance races: the traditional 56 nautical-mile ’Round-the-Island (’RTI) race and, introduced last year, the 20 nm ’Round-the-Sound (’RTS) race.


    Sailors can choose to sail on all three days or just in one or the other of the distance races. Either way, there’s something for everyone and something extra for J/Boat teams in the ‘RTI race. A three-boat team, representing any given yacht club and with PHRF-NE rated entries in more than one division, qualifies for first-, second-, and third-place trophies based on best-corrected times. As well, there are top-three prizes for the best individual corrected time out of all J/Boats in the ’RTI.

    As one of the smallest boats in the fleet last year, Ira Perry’s (Padanaram, Mass.) J/29 SEEFEST won the best-corrected-time J/Boat trophy in the ’RTI and finished second in his class. Perry has won the race a handful of times since he first sailed it in 2001 and has only missed a few years of competing here.

    “It’s just spectacular scenery, some of the most beautiful in the area,” said Perry, “and the race is always tactically challenging, especially in light air when you need to concentrate on keeping the boat moving, but last year there was plenty of wind, and we were in by 4 p.m.”

    Perry added that, as always is the case, the weekend will double as a getaway with his wife and kids, and this year he’s considering joining the ’Round-the-Buoys racing if his crew can come in early.

    “Edgartown Yacht Club runs a great regatta, and they work hard to make the experience the best it can possibly be,” said Perry. “The organizers are very accommodating, and they ask for and listen to feedback, making changes according to it. You don’t see that happening too often with other regattas.”

    Other J/Boat skippers signed up for the ’RTI are Edgartown Race Weekend veterans and past winners Ed Dailey and Richard Egan, entered, respectively, with the J/109 RAPTOR and the J/46 WINGS.


    Brand new to the event will be Daniel Heun (Franklin, Mass.) skippering his J/122 MOXIEE in both the ’Round-the-Buoys races and the ’Round-the-Sound race. Huen has had his boat since 2014, having progressed from owning and racing a J/24, to a J/29, and then a J/105.

    “When you want a new boat it usually is bigger than the last one,” said Heun, “and this one (hull #85 at 40 feet) is fit for cruising, with cherry joinery below, a refrigerator, etc., so the first couple of nights we’ll stay on it on the mooring, and then I’ll move ashore when my wife and daughter come in on Friday.”

    Heun, a veteran of the Chicago to Mackinac Race, Newport to Bermuda Race, Block Island Race Week and other “racer’s races”, says he and his crew try to choose at least one weekend regatta each season where the families can be part of the fun.

    “Edgartown Race Weekend is perfect, because it’s a long weekend instead of a week, and it’s in July, so it’s warm,” said Heun. “We’re planning on having good days of racing on Thursday, Friday and Saturday while our families enjoy the beaches and shopping, and then we’ll have good dinners ashore with them each evening. We debated doing the ’RTI, but with the ’RTS we’re assured of getting back by late afternoon, and we’ll still be able to enjoy Edgartown after racing.”

    Edgartown Race Weekend divisions are for IRC, ORC, ORR, PHRF-NE (including Spinnaker and Non-Spinnaker), Classic, One-Design, Multihull and Doublehanded boats. ’RTI/’RTS and ‘RTB are scored separately, with top-three prizes awarded in each class.

    Registration deadline for the ’Round-the-Island and ’Round-the Sound races is Wednesday, July 24, 2019.  (Registration deadline for team sign-up is Monday, July 22.) The entry fee for ’RTS is $125 ($150 after July 6). The fee for the ’RTI is $250.00 ($325 after July 5, 2019).

    Registration deadline for the ’Round-the-Buoy races is Tuesday, July 23, 2019. The entry fee for ’RTB is $50 each day.

    A Mount Gay-sponsored “Jump-Up” party on Friday night (July 26), and awards on both Friday afternoon and Sunday morning (July 28), round out the full social schedule.

    To request a mooring, contact Clare Sullivan at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Follow Edgartown Yacht Club Racing on Facebook here.  For more information Edgartown Race Week sailing information
     

    Regatta & Show Schedules:

    Mar 17- Apr 28- Warsash Spring Series- Warsash, England
    Apr 14-20- Les Voiles de Saint-Barth Regatta- Gustavia, St. Barth
    Apr 18-22- SPI Ouest France Regatta- La Trinite sur Mer, France
    Apr 20-21- J/22 Van Uden Ecco Regatta- Stellendam, Netherlands
    Apr 26-28- Newport to Ensenada Race- Newport Beach, CA
    Apr 27-28- American YC Spring Series- Rye, NY
    Apr 28- May 3- Antigua Sailing Week- English Harbour, Antigua
    May 3-5- Annapolis NOOD Regatta- Annapolis, MD
    May 3-5- Yachting Cup Regatta- San Diego, CA
    May 4-10- J/24 European Championship- Patras, Greece
    May 4- RORC Cervantes Cup Race- Cowes, England
    May 9-12- SAILING Champions League- Palma Mallorca, Spain
    May 10-12- Grand Prix de St Cast- St Cast, France
    May 10-12- RORC Vice Admiral’s Cup- Cowes, England

    For additional J/Regatta and Event dates in your region, please refer to the on-line J/Sailing Calendar.

     
    Blustery, Sunny SPERRY Charleston Race Week
    (Charleston, SC)- No question, there is no more picturesque sight than Charleston Harbor during the SPERRY Charleston Race Week regatta that brings international recognition to the historic city. A fleet of almost 260 sailboats in 18 different classes took over almost every inch of the Cooper River and was truly a sight to behold all weekend-long. With seven different race courses set in various pockets of Charleston Harbor, a spectator viewing from land could see colorful billowing sails everywhere they looked!  And, what a spectacle it was for three straight days of sailing.

    It is not hard to see why over 115 J/Teams enjoyed their annual spring pilgrimage down to this jewel in the deep South.  No one could complain, three straight days of good weather, good breezes, plenty of sun, and random squalls on Sunday to spice things up a bit!

    The regatta featured six one-design J/Classes, including J/22s, J/24s, J/70s, J/80s, J/88s, and J/105s.  In addition, there were two “Pursuit-style” sailing divisions for both PHRF and ORC handicap rated boats that includes a J/30, J/35, J/109s, J/111s, J/120s and a J/122.

    Day 1- Beautiful Southeasters!
    The weekend got off to a rip-roaring start with south-southeasterly winds ranging from 10 to 20 knots, allowing organizers to complete four races for most of the classes doing windward-leeward courses.

    There was some great action on the inside courses with the wind shifting wildly at times and a short squall wreaking some havoc then causing conditions to change significantly.

    Class newcomer Buddy Cribb sailed VICTORY into the early lead in the J/70 class, largest of the regatta with 56 boats. Barr Batzer was aboard as tactician while Scott Ewing (headsail trimmer) and Chris Manson-Hing (bow) completed the crew as VICTORY posted a solid score line of 1-3-4.

    “We got good starts, we went the right way and we went fast. We also didn’t do anything too risky,” said Cribb, a resident of Jupiter, Florida.

    Cribb had been sailing in the Etchells class for 15 years and suddenly decided to “give something different a try.” The Coral Reef Yacht Club member has about nine regattas under his belt and has clearly climbed the learning curve quite quickly.

    J/70 class leaders have requested just three races per day and VICTORY holds a two-point lead over Joel Ronning and the CATAPULT team going into Saturday’s action.

    “This is a really tough fleet, so we’ll see if we can keep it going,” said Cribb, whose last appearance at Sperry Charleston Race Week came about eight years ago with the Etchells.

    Mike Bruno has been bringing his J/88 WINGS to Sperry Charleston Race Week for several years and has never come away victorious– not even a runner-up finish or, for that matter, anywhere near the podium! The Armonk, New York native is hoping his team’s success on Friday is a good omen as WINGS began the regatta with results of 2-2-1 before a blown-out spinnaker led to a fifth in Race 4.

    “We had really good starts and really good boat speed,” Bruno said. “Our boat tends to be quicker in a breeze so we were glad to see the velocity increase as the day went along.”

    Bruno said Wings was overlapped with EXILE and SPACEMAN SPIFF at the finish of the two races it placed second. “For some reasons I’ve been jinxed in this regatta. Hopefully, things will finally come together this year,” he said.

    Warrior Sailing 1, skippered by Sammy Hodges, grabbed the early lead in the J/22 class after winning two races and placing second in two others. Navy veteran Ruben Munoz (jib) and Army veteran Troy Rasmussen (main) are the warriors aboard the boat.

    “This is my first time competing here at Charleston and it was really cool out there,” Munoz said. “We worked really well together as a team, which was great to see.”

    College of Charleston sailor Carson Shields worked the bow aboard Warrior Sailing 1, which benefitted from doing two practice sessions on Thursday. “I’m so impressed with the improvement Ruben and Troy made in the span of just one day on the boat,” Hodges said.

    On the offshore Hybrid Pursuit classes, the ORC Class A, B and C entries had a light start to the day– taking more than three hours to complete the 7.4-mile out-bound course due to the flood current and light air under eight knots.

    Despite the light air and challenging conditions, the Pursuit Race concept seemed to work across the wide variety of boat types in this division– ranging from Victor Wild’s speedy TP52 Fox to Miles Martschink’s J/105– because the racing in corrected time was also close with the top eight places in Race 1 within one minute.

    Robin Team, a multi-time Palmetto Trophy winner, led the J/122 TEAMWORK to victory in both races on Friday. Team said the return race into Charleston Harbor, which began with a fleet start, was approximately 9 ½ miles due to a windward jaunt to a drop mark.

    “We’re primarily accustomed to doing windward-leeward courses around the buoys so this point-to-point racing was a little different for us, but a fun challenge for our crew,” Team said.

    Team credited tactician Jonathan Bartlett with making some “extraordinary calls” during the Pursuit Race into the Atlantic Ocean. “That, coupled with Kevin Ryman’s great navigation, gave us a leg up on the race out,” said Team, who praised his brother Adam for doing an “incredible job” of trimming the spinnaker during the race back into the harbor, which was primarily a downwind affair.

    Day 2- Sunny, Breezy Southerly, Again?!
    Charleston Harbor was pretty much becalmed as sailors made their way to the docks on Saturday morning. Some of the professional tacticians encouraged event director Randy Draftz to post an onshore postponement in order to give the sea breeze time to fill in.

    However, Draftz has been running Sperry Charleston Race Week for a long time and knows the conditions here better than anyone. He decided to send the 257-boat fleet out on time, but instructed principal race officers on all seven circles to error on the side of caution. “We’d rather have one good race than three bad ones,” Draftz said.

    It turns out concerns about the wind velocity were unfounded. In typical Charleston fashion, the breeze built throughout the day and organizers got in four races again on Saturday- two light air starts in the morning followed by two medium breeze starts in the afternoon. Most importantly, all the racing was fair and gave the sailors quality racing in the challenging venue.

    “It was a very challenging day on the water,” said Pamela Rose, skipper of the J/70 ROSEBUD. “I give my crew a lot of credit for having the ability to tune the boat accurately for the changing conditions.”

    Joel Ronning and his CATAPULT crew had a dominant day within the J/70 fleet. Ronning steered CATAPULT to victory in all four races, an extremely difficult accomplishment considering the caliber of competition.

    “It was a really fun day to say the least,” said Ronning, who went right back on the water for an evening sail with his daughter and girlfriend.

    Class veteran Victor Diaz De Leon was calling tactics on CATAPULT with Charleston local Patrick Wilson trimming the headsails and Christopher Stocke working the bow. Factor in a win to close out Friday’s action and Catapult has posted five straight bullets en route to a low score of 14 points.

    “One thing about this team is that we have a tremendous amount of fun together. It’s a very harmonious group,” said Ronning, who captured J/70 class and earned the Charleston Race Week Cup in 2017. “Victor Diaz is a brilliant tactician and the communication on the boat is tremendous. Patrick and Christopher are fantastic about feeding information to Victor.”

    ROSEBUD held second place in J/70 class, 19 points behind CATAPULT and six ahead of VICTORY (Buddy Cribb). This was Rose’s third time at Sperry Charleston Race Week and this is the highest she has been in J/70 class.

    “I love coming to Charleston because it’s such a dynamite venue. This is by far the best results I’ve had in this regatta and it’s because I have such a great crew,” Rose said.

    Lucas Calabrese, part of the 2018 J/70 World Championship crew, is calling tactics for the Chicago & Florida owner along with Jud Smith (the 2018 J/70 World Champion skipper). “It’s really tough out there, so you have to keep your head out of the boat and work hard to stay in phase,” Calabrese said.

    SHENANIGANS, sailed by the husband and wife tandem of Bill and Shannon Lockwood, had set a strong pace in J/80 class- getting the gun in five of eight starts. The Annapolis boat has a couple seconds and a third for a low score of nine points, but was still just three clear of the second place boat. ELEVEN, another Annapolis entry skippered by Bert Carp, had also posted a steady string of top three finishes highlighted by three bullets.

    Carter White and his crew on YouREGATTA had put forth a masterful performance in J/24 class, winning six straight races after beginning the regatta with a second. White, who hails from Portland, Maine, had built an eight-point lead on LEVEL PELICAN (Crisp McDonald).

    Day 3-  Spectacular, Blustery Finale
    The regatta concluded in spectacular fashion with strong winds producing exciting action and several classes being decided during the last race.

    The J/88 class saw the battle go right down to the wire in the final race. Mike Bruno said following Friday’s racing that he’d been jinxed at Sperry Charleston Race Week, suffering problems that prevented podium finishes in 2018 and 2017. He thought his bad luck would be extended when WINGS was ruled on-course-side in Race 9 and had to restart.

    “We came into the day saying we were going to be conservative and not make any mistakes. Then, we got tangled up with another boat at the start and right out of the gate we were over early,” said Bruno, who did manage to battle back to finish sixth in the 10-boat fleet. “We were pretty glum going into the last race. I thought we’d blown it again.”  At that point, Bruno’s WINGS team had dropped into 2nd place, two points back from the lead.

    However, there was a happy ending as WINGS redeemed itself big-time in Race 10, which was held in 20-25 knot south-southwesterly winds with gusts approaching 30 kts. WINGS basically had to win the race and hope for the best, letting the chips fall where they may. After rough going on the first weather leg, WINGS rounded the first weather mark in sixth, then moved up a couple places by the downwind rounding. Bruno and crew turned it on from there, passing the remaining three boats to get the gun in a cloud of spray on the final, full-on, planing-mode run into the downwind finish line.

    That victory in the final start of the three-day regatta gave WINGS a two-point victory over ALBONDINGAS (Justin Scagnelli, West Nyack, NY), leading Bruno to breathe a huge sigh of relief. Third was Rob Ruhlman’s family crew on SPACEMAN SPIFF from Cleveland, OH.

    “What an exciting way to win a regatta. To come from behind like that was thrilling and I feel fantastic,” Bruno said. “We like heavy air, so we were really happy when the breeze really came on for that last race. It was really exhilarating blasting downwind in planing mode and passing boat after boat.”

    Bruno noted the average age of his crew is 60, with bow man Jonathan Asch checking in at 66. Stuart Johnstone called tactics, Chris Morgan trimmed the main, while Steve Lopez and Tim Randall teamed to trim the headsails aboard Wings.

    TEAMWORK, a J/122 owned by Robin Team of Lexington, North Carolina, earned the Palmetto Trophy for the fifth time at Sperry Charleston Race Week! Jonathan Bartlett called tactics on TEAMWORK, which won all six races in ORC B class on the Hybrid Pursuit course.

    “We’ve been coming to Charleston for a long time and we absolutely love this regatta,” said Team, whose previous Palmetto Trophy wins were as top PHRF entry. Now TEAMWORK has another one for their trophy shelf for best performance among ORC entries after duking it out with the J/111 SITELLA (Ian Hill, Chesapeake, VA).

    “We had a great time mixing it up with Sitella, which is always well-sailed,” Team said. “We had the boat well-prepped and dialed in from the beginning, while our crew work was incredible once again.”

    Joel Ronning and his CATAPULT crew secured a surprisingly convincing victory in J/70 class. Victor Diaz De Leon served as tactician on CATAPULT, which won six of nine races in posting a low score of 20 points– 20 better than runner-up ROSEBUD (Pamela Rose, Aventura, FL).  Third went to Cribb’s VICTORY, fourth to Henry Brauer’s RASCAL and fifth to John & Molly Baxter’s TEAM VINEYARD VINES.

    “We had some really fortunate breaks this week. There is nothing like having luck on your side. Sometimes the karma is with you and this is one of those instances,” said Ronning, a resident of Excelsior, Minnesota. “I’ve always loved sailing in Charleston and this year’s regatta was an awful lot of fun.”

    Diaz De Leon joined the team about six months ago and Ronning has been impressed by the way he’s blended in with holdovers Christopher Stocke (bow) and Patrick Wilson (headsail trimmer).

    “Our team communication is the strongest I’ve ever seen on a boat. We’ve been clicking really well together and the chemistry is the best it’s ever been on the boat,” Ronning said. “Victor was getting great information from Chris and Patrick and was really on fire this week in terms of making the calls.”

    Carter White skippered YouREGATTA to the most dominant victory of 2019 Sperry Charleston Race Week, winning seven straight races in J/24 class after placing second in Friday’s opener. YouREGATTA did not start Race 9 and still finished 12 points clear of Level Pelican (Crisp McDonald (Charleston, S.C.). Third was Cameron Rylance’s THAT’LL DO PIG.

    Molly White worked the bow for her husband, who has been racing a J/24 for more than two decades. Michael McAllister called tactics, Ted Wiedeke trimmed the spinnaker while Chris Lombardo trimmed the genoa.

    “It’s really about our team. We’ve been sailing together for four years and do five to six major regattas a year,” said White, who hails from Portland, Maine. “We have a routine that really works and puts us in a different league. Our consistency and ability to adapt to changing conditions is crucial. We had to shift gears constantly and our crew is capable of doing that.”

    SHENANIGANS came away as winner of J/80 class following a tight three-way battle with fellow Annapolis entry ELEVEN (Bert Carp). Shannon Lockwood steered while her father Bill trimmed the main. Jeff Todd handled headsails while his daughter Cassie worked the bow.

    “We had a great battle with Bert, who we race against on Thursday nights in Annapolis,” said Shannon Lockwood, who was a member of the keelboat team at St. Mary’s College. “I thought our team handled the boat well and paid attention to the puffy and shifty conditions. We were also conservative and smart with our maneuvers. It’s always cool to win, especially at such a major regatta like Charleston so we’re super psyched.”

    Warrior Sailing 1, skippered by Sammy Hodges, led from start to finish in J/22 class – winning five races and having the luxury of skipping the last. Navy veteran Ruben Munoz (jib) and Army veteran Troy Rasmussen (main) were the warriors aboard the boat. “Tiger Woods won the Masters today, but that doesn’t even compare to what we did,” Munoz said proudly. “We came here to have fun and learn so winning is icing on the cake.”

    This was the first sailing experience for Rasmussen, who gave credit to Hodges for helming and coaching at the same time. “Sammy was awesome about keeping us on point and teaching all the little nuances,” he said.

    Finally on the last day of competition the wind gods permitted the ORC Hybrid Pursuit entries to enjoy the intended three-race daily format: a morning pursuit distance race from the harbor to the offshore course area, followed by a windward-leeward buoy race, and ending with another distance race to the harbor.

    “This Hybrid Pursuit style was well received by all the boats and we enjoyed it,” Team said.

    Principal race officer added a second windward-leeward race to make up for the fact Saturday’s Hybrid Pursuit was abandoned. ORC D was won by SKIMMER, a locally-based J/105 team led by Miles Martschink and Ben Hagood.

    “This was our first experience with ORC racing,” said Tucker, “and with some more measurements we probably could have optimized our rating a little better. Yet on the whole we thought the ratings were fair.”

    A pair of Charleston entries came out on top on the regular Pursuit Race courses with Wadmalaw Island resident Bill Hanckel skippering his J/120 EMOCEAN to a two-point victory in Spinnaker PHRF A. Third were “the kids”, the College of Charleston Sailing Team racing the beautifully restored J/36 SOUL. Sailing photo credits- Nancy Bloom / Priscilla Parker / TimWilkes.com / Photoboat.com-Alan Clark.  For more Charleston Race Week sailing information
     

     
    Les Voiles de St Barths X Edition Update
    (Gustavia Harbor, St Barths)- The tenth edition of the Voiles de Saint Barth started on Monday this past week.  A fleet of fifty-five offshore racing thoroughbreds has enjoyed the spectacular aquamarine waters around St Barths for the past three days.  Thursday is the infamous “Nikki Beach Club” day-off, where teams party and play, eat lots of “sushi boats” and consume copious quantities of the famous “pink rose’” wine from jeroboam bottles.  Racing continues on Friday and Saturday.

    The third day of racing at Les Voiles de St. Barth sent the fleets on the Round the Island race in which local knowledge paid off with few surprises in the results.

    The race veterans knew how to successfully navigate the challenges and opportunities on the 24–32 nautical mile courses around St. Barth’s rocky cliffs and surrounding volcanic rock landmarks. The 12 to 15 knots and northeast direction also provided 30-degree wind shifts to further challenge the nine classes.

    “Sailing in St. Barth’s is never easy,” said Luc Poupon, Race Organizer. “There is much to navigate around with the rocks and it’s not as simple as it seems to negotiate. Clearly, knowing the nuances of sailing around St. Barth helps, and today is a perfect example, especially, as competitors had to deal with the large wind shifts.”

    After posting a 2-1-1, Pamala Baldwin’s J/122 LIQUID from Antigua holds a strong lead in CSA 4 Racing class. Meanwhile, Chris Body’s United Kingdom team has posted a 3-5-3 and is now sitting in 4th place and is within striking distance of a podium finish for both J/122s!   For more Les Voiles de Saint Barth sailing information
     

     
    French Dominate World Sailing Nations Cup
    (San Francisco, CA)- The 2019 edition of the World Sailing Nations Cup was sailed on a fleet of matched J/22s on San Francisco Bay, hosted by the St Francis Yacht Club.  The event is emblematic of the world sailing championship for Open and Women’s match racing teams.  In the end, the French dominated nearly from beginning to end, despite the best efforts of truly world-class American teams like StFYC’s own Nicole Breault!  Here is what took place day-to-day in this remarkable event.

    Day 1- All Bullets for American Breault and the French (Courtois and Mesnil)
    It was picket fences for both French teams– top-ranked Women’s skipper Pauline Courtois and Open Division skipper Maxime Mesnil, as well as defending Nations Cup Women’s Champion Nicole Breault (USA) after the first day of racing.

    Competition commenced with 10 women’s division teams from around the world facing off in round robin format on two east-west race courses. Ripples of current snaking across the courses made for challenging conditions for first-timers to San Francisco Bay sailing. “It was really difficult with the current, but my team did a really good job,” said Courtois, of her Match in Pink Normandy Elite Team of Maelenn Lemaitre, Loise Acker and Sophie Faguet. “We had really good, close matches in difficult conditions. There were no surprises, but it is important to keep focused and watch the water and the current.”

    Anna Östling (SWE) currently in third place with three wins echoed the sentiment to stay focused: “Our first race with [Juliana] Senfft (BRA) we had a penalty at the start and were able to wipe it and give her one right at the finish line. It was one of those races where you think, think, think and finally get the win.”

    “It was a really fun start to the event,” she added. “This is the kind of sailing we love.”

    Defending Women’s Champion, and Bay local, Nicole Breault, raved about the caliber and tightness of competition. “You have to capitalize on their mistakes, because they’re capitalizing on yours.”

    Asked if she had any unforgettable moments on the racecourse today, she recalled her match against fellow USA skipper, Allie Blecher.

    “We were trailing around the leeward mark, but really close. We rolled into a tack, got our bow forward and I realized we’d rolled over our spinnaker sheets.” With the drag of the sheets slowing them down during the short second beat, Breault’s bow Hannah Burroughs was all over the deck recovering and retying them. “We rounded, tucked to the inside, got control of them, and had the most perfect spinnaker set. We ended up passing them and winning the race.”

    The morning’s light northerly winds eventually clocked to the west and built to the high teens delivering more robust afternoon conditions for the nine Open Division teams. The tail end of a strong flood tide pushed competitors close to shore seeking relief and moments of lift in reversing ebb. This made for fantastic viewing from StFYC’s clubhouse of a series of dial-downs between David Rae (RSA) and Henrique Haddad (BRA) in a match ultimately won by Haddad. By day’s end, the ebb had shortened the average match times from 16 minutes to 11, noted World Sailing’s Technical Director and PRO David Campbell-James.

    “We had a very nice day,” said Maxime Mesnil (FRA), sailing with Match In Black Normandy Elite Team members Hugo Feydit, Yann Chateau and Yves-Marie Pilon. “Last week we were at Congressional Cup and today we had more wins than all of last week. It was a very good start to the event.” A neck-and-neck match against Pearson Potts (USA) had spectators out of their seats as the two boats rounded the windward mark, raised their chutes for the downwind with Mesnil quickly luffing Potts to the north, their hulls careening wildly in the building seas. “I thought I had a penalty,” Mesnil explained, “So I was trying to penalize him, but my team said no, we are fine.” Eventually bearing off, Mesnil sent it for the finish line and squeaked out the win.

    Tomorrow, he’ll be up against Haddad, who also had a strong day, and Ettore Botticini (ITA) who’s hoping for more wins than he scored during his first day sailing in San Francisco. “Today was hard. We lost, not the most important matches, but the ones we wanted to win,” he said. “We improved a lot through the day, but tomorrow we need to do better.”

    Day 2- Mesnil Leads Open Division, Breault Undefeated in Women’s
    Maxime Mesnil (FRA) dominated the Open Division during the second day of racing. In the Women’s Division Nicole Breault (USA) and Pauline Courtois (FRA) continued to rack up wins through the afternoon, sailing into a late afternoon face-off with seven wins each; the eighth was Breault’s.

    Mesnil opened the day winning a tight race against Henrique Haddad (BRA), who’s standing at second place after completing Stage 1 of the round robin. In a morning plagued by a delayed start, fluky wind and unpredictable current on the Cityfront course at St. Francis Yacht Club, Mesnil went on to display smooth, economic boat handling skills as he battled with Nick Egnot-Johnson (NZ) and Ettore Botticini (ITA). Mesnil won against the Kiwis, but stalled out in a twist of luck against Botticini, who managed to hang onto the edge of a wind line and finish first, keeping him in the running as they head into day three of racing.

    “We had a very good day and we sailed fast,” said Mesnil. “We lost that match, but we won the stage.”

    Haddad, who hasn’t match raced since the 2013 Nations Cup and is sailing with a tactician, Leonardo Lombardi, who’s never match raced in his life, said the opportunity to sail on San Francisco Bay outweighed the uncertainty of how they might do. “We’re very pleased with our performance,” he said, adding, “It’s not done yet.”

    James Hodgson (AUS), now sitting at third place, opened the day with a loss to David Rae (RSA) followed by two wins, one against his Kiwi neighbors. “They beat us at our last event, the Hardy Cup in Sydney, so it was definitely good to get one up on them,” said Hodgson, who noted that the racing has been consistently close, “which you expect at an event like this. No race is easy. Usually we have a couple where we can keep it simple and win on speed. No one here is taking it easy.”

    Breault went into the day knowing she’d be up against the top-ranked skippers at the competition and was hoping to lock in at least two wins. “We raced Anna Östling in the second match and I knew it was going to be huge. It was getting windy. We were able to luff her in the pre-start and timed it perfectly, holding it just long enough so she had to peel off to port and we were able to start ahead. On that upwind, we felt ready for the breeze. We were hiking really hard, trimming in sync and we felt really fast,” recounted Breault, who’s defending her Nations Cup title against women she emphasizes are just plain good. “The boat handling and pre-start action has been phenomenal.”

    Up against Courtois, Breault said, “Pauline had control of us in the beginning,” but, “we had an awesome set, shot downwind, no engagement and it turned into a drag race.”

    Courtois went on to win her remaining matches and sits at second place. Östling, poised at third place and one win up on Allie Blecher (USA) and Juliana Senfft (BRA), said, “We need to stay on our toes.”

    Day 3- Courtois Leads Women, Anyone’s Game in the Open Division
    Pauline Courtois (FRA) ran a picket fence during Day 3 of racing. Nicole Breault (USA), went into the day’s racing undefeated, but suffered a loss to Anna Östling (SWE) in the first match, going on to win against Allie Blecher (USA), Juliana Senfft (BRA) and Clare Costanzo (AUS). The two leaders then faced off in the day’s final flight, with Courtois besting Breault.

    In the Open Division, Maxime Mesnil (FRA) and James Hodgson (AUS) each have a 3-1 score line, but it remains anyone’s game as racing continues in the double round robin tomorrow.

    Day 3 dawned with a repechage for four Open Division teams and five Women’s teams, all competing for the chance to continue racing in Stage 3. Those two coveted spots were taken by Costanzo in the Women’s Division and Nick Egnot-Johnson (NZ) in the Open Division.

    As a testament to just how close the sailing has been, the Women’s Division teams from Australia, Sweden, Finland, South Africa and Great Britain swapped wins and losses, resulting in an unbreakable three-way tie. Stage 1 standings came into play, allowing Costanzo to advance and leaving Johanna Bergqvist and Marinella Laaksonen on the sidelines for the remainder of racing at St. Francis Yacht Club.

    “It finally feels like we got things under control and now it’s not enough,” said Bergqvist, who lost her first race of the day then had a fantastic comeback in a match against Laaksonen in which they battled tack for tack to the windward mark, rounding and setting in sync. Bergqvist, slightly behind and to port, was able to push Laaksonen off to the north enough to come ahead in the gybe and lay the finish in a beautiful bit of boat handling.

    Bergqvist, Costanzo and Laaksonen with three wins each, all went on to win one against each other, creating an unbreakable tie settled in favor of Costanzo due to her higher ranking from Stage 1.

    Excited to have the opportunity to continue competing, Costanzo called the next stage a “redemption round,” saying that she’d had close races with all the top women she would now face again.

    “This morning, it was everything to lose and now it’s everything to win,” said her sister, Juliet Costanzo, who sails with her.

    The Open Division raced a knock-out round, with Ettore Botticini (ITA) beating Kohei Ichikawa (JPN) 2-1 and Egnot-Johnson beating David Rae (RSA) 2-0, then going on to nab two more bullets against Botticini to advance to Stage 3.

    Egnot-Johnson echoed the sentiment that the racing has been incredibly even and close. “Anyone could win this regatta,” he said. With minimal experience racing J/22s in the breeze-on conditions of San Francisco Bay, during Stage 3 he managed to score wins against front-runner Mesnil and Pearson Potts (USA). Potts had a string of losses but scored one against Open Division defending champion Vladimir Lipavsky (RUS), who had a sluggish day on the water with just one win against Henrique Haddad (BRA). 

    Day 4- French Sweep Nations Cup Grand Final
    Pauline Courtois (FRA) and Maxime Mesnil (FRA) took top honors respectively in the Women’s and Open Divisions at World Sailing’s Nations Cup Grand Final, hosted by St. Francis Yacht Club in San Francisco, CA.

    Courtois and her Match in Pink by Normandy Elite Team of Maelenn Lemaitre, Loise Acker and Sophie Faguet opened the day with a 2-0 lead over Anna Östling (SWE). Östling scored a crucial point in their first match and kept the pressure on Courtois, but in their fourth and final race, Courtois was able to pour on enough speed to clear a penalty just before crossing the finish line a few boat lengths ahead of Östling.

    Meanwhile, Nicole Breault (USA) sailed two strong races with commanding leads against Juliana Senfft (BRA) earning her spot in the final.

    Close racing ruled the Open Division from the end of the semifinals all the way through the last match of the day. Mesnil’s Match in Black by Normandy Elite Team of Hugo Feydit, Yann Chateau, Yves-Marie Pilon scored two against Pearson Potts (USA), getting back in the game after two early losses in the semifinals. James Hodgson (AUS) locked in an early win versus Henrique Haddad (BRA) and the two went into their second race of the day neck and neck around the course, sailing cleaner than the previous day. On the second downwind leg, Hodgson had a smoother set to the chute and galloped into the lead, but Haddad managed to close the gap. Both gybed solidly to lay a photo finish, with the point going to Haddad. The four Open Division teams sailed a fifth flight, tucking tightly to shore along the south end of the course to seek relief from the strong flood current. Mesnil and Haddad both managed to gain control and hold it steady during the downwind legs to cross first ahead of Potts and Hodgson, respectively.

    In the Final Round Mesnil bested Haddad 3-1. Courtois kept up the speed in her battles with Breault, who tore a spinnaker in a very close first match giving Courtois the opportunity to attack from leeward, luff her and offset a penalty she’d picked up earlier. Breault was never able to scratch ahead enough to score a point and Courtois won it 3-0. 

    “It was a good fight. We didn’t make it easy, but they owned us,” said Breault, who was racing with the same Team Vela members Molly Carapiet, Karen Loutzenheiser and Hannah Burroughs from 2015 Nations Cup, defending their Women’s Championship title. “The losses live with you, but we can’t wait to do battle again,” she said.

    Courtois had only praise for her rival, Breault, recalling that “four years ago we were in the Nations Cup Final in Vladivostok, Russia against them, and we lost 3-1; so to win these three races today was incredible,” she said. “It’s an amazing place to sail.”

    Mesnil said the matches against Haddad were tricky, but the elevated wind conditions helped put his team on the podium, which he’s delighted to be sharing with “the women’s team, who are our training partners.”

    “A nation wins the Nations Cup,” said Michael O’Connor, Nations Cup Working Party Chair in World Sailing. “Many of the countries who came are emerging nations in match racing- we want to build a platform for it.”

    Haddad concurred that the event helps the sport in general. “We started in match racing 12 years ago because we had the Nations Cup in Brazil,” he said, thanking his team for coming together to compete once again.

    Östling and Senfft finished third and fourth respectively, with Östling scoring two points in quick succession during the petit-finals. Hodgson and Potts battled for a medal in the Open Division, with Hodgson beating him 2-0 to finish third overall.

    “Brazil sailed better than us and deserved the spot,” said Hodgson. “We’re super happy with how we sailed today. These were the most fun matches of the regatta for us, my crew was really on and we’re grateful to the Cruising Yacht Club of Australia for supporting us and St. Francis Yacht Club for hosting us.”

    “We’re pleased with how racing played out and entertained viewers in and around the club. What was unique about the venue was the public had commanding view of the racing – all the tactics and execution were visible to everybody, whether you were a junior or a match race champion, you could learn from watching,” said Regatta Chair Bruce Stone. “One of the challenges of the final day of racing was the current and who could get in to the rocks first. The tide charts were not accurate due to snowmelt from the Sierra Mountains and outflow from Oroville Dam. While we short-tack the shore often here, I’ve never seen it done so tightly in all my years here."

    Photos by Chris Ray – team photos, videos from drone, and all days up to Saturday:

    Photos by Leslie Richter from Sunday, the final day of racing:

    Photos by Gerard Sheridan of awards ceremony:

    Photos and video by Gerard Sheridan of each day of racing:

    For more J/22 World Sailing Nations Cup sailing information
     

     
    Warsash Spring Series- Weekend V Report
    (Warsash, England)- Ian Wilson & Marshall King's SOAK RACING started the J/70 UK Grand Slam Series in style, winning the opening round of the nine-regatta Grand Slam Series. SOAK RACING scored five bullets out of eight races over the two days, including a hat trick on the last day. Second was Doug Struth's DSP, who scored two races wins, as well as two second places. Paul Ward's Eat, Sleep. J, Repeat was third, just one point ahead of Phil Rees racing Bryn. Ten teams made the top five over the course of the weekend.

    Conditions varied dramatically over the two days, with medium wind on the first day, followed by a full-on foam-up of 20 knots plus on the second day. Air and sea temperature was also a factor, as mid-April is about as cold as the water gets in the Solent, added to a bitter easterly breeze, it was a weekend for wrapping up and keeping warm.

    “The first day was all about keeping your head out of the boat with lots of gear changing, and the last race the following day, we had 25 knots of brutally cold easterly wind, I think we pulled 19.8 knots out of the boat downwind,” commented Ian Wilson. “The first day was really hard work, trying to spot what was coming next, and getting the right side of the shifts. Downwind, we were switching from planing to low mode, maybe changing mode up to five times. The last day was tough sailing, fresh to frightening, the day started in 16 knots and it built from there, to 20 knots in the second race, and the last race was filled with aggression. To be honest there were a few boats on the ears, beginning to struggle with the conditions, and the freezing conditions were like being slapped in the face with a plate glass – it was sharp, brutal even, when ever a wave came over the boat. It was great for us to have done all that training in Monaco during the winter, but with the best J/70 sailors coming to Torbay for the worlds later this year, we know that on current performance, we would struggle to make the top 20. A great start to the season but we have a lot to do.”

    Black Championship Report
    In the IRC 1 Class, Tony Mack’s J/111 McFLY is sitting in third place in the two weekend series. The J/109s are doing well in IRC 2 Class, with Simon Perry’s JIRAFFE in 2nd and Mike & Susie Yates’ JAGO in 4th. In the J/109 Class, Perry’s JIRAFFE leads, followed by the Yates’ JAGO in 2nd and David Richards’ JUMPING JELLYFISH in third position.

    Black Group Report
    In IRC 2 Class, Simon Perry’s J/109 JIRAFFE continues to hold on to 2nd place.  But, with toss races getting factored in, it is Charles Ivill’s J/112E DAVANTI TYRES that has raced up the ladder to now sit in the bronze position.

    Despite not having sailed races 3 & 4, David Greenhalgh’s J/92 J’RONIMO is now sitting in fourth place in IRC 3 class.

    With six races, the J/88 Class continues to see Gavin Howe’s TIGRIS topping the class with all bullets for 5 pts. Now that “toss races” are factored in, Dirk & Dianne Van Beek’s SABRIEL JR still hold on to 2nd place, while Richard Cooper’s JONGLEUR hangs on to third position.

    The J/109s have six races counting. Simon Perry’s JIRAFFE continues to lead with 7 pts, winning their fourth race last weekend. Chris Burleigh’s JYBE TALKIN stays in second with 18 pts, third is Rob Cotterill’s MOJO RISIN with 20 pts.  The balance of the top five is John Smart’s JUKE BOX in 4th and the Royal Air Force Sailing Association’s RED ARROW in 5th position.

    The J-Sprit class still sees Gavin Howe’s J/88 TIGRIS leading.  In fact, J/88s occupy the entire top five! SABRIEL JR is 2nd,  Kirsty & David Apthorp’s J/88 J-DREAM is 3rd, Tim Tolcher’s RAGING BULL is 4th, and Richard Cooper’s JONGLEUR is 5th.  Sailing photo credits- Andrew Adams/ CloseHauled Photography
    Follow the Warsash Spring Series on Facebook here  For more HELLY HANSEN Warsash Spring Series sailing information
     

    J/Community
    What friends, alumni, and crew of J/Boats are doing worldwide
    -----------
    * Dr. Willy Schwenzfeier: the only sailor to compete in all 24 Charleston Race Weeks

    When Willy Schwenzfeier first competed in Sperry Charleston Race Week, there were about 15 boats entered and nightly awards parties were held at Carolina Yacht Club.

    It was 1996 and Schwenzfeier, as one of the original members of the Charleston Ocean Racing Association (CORA), played a role in establishing the fledgling regatta.

    Schwenzfeier has watched the event grow and develop significantly since then and has been a loyal supporter throughout. The longtime Charleston resident has competed in all 24 editions of Sperry Charleston Race Week, the only boat owner to do so.

    “I remember the very first year there was this new sport-boat called a Melges 24 and it raced in PHRF and the skipper had to put a bow pulpit on it,” Schwenzfeier said with a laugh.

    Schwenzfeier has always campaigned a J/35 named Arrow and has done quite well in Sperry Charleston Race Week over the years, capturing class honors numerous times and finishing on the podium more often than he can count. Perhaps his most notable victory came onshore.

    “Beneteau sponsored Charleston Race Week during the early years and held a raffle for a five-day, four-night trip to Nautic Paris Boat Show,” Schwenzfeier said. “My wife bought the winning ticket and we got to go to Paris for a great vacation courtesy of Beneteau.”

    Dr. William Schwenzfeier originally came to Charleston in 1977 while serving as an ear, nose and throat specialist for the United States Navy. He was stationed at the Navy Regional Medical Center in the Holy City and enjoyed living here so much he stayed. Schwenzfeier ran a thriving practice known as Charleston ENT & Allergy up until his retirement six months ago. He also served as chairman of the ENT Department at Roper/St. Francis Hospitals.

    Schwenzfeier and his wife Caroline, who he met while attending college in Baltimore, live on James Island and berth their boat at Harborage on the Ashley River.

    Schwenzfeier played basketball at Johns Hopkins University while earning a degree in biology then attended medical school at the University of Florida. He bought the first J/35 in 1984 from renowned racer Charlie Scott, who owns a marina on Whitehall Creek in Annapolis.

    “I sailed the boat all the way from Annapolis to Charleston. It was an interesting trip,” Schwenzfeier said.

    Arrow actively participated in various offshore events organized by CORA and other organizations over the years. “We used to race up and down the coast all the time, but I don’t do overnights anymore,” Schwenzfeier said.

    Schwenzfeier has been blessed with a loyal and dedicated crew with five members having raced aboard the boat for 25 years or more. Topping the list is Jules Ivester, who is considered the co-skipper.

    “The joke is that it’s both of our boat, but I pay all the bills,” Schwenzfeier said with a chuckle.

    Ivester is an anesthesiologist and initially met Schwenzfeier in an operating room during a surgery. They hit it off over their mutual love of sailing and have been racing together since 1985.

    Ivester grew up in Charleston and has been sailing since the age of 12, enjoying considerable success in the Laser class. Schwenzfeier started sailing at the age of six and was once the Ohio national champion in Interlake class.

    Schwenzfeier names the other longtime sailors aboard Arrow along with their crew position and occupation. There’s Tom Weir (bowman and dentist), Sam Furr (starboard trimmer, architect), Cale Martin (mast, head of physics at Porter), Katherine Purcell (main, English teacher).

    “I have the best crew a skipper could possibly want,” Schwenzfeier said. “They’re all great people and outstanding sailors. We get along great and have been sailing the boat so long that very little needs to be said when doing maneuvers.”

    Schwenzfeier is both impressed and amazed that Charleston Race Week has grown into one of the largest regattas in the world, attracting almost 260 boats in 18 classes this year. He applauds event director Randy Draftz for his leadership in transforming the event into a civic treasure.

    “Randy has done a phenomenal job of shepherding this regatta. I can’t imagine anyone doing this any better than Randy,” he said. “What I love most about Sperry Charleston Race Week is that it has the right temperament. People come here to have fun and enjoy sailboat racing in its purest form. There is a great vibe about the regatta and everyone gets along great.”

    Arrow may be a 34-year-old boat, but it still performs extremely well, winning the last two races en route to a runner-up finish in ORC B class last year. Schwenzfeier is looking forward to the 25th anniversary of Sperry Charleston Race Week and plans on competing here for the foreseeable future.

    “I’m 74 years old, but I don’t know it,” said Schwenzfeier, who kindly donates his 25-foot Bertram for use as a race committee asset.

    “Willy Schwenzfeier is what Sperry Charleston Race Week is all about – just a real gentleman and a true Corinthian sailor,” said Draftz. “Willy has always been a tremendous supporter of this event and a great resource for information. We’re always looking for feedback from participants and he is very helpful in that regard.”


    * Public Service Announcement from a kid- by Lily Flack and friends on a J/70 that sailed in Charleston Race Week. Watch sailing video above for fun and games from the kids in Charleston

    Sailing is the most varied and diverse sport, offering something for everyone to enjoy. But for youth sailors, their involvement is often limited to age-based boats and competitions. While these provide tremendous experiences, if that is all they know, it isn’t enough to fully grasp the sport. Or worse, it doesn’t connect with them and they move on.

    Sixteen year old Lily Flack has a message for her age group, but first she has a story to share…

    "It was the final J/70 race on the last day of Charleston Race Week, and our youth team was on the last downwind leg. We all knew we were towards the front of the fleet, thinking we were maybe top 10 at best.

    We gybed out early around the windward mark to clear our breeze from the boats behind us, and while we were still in displacement mode, we saw some big pressure coming up from behind us. I took a look over my shoulder to see the puff was coming fast, prompting the call for Lucas Masciello, our floater, to get the jib out.

    I started to count down in my head. Once it got closer, I yelled 3… 2… 1… and had timed the puff perfectly. We were immediately up on a plane and our skipper Gannon Troutman called for weight back to keep the bow out of the water. Jack Solway, our bowman, ran to the back of the boat (while recording the whole thing) to keep us cruising along. Peter Cronin, our spinnaker trimmer, needed an extra hand on the sheet so I jumped on and helped him out.

    All of our eyes were locked on the speedometer to watch the numbers climb… 10 knots, 12 knots, 14 knots. At this point, we were all screaming and having such a blast that only one of us realized we had topped out at 16.5 knots in boat speed.

    None of us knew a J/70 could go that fast, until then. We later declared after watching the video below that explicit language is allowed over 15 knots of boat speed. Overall, we steadily improved our boat handling and tactical calls throughout the regatta to secure a 5th place finish in the last race of the event. We hope to see more kids join us on the race course for the next J/70 regatta!” Thanks for story from Scuttlebutt Sailing.com.


    * Speaking of kids, the J/34 IOR KNEE DEEP, sailed by a family in Cleveland, OH, is up to their usual fun and games. And, the kids are important participants on their family sailing team!  Enjoy their latest “pre-season” video from owner Brett Langolf


    * J/121 EAGLE tuning and testing on Long Island Sound- Steven Levy from New York said,
    "It was a remarkable afternoon. What the picture does not tell you, is that there was 12-13 knots of breeze just above the surface. With the 3 headsails triple-slotting, we were sailing at 8.8 to 9.5 knots on glass-like water, ideal for water skiing! Spectacular sailing!" Add to Flipboard Magazine.

    Read more...
  • J/Newsletter- April 10th, 2019 J/Sailing News

    The Sun Never Sets on J's Sailing Worldwide

    This past week saw an enormous diversity of sailing experiences around the world.  Starting in Central America, the 2019 J/24 North American Championship took place in Valle de Bravo, Mexico; the fleet of twenty-seven boats enjoyed amazing hospitality from Club Nautico Valle de Bravo and simply spectacular sailing conditions all four days of the event.

    Then, just to the east of them across the Gulf of Mexico, a brand new J/112E sailed the St Petersburg to Havana Race, a 300.0nm race from a start line off St Petersburg YC on Tampa Bay to a challenging finish line just off the Hemingway Marina in Havana, Cuba.  It blew like hell most of the race, from 15 kts up to 40 kt gusts at times. Theirs was an interesting report to read!  Then, across America to the west coast, St Francis YC hosted J/Fest San Francisco, with racing taking place on San Francisco Bay for one-design fleets of J/70s and J/105s.

    Over in the United Kingdom, we find the Warsash Sailing Club hosting their fourth weekend of sailing on Southampton Water and the infamous Solent for their HELLY HANSEN Warsash Spring Series; participating were fleets of IRC boats and one-design classes of J/70s, J/88s, J/109s; and a J/Sprit Class!

    Finally, yet another brand new J/112E had her sailing debut in Australia. Sailing the Sydney Offshore Series, which ran from the September 2018 to April 2019, the new boat with new crew enjoyed tremendous success Down Under.

    In the J/Community section below are two enjoyable stories to read from Sailing World from two notable writers- Gary Jobson and Dave Powlison.  First, the Women’s World Champion in J/22s and J/24s and summer resident of Newport/ Jamestown, Cory Sertl, has been named as US Sailing’s next President. Gary Jobson interviews her and provides his report. Second, J/35’s continue to provide vintage offshore one-design yacht racing for vintage crewmen. Read what David Powlison had to say about his recent experience sailing the 2018 J/35 North Americans in Michigan late last summer.
     

     
    J/99 Sailing Anarchy Report
    (San Francisco, CA)- Norman Davant from Sail California sent this report to SailingAnarchy.com from the first sail of the new J/99 offshore shorthanded speedster on the west coast.  Norm and crew took her for a spin on the infamous San Francisco Bay to give it a good test after the Pacific Sailboat Expo boat show in Richmond, CA.  Commented Norm,

    “We went thru several gyrations of everything, stretching and settling-in, and finally got the rig set up correctly. The headstay adjustment will be the key to the boat, keep the rig straight as the breeze comes up and then apply backstay.

    Jeff Thorpe and Peter Cameron set the rig up as we went up thru the range; it sure helped to have these two guys along. We think we have good numbers in the 14-18 knots range, we need to sail in a bit more wind to make sure the headstay and shrouds are correct, they are close for sure.

    We had six sailors on board. Amazingly, the J/99 is on “rails” up wind, totally balanced, beautiful touch on the helm.

    We did not have anyone hiking; I wanted to see what the stability was like.  The boat is really stiff; you can sail with two upwind in breeze for sure.

    As we were tuning, I did the old bear away trick to see if you can bear away with sails fully trimmed-in. No problem! There is no shortage of rudder size and control!

    Downwind, we had a few nice 18-knot puffs and we were cruising along at 12 kts boatspeed with all the control you would want. Was I surprised with the way the boat handled and sailed? Not at all.  Designer Al Johnstone nailed the design and the build was exactly as expected out of J/Composites in Europe.

    This boat will be a weapon for anyone that wants to go short-handed racing.”  Thanks for contribution from Norm Davant and SailingAnarchy.com
     

    SPERRY Charleston Race Week Preview
    (Charleston, SC)- It is that time of year again, the weekend before Easter/ Bank Holiday, when it seems just about half the East Coast heads down to Charleston Harbor to sail in the amazingly popular SPERRY Charleston Race Week.  It is not hard to see why over 115 J/Teams are headed down to the historically famous venue (Fort Sumter is where the American Civil War started) for a long three-day weekend of sailing on six courses spread around the huge harbor.  The Charleston Harbor Resort & Marina serves as host for the event and the CORA organization provides all logistical and professional race management for the 750+ sailors.  While the on-water racing is fun, fast & furious, it’s the après’ sailing social activities on the beach ashore with loads of rum, beer, southern food, and live music that keeps sailors coming back for more fun-loving memories in the Deep South.

    The regatta features six one-design J/Classes, including J/22s, J/24s, J/70s, J/80s, J/88s, and J/105s.  In addition, there are two “Pursuit-style” sailing divisions for both PHRF and ORC handicap rated boats that includes a J/30, J/35, J/109s, J/111s, J/120s and a J/122.

    Starting with the biggest fleet in the regatta, the fifty-seven J/70s will have their hands full negotiating the shoals and currents and wildly shifting breezes on 3/4 mile windward legs (max!).  Despite the challenges, for most J/70 sailors, it is like a big college regatta, but on keelboats. Looking forward to that experience are many top J/70 teams, like John & Molly Baxter’s VINEYARD VINES from Riverside, CT; Doug Strebel’s BLACK RIVER RACING from Dallas, TX; Joel Ronning’s CATAPULT from Wayzata YC in MN; John Heaton’s EMPEIRIA from Chicago YC; Trey Sheehan’s HOOLIGAN: FLAT STANLEY RACING from Edgewater YC in Cleveland, OH; Marty McKenna’s RARITY from Annapolis, MD; Henry Brauer’s RASCAL from Marblehead, MA; Peter Duncan’s RELATIVE OBSCURITY from American YC; and Brian Keane’s SAVASANA from Boston, MA.

    Top visiting teams from outside the USA include Tony Staples’ REDCOAT from Royal St Lawrence YC in Canada; Francisco Van Avermaete’s JUICY from YC Argentino in Buenos Aires, Argentina; Pedro Camargo’s MANCHA NEGRA from YC Rio de Janeiro in Brazil; Paul Wolman’s MENACE from Royal Hamilton Dinghy Club in Bermuda; and Vernon Robert’s MORENITA from Club de Yates Algarrobo in Chile.

    After sailing two midwinter regattas in St Petersburg, FL, the ten-boat J/88 class is looking forward to solid, warm winds, and hot competition.  It is a star-studded gathering of the top J/88s from Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, and the Northeast. The leading teams should include Iris Vogel’s DEVIATION from Huguenot YC in New Rochelle, NY; Andy & Sarah Graff’s EXILE from Chicago, IL; Laura Weyler’s HIJINKS from Youngstown YC in New York; Rob Ruhlman’s SPACEMAN SPIFF from Lakeside YC in Cleveland, OH; and Mike Bruno’s WINGS from American YC in Rye, NY. Anyone of those teams is capable of podium finishes and have all topped the leaderboard in major J/88 regattas in the past.

    There are six-boats sailing in the J/22 class, mostly comprised of “Warrior Sailing Teams” on four boats; the four skippers are Sammy Hodges, Jacob Raymond, Corey Hall, and Sammy Lugo. Joining them is Terence Young’s PUFF and the US Patriot Sailing Team on PATRIOT XXII.

    Of the dozen boats sailing in the J/24 class, eight are from the local fleet and four are “out of towners”.  It is those “foreigners” that represent a formidable challenge to local knowledge, such as Carter White’s YouREGATTA from Portland YC in ME and Mike Quaid’s ICE CUBE from Mallets Bay Boat Club in VT.

    The five-boat J/80 class may be dominated by a dynamic duo from Annapolis, MD. Those teams are Bert Carp’s ELEVEN from Annapolis YC and Bill & Shannon Lockwood’s SHENANIGANS from Eastport YC in Annapolis.

    It will be an all-South Carolina turn-out for the five-boat J/105 class. Amusingly enough, it also features an internecine rivalry amongst them; Frickie Martschink & Bill McKenzie on RUMFRONT versus Miles Martschink & Ben Hagood on SKIMMER. Making sure that family blood doesn’t boil over will be Joe Highsmith on DEAD ON ARRIVAL, Bob Scribner on JOYRIDE, and the trio of Matt Self, Russ Smith, & Paul Jacques on RUCKUS.

    It will be interesting to see how the ORC Hybrid Pursuit Division of fourteen boats turns out after three days of sailing. Half of the division is J/Teams.  Those boats include Andy Wescoat’s J/109 HARM’S WAY from Houston, TX; two J/111s (Rob Stein’s KINETIC from Charleston, SC and Ian Hill’s SITELLA from Hampton YC in VA); two J/120s (John Keenan’s ILLYRIA from Mt Pleasant, SC and Rick Moore’s MOOSE DOWN from Charleston, SC); Robin Team’s J/122 TEAMWORK from Lexington, NC; and Will Schwenzfeier’s J/35 ARROW from Charleston, SC.

    In the “traditional” PHRF Pursuit Division, there are five J/Teams.  Those fun-loving crews include the J/120 EMOCEAN (Bill Hanckel from Charleston YC); the J/120 ROCKET SCIENCE (Rick Oricchio from Mt Pleasant, SC); the J/130 SCEPTRE (Bob Musor from CORA in Mt Pleasant, SC); the J/30 LAS BRISAS (Mark Swatta from Mt Pleasant, SC); and the J/36 SOUL (the College of Charleston Sailing Team).

    The forecasts are for “breeze-on” for most of the regatta, starting Thursday practice day through the Sunday finale.  For more Charleston Race Week sailing information
     

    Les Voiles de St Barths X Edition Preview
    (Gustavia Harbor, St Barths)- The tenth edition of the Voiles de Saint Barth is about to start this coming weekend.  A fleet of fifty-five offshore racing thoroughbreds and a dozen cruising multihulls will be plying the spectacular aquamarine waters around St Barths for a week of fun in the sun and fabulous sailing from April 15th to 20th, 2019.  And, to be sure, the après’ sailing is simply outstanding and considered some of the best in the Caribbean.

    Les Voiles has been a bucket list event for sailors since its inception in 2010, and for its tenth edition, the sailors will enjoy five days of racing! Regatta Director François Tolède commented, “The extra day of racing last year proved very popular.  It brings more competitiveness and fun to the regatta, which we know is exactly what our participants are interested in! We look forward to the regatta kick off on Sunday and wrap up Saturday.  Racing is scheduled for Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. Still, the official “Day Off” is scheduled for Thursday and we hope to see everyone at Nikki Beach to celebrate!”

    Participating for at least the fourth year in a row are the two J/122s- LIQUID (Pamala Baldwin from Antigua) and EL OCASO (Chris Body from the United Kingdom). Joining them will be the J/105 SUNBELT REALTY JENK from Curacao, skippered by Jan Henk van der Wier.  For more Les Voiles de Saint Barth sailing information
     

     
    J/Fest Northwest Announcement
    (Seattle, WA)- Sail Northwest, the northwest USA J/Boat dealer, invites you to join them for the 2nd year of the comeback of the original J/FEST Northwest from June 22nd to 23rd, 2019.

    New this year! The Corinthian Yacht Club of Seattle will be taking over management of the Regatta!

    This is a two-day event that is open to all J/Boats owners and crew.  Starts will be provided for one-design, PHRF and cruising classes.

    The on-the-water activities are hosted by Sail Northwest and Corinthian Yacht Club of Seattle. Shoreside activities will be at the CYC Seattle Shilshole clubhouse Saturday and Sunday.

    Saturday evening’s dinner and door prize extravaganza is always a sellout. So head on down and join them for what Northwest Yachting Magazine called “the most looked forward to regatta of the year-” J/FEST NW.

    Initial one-design class commitments include the J/22s, J/24s, J/80s, J/97e, J/105s, and J/109s. And, the PHRF commitments include a J/122E, J/29, J/27, and J/30 and Cruising class commitments include a J/35c, J/37, J/40, and J/44. Come join the fun, every type of J/boat will be out sailing with us at the end of June!

    Please contact SAIL NW with any questions about the weekend’s festivities, sponsorship and racing questions- phone# 206-286-1004 or email- This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
     

    Regatta & Show Schedules:

    Mar 17- Apr 28- Warsash Spring Series- Warsash, England
    Apr 9-14- J/22 World Sailing Nations Cup- San Francisco, CA
    Apr 11-14- Charleston Race Week- Charleston, SC
    Apr 13-14- Irish J/24 Westerns- Lough Re, Ireland
    Apr 14-20- Les Voiles de Saint-Barth Regatta- Gustavia, St. Barth
    Apr 18-22- SPI Ouest France Regatta- La Trinite sur Mer, France
    Apr 20-21- J/22 Van Uden Ecco Regatta- Stellendam, Netherlands
    Apr 26-28- Newport to Ensenada Race- Newport Beach, CA
    Apr 27-28- American YC Spring Series- Rye, NY
    Apr 28- May 3- Antigua Sailing Week- English Harbour, Antigua
    May 3-5- Annapolis NOOD Regatta- Annapolis, MD
    May 3-5- Yachting Cup Regatta- San Diego, CA
    May 4-10- J/24 European Championship- Patras, Greece
    May 4- RORC Cervantes Cup Race- Cowes, England
    May 9-12- SAILING Champions League- Palma Mallorca, Spain
    May 10-12- Grand Prix de St Cast- St Cast, France
    May 10-12- RORC Vice Admiral’s Cup- Cowes, England

    For additional J/Regatta and Event dates in your region, please refer to the on-line J/Sailing Calendar.

     
    Welles Crowned J/24 North American Champion
    (Valle de Bravo, Mexico)- Who knew that the Mexican-hosted J/24 North American Championship would come down to two “gringos” from “el norte” that are “buenos amigos” from “el estado de Maine”. What? Yes! True story.

    Having known each other from way, way “Down East” for well over three decades, it was more than ironic that the two leading protagonists for the 2019 J/24 North American Championship both hailed from the state of Maine, and had sailed against each other in J/24s at various events ranging from Portland to further Downeast in Southwest Harbor off Mount Desert Island! That they found themselves battling “hammer & tong” for the 2019 J/24 N.A. finale was a bit of a “back to the future” experience for both Will Welles on BRUSCHETTA and Tony Parker on BANGOR PACKET. No one was going to “pull the wool over the eyes” of the other boat, they both know each other all too well!

    The 2019 J/24 North American Championship was hosted by Club Nautico Valle de Bravo on their gorgeous lake in Valle de Bravo, Mexico.  The twenty-seven boat fleet consisted of USA, French and Mexican teams from across the top fleets in the respective countries.

    In the end, it was Welles’ BRUSCHETTA that withstood a hard-charging Parker on his BANGOR PACKET to return the J/24 North American Championship to Newport, RI. Welles, two-time J/24 World Champion and now four-time J/24 North American Champion, came into Friday’s final two races with a slight two-point advantage over Parker. With Mexican boat owner Aroldo de Rienzo aboard, as well as Rich Bowen, John McCabe and PJ Schaffer, BRUSCHETTA took the victory in Race 9, with Parker still hot on their heels in second. The pair dueled in the final contest, with Welles placing ninth and Parker 10th, giving Welles and team the Championship with 24 points to Parker’s 28. In third place overall, and top Mexican finisher, was Kenneth Porter’s “S” with 32 points.

    Welles had never sailed in Valle de Bravo before this week, when he also competed in the Mexican National Championship (placing first overall). Although this marked the first time paired with local Valle de Bravo boat owner de Rienzo, the remaining crew are good friends from Newport, RI, who sometimes race together in the famous Newport Fleet 50 Thursday night races (considered the world’s “hottest” fleet since it has at least five J/24 World Champions sailing on some Thursdays!).

    Welles summarized the conditions in Valle de Bravo, saying, “It’s funky out there. The puffs don’t move quickly, so you have to get to them. That doesn’t happen in Newport or other places we have sailed.”

    As for strategy in the final two races, Welles said, “We focused on getting good starts, so we could go the way we thought we should.  The goal was to just keep Bangor Packet behind us!  Of course, we know them, and Tony is a great friend. Kudos to them for pushing us so hard!”

    Rounding out the top five were top Seattle, WA sailor Mark Laura with buddy Mark Thomas onboard, sailing BABA LOUIE to 4th place.  Fifth was another Mexican team, one of the early regatta leaders- Javier Velásquez’s TRINQUETE.  For more J/24 North American Championship sailing information
     

     
    J/112E SILVER SURFER Wins St Petersburg to Havana Race
    (Havana, Cuba)- “The forecast looked good for this year’s 89-year old race from St Pete YC to Havana (Marina Hemingway). In fact, it was so good that the 25-30 knot NNE breeze would be too much for the leeward shore Gulfstream finish line in Havana, so the start was delayed a day.”  So said, Harvey Ford and Tom Mistele, the co-owners of the new J/112E SILVER SURFER.  Both went on to describe their somewhat demanding experience in moderate to very high winds (40 kts plus) over the course of their race in their newly launched boat.  Here is their story:

    “At 9:00 AM the next day, on March 19, twenty-seven boats started on a reach off downtown St. Pete in a still sporty 25 knot NNE breeze.

    So back up a minute...the race was the first of its kind in 1930, running for 29 years until suspended due to events in Cuba. Then, 58 years later, it resumed in 2017. This year was the third edition of the new race. Unchanged since 1930, the race is a 20-mile dog leg out of Tampa Bay under the Skyway Bridge, with a sharp left-turn just outside the Bay at Southwest Pass sea buoy #1, then at ~182 degs and 200 miles to Rebecca Shoals (east of Dry Tortugas island at the end of the Florida Keys), then about the same heading another 80 miles to Cuba.

    This year, our J/112E SILVER SURFER took first overall, much to our pleasant surprise! Who knew! The crew was Chris Bergstrom, Marty Kullman, Lin Robson, John Monahan and Christian Koules.

    Finishing second was Wasabi (a fast, well-sailed Farr 395 also from St. Pete), and third went to Fresh Pineapple (a hard-charging Esse 990 from New Orleans). All 3 boats set a new course record, with line honors to Pineapple (32h:43 m) and Wasabi (34h:5m), but neither saved their time on SILVER SURFER that finished in 35h:27m.

    At the downwind start, conditions were about 25 knots and gusting higher. SILVER SURFER, appropriately painted silver/gray and named after Tom Mistele’s Marvel comic hero, set its A2 spin and jumped on the wake of the larger Wasabi, together chasing Pineapple out of the Bay. However, Pineapple was soon raked by some really big gusts and got the dust washed off its spreaders in a prolonged knockdown (e.g. a massive massive broach!). Wasabi similarly rolled out, so Surfer lost its wake ride, but we surfed on. Surfer took several knockdowns itself, losing its MOB buoy in the process (as did Wasabi), leading to calls to the RC to advise that all was OK. For sure, we were successfully testing the maximum limits of the 650 fabric of our brand new North spinnaker!

    We were the first boat to the dog leg inside the Skyway Bridge and then set our A3 chute in the building breeze. Recording 29-33 knot gusts, we managed to carefully jibe about 5 times in the dash out SW Pass maintaining 10+ knots for the first 2 hours and maxing at 14.5 knots.

    After the final jibe at SW #1, Surfer and the others set into a 200-mile port tack reach in the 25-knot breeze...with the true wind angle at about 140 degs off the bow and apparent wind at about 100 degrees. With a deep keel, one reef in the main and the A3 spinnaker, we were able to maintain a higher COG inside the rhumbline, while still surfing off every other wave...eventually posting a top speed of 15.7 knots.

    Pineapple scooted out ahead, but stayed in sight all day on a lower heading. Wasabi eased further offshore outside the rhumbline and eventually caught us at Rebecca Shoals, out of view to leeward.

    Anticipating even higher winds (35-40 knots) and a slight tilt to the east for the breeze on the first night, according to pre-race weather reports, we elected to drop the chute before full-on darkness.  But, that was done only after hot lasagna and Hawaiian Rolls served “comfortably” to the whole crew. The next 9 hrs were still fast under full main and jib and a totally obscured full moon.  But, the really bad winds never happened, so we settled for good control, a high course, and 10-12 knots of boat speed all night.

    Wasabi was going to catch us eventually, but owed us 99 minutes on corrected handicap time. In the conditions we were sailing, that meant they had to beat us by about 15 miles, so we felt relatively safe.

    On Wednesday morning, the winds dropped down to a civilized 21.0 knots. Feeling quite comfortable, we served coffee and breakfast bars and then we re-set the A2! Tracking the location and strength of the Gulf Stream, we jibed back and forth across the rhumbline to attempt a clean arrival at Havana over the final 80 miles.

    As we approached the Havana Hemingway Harbor finish line, the 10-foot onshore rollers triggered by the NE breeze and the opposing east flowing Gulf Stream of 4-5 kts would make the after-dark finish somewhat challenging, to say the least!

    The finish mark, being a 10 sec flashing white light with the city behind it, is an annual riddle. The buoy bobs in 300 feet of water (up from about 2,000 feet deep less than a 1/2 mile offshore) and the conditions were too rough for the RC to stay on post. So, we all took our own times at the finish buoy per the Sailing Instructions. The reef along the shore is just 1/4 mile downwind from the finish, so we definitely had one foot on the brake as we approached! Conservative as we were, we even doused the chute well before the finish! This hair-raising finish made the smooth Cuban customs process seem like a walk in the park!

    Our hats off to the designers and builders of the sturdy J/112E! Despite the “dancing on a piano-wire/ walking the tight-rope” sailing conditions, our only real challenge was the A-sail tack line chafe that we doubled up underway before it parted. We regularly blessed the over-sized rudder and carbon wheel and, needing front-end buoyancy, we were happy that we had stored the extra water, life raft, anchor, and other stuff in the aft lockers.

    As you would expect, a glorious hour of celebration occurred at the dock after clearing customs! All seven of us went below, turned on the AC, had some drinks, ate the full dinner that we had been envisioning all race long, and asked each other what just happened! What an amazing time and great way to celebrate our first win on Silver Surfer!”   For more information regards the fast, powerful J/112E sport cruiser
     

     
    Successful J/112E Debut in Sydney Offshore Series
    (Sydney, Australia)- In its first full race series since arriving in Australia, the stunning new J/112E ZEST finished an impressive 2nd overall in the Sydney Amateurs Sailing Club “Cruiser Racer series”. The full sixteen race series was held on stunning Sydney Harbour.

    Starting in September 2018 and finishing in mid-April 2019, the competitive fleet raced in a wide variety of wind and sea state conditions. From light drifters to 30 knots plus “blowing dogs off chains” kind of weather, the new J/112E handled everything in her stride, with an impressive score line of four 1sts, a 2nd, three 3rds, and a 4th.

    “I was on a very steep learning curve,” commented ZEST’s proud owner Stephen. “A new crew, new sailing club, new courses and a very special new boat; we are still learning a lot about it! Progressively, through the season, we learnt what the boat was capable of doing in all conditions.  We especially enjoyed sailing upwind, with her better pointing and better VMG speed capabilities than our competitors! A special thanks to my crew and our competitor’s, we look forward to racing against you all again next season!”  For more information regards the exciting, powerful J/112E sport cruiser
     

    Tight Battles @ J/Fest San Francisco
    (San Francisco, CA)- The annual J/Fest San Francisco, hosted by St Francis Yacht Club, provided yet again excellent race management and close racing for the fleet of one-designs that included J/105s and J/70s. Over the two-day weekend, the fleet was able to get in three races per day for a total of six overall.

    In the twenty-five boat J/105 division, the top of the leaderboard saw nip-and-tuck battles that raged race-by-race.  The key was consistency and, other than the regatta winner, all teams posted at least one or more double-digit finishes; that is how tight the racing can be in the J/105 Fleet #1 on San Francisco Bay.

    It was rough going for everyone, as evidenced by the scorelines.  Nevertheless, it was Tim Russell’s NE*NE, with an 8-1-1-9-5-3 tally for 27 pts, that took the class honors.  Leading the regatta after four races was Ryan Simmons’ BLACKHAWK, but a bruising 5th race dropped them out of contention, scoring a 2-2-10-3-13-2 for 32 pts to take the silver.  Taking the bronze on the podium was Adam Spiegel’s JAM SESSION with a 3-8-5-10-10-7 scoreline for 43 pts.  The balance of the top five was Justin Oberbauer’s STRANGELOVE with 44 pts in fourth and Phil Laby’s GODOT with 53 pts in fifth (breaking a tie-breaker with Jeff Litfin’s MOJO that ended up 6th).

    The J/70s saw two boats duel for the class lead on the first day.  However, on day two, it was Chris Kostanecki’s JENNIFER that firmly took the upper hand to win the regatta with a 2-4-1-1-1-3 record for 12 pts.  While giving them a run-for-the-money on day one, Scott Sellers/ Harrison Turner’s 1FA ultimately had to settle for the silver with a 3-3-4-2-5-1 tally for 18 pts. After starting off with a blistering 1-1-5 to lead the regatta on the first day, Brian Mullen’s ORANGE YOU GLAD lost their “mojo” on day two, posting a mediocre 5-7-9 to close the series with 28 pts and settling for the bronze on the podium.  For more J/Fest San Francisco sailing information
     

     
    Warsash Spring Series- Weekend IV Report
    (Warsash, England)- The fourth weekend is now on the books for the Warsash Sailing Club’s famous HELLY HANSEN Warsash Spring Series. The fleet was blessed, again, with good enough conditions to get in one more race for the IRC handicap fleets and three more for the J/70s.

    Race Report- Black Group
    IRC 4 Class was started off Meon Shore on time at 1000 hrs from the White Group line in a very light easterly breeze. As on the previous Sunday, the main Black Group start was set up near QXI International buoy on the south edge of the East Knoll bank.

    With the forecast of 6-8 knots starting off in the ENE and swinging to the SE during the racing period, but then dying away to nothing by late afternoon, the race team was considering the difficult question of timing the moving orientation for course setting when the breeze died away almost completely. With more hope than expectation about any return of a sailing breeze, a postponement was announced and the boats and the race team sat and waited.

    Happily by about 1030 hrs a light breeze of 4-5 knots arrived from the SE and with suitable courses quickly set, the start sequence got all classes away between 1050 and 1110 on a series of beats, runs and reaches between the Ryde Middle bank and the East Knoll area, with courses of 8-10 miles. Light sunshine and the gentle breeze made for enjoyable racing and testing tactics over the spring tide.

    In IRC 1 Class, it was the first outing for Chris Jones & Louise Makin’s J/111 JOURNEYMAKER II, showing they had not lost their edge by winning their class in convincing fashion.

    In IRC 2 Class, Simon Perry’s J/109 JIRAFFE had a disappointing 9th place on Sunday which she’ll hope to discard when enough races have taken place next Sunday; but even so she held onto second place overall. Sitting in third continues to be Chris Burleigh’s JYBE TALKIN.  It was good to see Royal Yachting Association Chairman Christopher Preston out racing with the J/109 JUBILEE, his crew included Cowes Week regatta director Laurence Mead; they scored a creditable 5th place in this 21-strong class. In addition, Charles Ivill’s J/112E DAVANTI TYRES team is beginning to get themselves up to speed in the series, posting a 1-3 in their last two races to be sitting in 5th overall, easily within striking distance of the podium.  Everyone was also glad to see the new J/99 JENGA 99 competing for the first time, raced by Mark Richmond and his team and finishing a few seconds behind the J/109 JUBILEE.

    With four races under their collective belts in the J/88 Class, Gavin Howe’s TIGRIS continues to dominate with all bullets for 4 pts. However, the top five has jumbled a bit since a few boats had “no show DNC’s” posted in their scorelines.  Currently, sitting in second is Dianne & Dirk Van Beek’s SABRIEL JR with 31 pts, third is Richard Cooper’s JONGLEUR with 33 pts, fourth is Kirsty & David Apthorp’s J-DREAM with 36 pts, and fifth is Tim Tolcher’s RAGING BULL with 38 pts.

    The J/109s also have four races on the books.  Winning the fourth race quite handily was John Smart’s JUKEBOX, an amazing performance for their first day on the water this season!  Meanwhile, Simon Perry’s JIRAFFE continues to lead with 7 pts.  They are followed by Chris Burleigh’s JYBE TALKIN in second with 12 pts, third is Rob Cotterill’s MOJO RISIN with 33 pts.  The balance of the top five is Bill Stock’s JENGU in 4th and Chris Preston’s JUBILEE in 5th position.

    The J-sprit class continues to be dominated by the J/88s and by Gavin Howe’s TIGRIS, in particular, as she took her fourth win in four weekends! The next two spots have flip-flopped.  Sitting in 2nd is now Dirk & Dianne Van Beek’s J/88 SABRIEL JR with 31 pts, following in 3rd by Kirsty & David Apthorp’s J/88 J-DREAM with 33 pts. This class will see a significant shake-up on the leaderboard once the toss race comes into effect after race six, as several teams have “no show 25’s” counting in their scorelines.

    Race Report- White Group
    The forecast for the day was not exciting, E to SE, 4-7 knots. This eventually turned out to ENE to S and the back to ESE, with 3-5 knots for most of the day and reaching nearly 8 knots for the last half of the last race of the day.

    IRC 4, as is normal, got away on time at 1000 hrs for their round-the-Solent cans course, but the swing to the right started immediately, and the start of the combined sportsboat fleet was postponed. After an hour, during which the wind went right round to S before settling at SSE, the fleet finally got away. In the second race, it was a relatively stable breeze.  Then, for the third race the wind was back to its old tricks, which needed the course shifted left before the start, and 25 degrees further left during the race. The ongoing shift shook things up somewhat on the race track.

    The hotly contested fleet of J/70s have now sailed twelve races. Continuing to lead the class is Paul Ward’s EAT SLEEP J REPEAT with mostly 1sts and 2nds for 15 pts net. Jumping up to second place is Phil Chandler’s BLACKJAX with 50 pts net. Dropping into third place was Graham Clapp’s JEEPSTER with 66 pts. The rest of the top five includes Terry O’Neill’s AQUA J in 4th and Doug Struth’s DSP in 5th place.   Sailing photo credits- Andrew Adams/ CloseHauled Photography    Follow the Warsash Spring Series on Facebook here   For more HELLY HANSEN Warsash Spring Series sailing information
     

    J/Community
    What friends, alumni, and crew of J/Boats are doing worldwide
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    * Tony Mack’s J/122 McFLY/ EL OCASO took second in their division at the recent BVI Spring Regatta. Tony also remarked on the BVI Spring Sailing Festival events that took place before the regatta, commenting that “Pamala Baldwin’s J/122 LIQUID won the very popular Round Tortola Race and our J/122 won the fun-loving Scrub Island Race. We thought you might enjoy some photos from those events and the team celebrating their good fortune with some nice silverware!”

    * J/35 Vintage Yacht Racing with Vintage J/35 Classmen!?
    Three decades and many owners later, these utilitarian 35-Footers remain true to their calling. Sailing World’s David Powlison provides us a unique insight into the popular offshore class.

    “It’s been more than three decades since I last set foot on a J/35, but walking down the docks at the County Marina in Cheboygan, Michigan, I’m feeling, as Yogi Berra once famously said, “déjà vu all over again.” Among the marina’s slips are 13 survivors of the one-design ­sportboat invasion: battle-worn J/35s and their owners gathered 15 miles southeast of Mackinac Island for the class’s 2018 North American Championship.

    There’s no mistaking the J/35 with its big overlapping genoa and a weather rail stacked with crew, just as designer Rod Johnstone intended it to be. Yes, a number of the boats have bits of modern gear; carbon tillers and spinnaker poles, new instrumentation, laminate sails and modern lines. It all seems cosmetic. With boats, especially, age is impossible to mask. The copious hardware mounted about the deck, the beefy rod rigging, the unmistakable profile— the J/35 is, without a doubt, a product of the 1980s.

    As I study which halyards lead to where, it’s obvious this championship will require me to tap a skill set from years past.

    With the symmetric spinnaker, there are sheets and guys and their lazy counterparts— a far cry from the simplicity of the modern asymmetric. Gigantic overlapping headsails take a lot longer to grind home after a tack than the non-overlapping jibs used on newer boats. Then, there’s the task of choreographing 10 people every time something happens. A consistent crew is prized among owners, especially when racing on the championship’s short, labor-intensive, windward-leeward courses.

    I’ve been invited to join Greg Whipple, from Grand Blanc, Michigan, and his crew aboard Whiplash. Whipple races in the Detroit area, and the crew delivered the boat north as part of the Port Huron to Mackinac Race two weeks earlier, which is the case for other teams from Detroit. The Chicago-area fleet used the Chicago to Mackinac Race as its feeder to Cheboygan.

    Whipple has been in the class for a long time; but for this event, most of his crew are new to the boat. He walks us through maneuvers as we motor out of the harbor for the first race of the series. Once sails are up, with the wind spiking into the upper teens, much of our pre-race time is consumed by a sail change from the No. 2 jib down to the No. 3. It’s a reminder of how long a sail change takes, even with a rail full of helping hands.

    Thirteen J/35s on the ­starting line of the 2018 North ­American Championship at North Star Sail Club is a testament to the strength of the class, its devotees and the timeless nature of the design.

    Once racing, we get a good start and hold our own, upwind, before the fun begins.

    Across the fleet, foredeck crews are assimilating to an old-world order at the pointy end. Most newer crews survive the heavy-air spinnaker sets, but there’s plenty of chaotic jibing, shrimping and ­spinnakers flagging aloft.

    “Having the same crew is a big deal,” says Bill Wildner, whose boat, Mr. Bill’s Wild Ride, is always the one to beat. If there were a reward for having the most seasoned crew, he would’ve won that too. His youngest, newest crewmember joined the squad 14 years ago. The crew’s age range goes from Mike Zanella, 67, to Eric Weston, who joined the team 26 years ago, when he was 16.

    “I’m very fortunate I’ve had the same guys stick with me— and it’s not just for sailing,” Wildner says. “ We have a blast the rest of the time as well.”

    The wind moderates the second day and eventually fades to a whimper on the third and final day. The Whiplash crew, and most of those on other boats that struggled the first day, hit their stride, and crew work dramatically improves. The race committee delivers nine races over three days, which amounts to 18 spinnaker sets and drops. That’s enough to make veterans of any crew in one weekend.

    As with any grassroots regatta, the overarching social experience transcends the racing itself. The Whiplash crew meets regularly for breakfast at Alice’s Restaurant, a great dive with a menu a mile long. Coincidentally, Cheboygan, a city with fewer than 5,000 full-time residents, is hosting a music festival the same weekend as the regatta. Bands play from early afternoon and well into the evening, and for the thirsty sailors, there’s the Cheboygan Brewing Co., which has been serving suds since 1882.

    The biggest draw to this year’s championship, however, is the omnipresence of designer Rod Johnstone. At 81, Johnstone still sails his own J/35 in Maine. He might not be as quick on his feet as he once was, but his stories and enthusiastic wit make him the star of the show.

    Dean Fitzpatrick, the mastermind behind the North American Championship, remembers calling Johnstone’s house one Thanksgiving morning. “His wife answered and said she was making dinner for him and their kids,” Fitzpatrick says. “But, she put him on the phone anyway, and when I told him about the event and that we hoped he’d attend, he said, without hesitation, ‘I’ll do it!’”

    He didn’t just show up to shake hands though. For the final day of racing, he jumped aboard Sheri Dufresne’s Firefly. “It was amazing,” she says. “He was so giving of his time. We even had him sign the boom.”

    Afterward, Johnstone stopped by every boat to chat with owners and sign his name on the interior. The entire Blackhawk crew signed a hat for Johnstone that he wore for the rest of the event. He spent a lot of time with us aboard Whiplash.

    “That was so cool having Rod stop by to talk with us,” Whipple says. “For most of us, it’s likely his visit will be remembered long after the event itself fades.”

    Pulling off an event of this caliber, let alone drawing a fleet of this size, is a feat. Even with 13 boats, the J/35 class championship is the envy of many 30‑plus‑year-old one-designs.

    The venue had its challenges too: There’s no yacht club, and it’s being held in early August, earlier than the traditional September date. And, with the Mackinac races serving as feeders, it’s part of a two-for-one event. North Star Sail Club, located down lake in the Detroit area, hosts the event “off-campus,” so to speak, and shuttles race-committee gear, boats and personnel north to make the event successful.

    Fitzpatrick no longer sails competitively, but still maintains an unparalleled passion for the J/35, its people and its class association. He regularly corresponds by email with 172 people, which includes 45 J/35 owners from: Chicago; Milwaukee; Duluth, Minnesota; Ohio; New York; Annapolis, Maryland; and Toronto. Despite the mountain of work he puts into this event, he deflects all praise with humility. “I just make the calls,” he says. But he does ­acknowledge, “Nothing ever just happens.”

    When the J/35 was conceived in the early 1980s, there was no real consideration of the measurement rules of the time. Johnstone had another idea in mind. “As with all of our boats, we worked to create a one-design racer, but it just happened to rate well under IMS,” Johnstone says. Yet, one of the first J/35s ever built won its ­division in the 1984 Bermuda Race.

    The J/35 is an offshoot of the J/36, which debuted in 1980. The J/36 came fully loaded, with a complete interior, wheel steering, etc., and the $84,000 price reflected that. “Then the recession hit in 1982,” Johnstone says. “We couldn’t sell any more 36s. And the big thing was the number of hours we were spending on the J/36 to fit all the options. The J/35 was easy. We made everything optional except for the diesel engine and four bunks below.”

    J/Boats sold the base boat for $49,500 back then, and when the first boats were delivered in 1983, it was clear they had a winner. The boat rolled up a string of victories beyond the ’84 Bermuda Race, including Mackinac Races, the Monhegan Race and Miami to Montego Bay. American Tony Lush raced one in the 1984 OSTAR, a singlehanded transatlantic race. It carries a PHRF rating of around 72 in most PHRF fleets.

    By 1988, J/35s were getting more expensive to build, Johnstone says: “With the 35, we ended up competing with ourselves in the used-boat business. This happened with the J/24 and J/30 as well. When you get to a certain point where a new boat costs twice as much as a used one, it’s hard to sell new boats.”

    Once production ceased in 1992, 330 J/35s had been built.

    Yes, there are challenges to owning a 1980’s-vintage fiberglass craft. The hull is balsa-cored, so buyers beware: a moisture meter is a sound investment.

    “If you can find one that’s not all wet, you’ve done well,” says Wildner, who recently stripped the skin off his rudder, dried it out and rebuilt it. “I was tired of fighting the blisters,” he admits.

    Blackhawk had its stern replaced as a condition of purchase before Amie and Tim Ross bought it. It had fallen victim to a bungled DIY repair involving particleboard that attempted to deal with high moisture content. The boats can be refurbished without too much time and money, however, and parts are readily available, either with a direct replacement or its modern equivalent.

    While many sailing thoroughbreds of a similar vintage have been put out to pasture, converted to cruising boats or left to decay in their slips, the class has persevered, with centers of activity in Chicago, Detroit and Annapolis. Any time I ask a J/35 owner, “Why this boat?” I hear the same answer as I would for any other older design with a devoted following. The appeal is the level of competition, the presence of like boats in their area and the lower cost of getting into one.

    Yet, there are intangible reasons that link those who sail it with Johnstone’s creation. Amie and Tim’s relationship is founded in their love of the 35.

    They met on match.com, Amie says. She had posted a picture of herself on a boat she was racing, and he had posted one of himself with a car.

    “He saw my picture and wrote, ‘Nice boat.’ I responded with, ‘Nice car!’”

    Tim had never sailed before. Amie talked him into trying it out, and in short order, they were sailing together in a Mackinac race. During the race, the owner’s son got sick, and they had to retire. “While we were ashore, Tim told me that this race was going to cost us a lot of money,” Amie recalls

    “He said, ‘We’re going to have to buy our own boat so we can finish the race.’” That boat ended up being a J/35. Besides a few local races, they’ve since completed a pair of Port Huron to Mackinac races.

    There’s also Ron Rabine, a barrel-chested man with rosy cheeks and a big smile buried in a thick gray beard. “He would often sail with us,” Amie says. “He even let us braid his beard. One time, he was flying the kite, and one of the other crewmembers suggested he move to get his weight in a better place, and he said, ‘When I’m flying the kite, I don’t weigh anything.’ So we started calling him our deck fairy.”

    Rabine’s connection to the J/35 came while running some races at a J/35 championship out of Cheboygan back in 2002.

    “I had heard a bunch of love songs on the radio on the way up and bought a ring at the local Kmart that used to be just down the road from here,” he says. The race committee boat he was assigned to had a Gaelic name that translates to “love of my life.” The coincidence was too great to ignore, so he proposed to his wife, Terry, just as the fleet rounded the weather mark.

    She said "yes", of course.

    The appeal is the level of competition, the presence of like boats in their area and the lower cost of getting into one.

    Distracted, he pooched the starting sequence for the next race. “I was off by a minute,” he says. “But I stopped the sequence, admitted the mistake over the radio and also said, ‘I just proposed to Terry.’”

    The entire fleet broke out in applause. The following year, he picked up a ­permanent spot with Mr. Bill’s Wild Ride. He’s been a fixture ever since.

    Ken Schwandt operates Kent Sail Co., a three-person sailmaking business. His father, Kent, got him involved in the family business when he was 11, sweeping floors and keeping the loft tidy. They built mostly cruising sails, but got involved in the now-defunct MORC class with a Lindenberg 26. In 1988, the elder Schwandt bought a J/35. Son Ken now makes class-legal sails, including wardrobes for three teams at the North Americans — including Wildner’s.

    The Schwandt family tradition continues with his son. “When he was young I tried to put him in junior sailing,” Schwandt says. “But he said he’d rather skateboard. He’s 30 now, and he came back and said, ‘Hey, can I go sailing with you?’”

    He’s now a regular with Mr. Bill’s Wild Ride, and so long as Wildner keeps winning, he’ll have no problem keeping the consistent crew required to win. It’s a code of competitive sailing: Good teams keep good crew.

    When Wildner bought the boat 26 years ago, he thought he’d have the boat for five years at most. “I’ve sailed a lot of different boats when they first came out — J/105s, J/120s — thinking I’d make a move, but I like the way the J/35 sails,” he says. “It’s a better sailing boat and a great platform to race.”
    Sailing photo credits- Sailing World/ Santo Fabio and article credits- Sailing World/ David Powlison

    * Cory Sertl- J/22 and J/24 Women’s World Champion- is now US Sailing President!

    Gary Jobson recently provided a profile on Sailing World.com regarding the recent election of Newport/ Jamestown native and top woman sailor- Cory Sertl. Here is Gary’s report on a woman sailor he has also known for nearly two-plus decades as a friend, competitor, and fellow US Sailing volunteer.

    “The new leader of American sailing is a champion and a proven leader, but the sport is changing faster than any organization could possibly keep apace.

    From Cory Sertl’s ­perspective at the President’s helm of US Sailing, and as a member of the World Sailing Council, she sees similar challenges across the American sailing landscape as she does elsewhere in the world: participation is stagnant in many regions. At home, the United States won only one medal in the past two summer Olympic Games, and there’s considerable confusion on what is the best handicap-rating rule. Sertl has the high-level racing experience and longtime board service to draw upon as she takes on these and other challenges, but she faces stiff headwinds on her first beat.

    Sertl, 59, has transitioned over the years from an Olympian and champion sailor to a leader at the highest levels of the sport. She was selected Rolex Yachtswoman of the Year twice (1995 and 2001), is a winning skipper and crew, and regularly races with her family. But, today, she’s committed full time to advancing the sport that has defined her life. She recently reminded me of a story when, in 1990, immediately after she and Jody Swanson won a gold medal in the International 470 class at the Goodwill Games in Seattle, I took them aside and said, “OK, you have just won a gold medal, so now you have to give back to the sport. You really have to be role models here.”

    Sertl took my advice to heart and has since become connected to the sport, from the bottom up. Leading US Sailing while simultaneously serving on the World Sailing’s Board today gives her a unique vantage point to the inner workings of our sport.

    “It’s been fun to continue at a high level in sailing, not just competing, but also making decisions about what’s good for the sport,” she says. “Sixty years ago, we didn’t have many women sailing at as high a level as men. There has been a women’s class in the Olympics since 1988 and now we have more opportunities. I’m glad to see World Sailing working to achieve gender equity by the number of competitors and medals starting in 2024. It’s really exciting.”

    US Sailing’s Presidential term limit, however, is only three years, which is a short amount of time to implement initiatives, but her priorities include improving the U.S. Olympic sailing program, building a better education system and getting more new people to the water. The organization recently published its strategic plan for 2018 to 2020 and one of its goals is to encourage more people to get out on the water throughout their lifetime. The plan is to offer a variety of sailing activities.

    To understand sailors’ needs, US Sailing will use technology and data analysis, focused communication and customer service. Each department will address specific ways to achieve these goals.

    “We put all new projects and ideas through this filter to understand what will work,” Sertl says. “For example, if someone leaves the sport for several years, we must help them re-engage with sailing. We can do this with colleges, community sailing, yacht clubs and other sailing organizations. It could be something simple like getting five friends together to go sailing on a J/24. An important part of the plan is to measure progress by observing participation trends at events or training programs, US Sailing membership and results at regattas. These activities will include casual recreational sailing to high-­performance competition.

    “At the World Sailing Annual Conference in Singapore last year we talked about how to keep kids in the sport,” she adds. “Sometimes young girls don’t like sailing by themselves in the Optimists. We want to keep them excited and we worked on ways to accomplish that task.”

    US Sailing’s Board has its own set of priorities. But, at the international level, the process of governing a rich and increasingly diverse sport is considerably more complicated today. Sertl says she’s learned to listen and understand different people’s points of view and has become more effective as a result.

    “It takes a while to gain respect and trust, so, when we speak, people listened,” she says. “Common sense is important when finding solutions.”

    Sertl started down the sailing path in Jamestown, Rhode Island.  Her family had a summerhouse on the small island west of Newport when her father served in the Navy.  “We learned to sail right in front of the house,” she recalls with fond memories.

    US Sailing’s presidential term limit, however, is only three years, which is a short amount of time to implement initiatives, but her priorities include improving the U.S. Olympic sailing program, building a better education system and getting more new people to the water.

    She attended the University of Pennsylvania and raced on the sailing team for four years. Upon graduation, she campaigned an International 470, crewing for Susan Dierdorff Taylor. They won the World Championship in Brazil in 1988, and with her commanding height, she says, she was best-suited for the crew position.

    The pair later lost Olympic selection to Alison Jolly and Lynn Jewell by a narrow margin. Sertl, however, was named to the Olympic Team in Pusan, South Korea, as an alternate. Jolly and Jewell went on to win a gold medal that year, the first female sailors to achieve such an honor.

    “Crewing in a 470 is awesome, because when you’re on the trapeze you get to see a lot,” Sertl says. “You really get to control the tactics. I enjoyed getting into that role because I had done so much skippering. I felt like a true 50/50 partner. We helped push Alison and Lynn toward winning the gold medal. It’s fun to be part of the whole team, and experience the Olympic movement.”

    In 1995, panelists selected Sertl as Rolex Yachtswoman of the Year, citing her versatility in both fleet and match racing that year as both a skipper and a crew. Sertl and her teammates, Dina Kowalyshyn, Susan Taylor and Pease Glaser won the Rolex International Women’s Keelboat Championship sailed in a matched fleet of J/24s, the pinnacle of women’s fleet racing at the time. The team won four of 10 races against 60 teams. The winning skipper of the championship was awarded a Rolex watch, and because Sertl, Glaser and Taylor had already had won Rolex watches in the past, Sertl made a grand gesture by giving hers to Kowalyshyn.

    In 2011, Sertl was back into the action at the Rolex International Keelboat Championship with a new team sailing on J/22s, all from her home club. The regatta was held at Rochester YC, so she was right at home.

    There were 36 teams from 16 countries racing, and entering the final day of racing, she trailed 2008 Olympic gold medalist, Anna Tunnicliffe and Olympian Sally Barkow. Three races were sailed in thunderstorms and unsettled conditions and Sertl won the regatta, beating Tunnicliffe by 5 points.

    Sertl, her husband, Mark and their two grown children, Katja and Nick, continue to race Lightnings, but they usually race on separate boats because the Lightning requires three crew. Plus, they are often seen sailing their J/22 in the Conanicut YC’s famous Tuesday Night Series in the summertime.

    The Sertl family spends winter months in Rochester, New York, where they own a real-estate development and management company, and try to spend a good part of the summer in Rhode Island. Sertl recently teamed up with Hannah Swett, Melissa Purdy Feagin, Joan Porter and Jody Stark to compete in the 2018 J/70 World Championship. In the next few years, she plans to race in the New York YC’s IC37 fleet, to continue to racing in the Lightning class, and to race a J/22 in the local circuit.

    One of her roles at World Sailing is serving as chair of the Youth World Championship committee. Teaching young sailors to make sailing a lifelong sport is an essential part of Sertl’s work both in the United States and around the world.

    “We try to provide great resources for youth sailing and make it more understandable and easier to get into the sport, and easier to stay in it,” she says. “We want to promote all kinds of different sailing, not just at the top level.”

    Sertl is a certified sailing instructor and travels often to work directly with ­community sailing programs.

    “I am passionate about getting young people involved in the sport at all levels,” she says. “At US Sailing we have the opportunity to strengthen support for the sport at all levels, continuing to strive for excellence and creating quality programs. Partnering with the many organizations that support development is key to sustaining a solid base and inspiring ­lifelong sailors.”

    Young people who get involved in sailing are busy learning life skills and contributing in positive ways to their communities, she adds, noting that lasting friendships develop through the sport whether it is racing and learning the elements of sportsmanship or becoming a sailing instructor and having a summer job teaching sailing.
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  • J/Newsletter- April 3rd, 2019 J/Sailing News

    The Sun Never Sets on J's Sailing Worldwide

    This past week presented the sailing world with a variety of options for their sailing passions.  For starters, out west in California, the San Francisco-based Bay Area Multihull Association (BAMA) hosted their annual Doublehanded Farallones Race.  The race is notorious for never delivering what the most sophisticated weather prognosticators forecast, such has been the case for winds inside San Francisco Bay versus what is seen “outside” past the infamous “Potato Patch”; it is a 58.0nm race from the Golden Gate YC start line (remember the America’s Cup on 75 foot cats?), out around the Farallones Rocks to port, and return. This year’s race featured a “first ever” J/120 one-design class!

    South of those sailors doing the thrash around the Farallones Islands, the J/24s are enjoying nearly flawless (like never seen) sailing conditions in Valle de Bravo for their J/24 North American Championship, hosted by one of the most accommodating sailing clubs on the Planet Earth- the Club Nautico Valle de Bravo in Mexico. They have two days to go, follow the action below.

    Meanwhile, off to the east in the Caribbean, their was another amazing host team for the British Virgin Islands Spring Regatta, the Nanny Cay Marina.  Considering the absolute devastation they experienced from “the hurricanes”, it is a remarkable comeback story.  This year, the BVI Spring Regatta enjoyed double-digit growth due in large part to their amazing determination to make it all happen.

    Finally, off across the great Atlantic Ocean, we find the Warsash Sailing Club hosting yet another challenging weekend of sailing on Southampton Water and the infamous Solent for their HELLY HANSEN Warsash Spring Series for fleets of IRC boats and one-design classes of J/70s, J/88s, J/109s; as well as a unique J/Sprit Class!
     

    J/Fest San Francisco Preview
    (San Francisco, CA)- The annual J/Fest San Francisco is hosting one-design fleets of J/70s, J/105s, and J/111s, hosted by St Francis Yacht Club and hosted on San Francisco Bay. Given the recent trends for weather patterns, the fleet is hoping for more traditional Bay area weather patterns, with some fog in the morning, but sunny out to the east over the valley to produce the classic westerly sea breezes for the weekend of sailing.

    The largest one-design fleet by far is the J/105 class, with twenty-five boats participating off the San Francisco waterfront.  A crowded starting line it will be for many of the top “locals” that have won various major events over time. Those J/crews include Adam Spiegel’s JAM SESSION, Jeff Littfin’s MOJO, Nicole Breault’s ARBITRAGE, Phil Laby’s GODOT, Rolf Kaiser’s DONKY JACK, Ryan Simmons’ BLACKHAWK, and Tim Russell’s NE*NE.

    The J/111s will have tight racing by some of the top dogs in the Bay area, such as past J/111 World Champion Peter Wagner on SKELETON KEY, Dick Swanson’s BAD DOG, and Nesrin Basoz’s SWIFT NESS.

    Leaders of the eight-boat J/70 class may include Chris Kostanecki’s JENNIFER, Chris Snow & John Bridgen’s COOL STORY BRO, Pete Cameron’s KANGAROO JOCKEY, the trio on 1FA (Scott Sellers, Harrison Turner, Geoff McDonald), and Tracy & Christine Usher’s CHRISTINE ROBIN RACING. For more J/Fest San Francisco sailing information
     

    Australia Boat Show Announcement- Debut of J/121 & J/112E!
    (Sydney, Australia)- The team at J/Boats Australia (Yachtspot) will be displaying at the Club Marine Sail Expo over the weekend of 27-28 April 2019.  The Sail Expo is to be held at Royal Prince Alfred Yacht Club, Newport, about 25km north of Sydney.  Yachtspot will be exhibiting the J/121, J/112E and J/70.  Also close by, Yachtspot will also have access to a J/97E and J/88 on another arm of the marina.

    J/121 Australia Updates
    The J/121 is Melbourne-based and will be sailing 600.0nm up the east coast in time for the show, and then venturing another 1,200.0nm up to the Whitsunday Islands in Queensland for some winter regatta racing at Hamilton Island Race Week.  The beauty of the J/121 is that she is fully ocean-capable, so offers the thrills and adventure of not only ocean racing, but also the journey to get to the World’s most beautiful sailing locations.

    Also, on display will be the J/112E from the Elegance range, the epitome of ‘performance cruiser’ design for comfort, style and speed.

    Plus the inimitable J/70, with representatives from the J/70 Australian Class Association on-hand to chat through why they love the J/70 and the benefits this International one-design class can bring to sailors from all ranges of experience, from beginning racers to the most experienced world-class Olympic Medallist.  For more information, please contact Ray Entwistle- ph- +61 2 9997 7158/ email- This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.   Follow J/Boats Australia (Yachtspot) on Facebook here
     

    New England J/Fest Announcement
    (Newport, RI)- The third annual New England J/Fest Regatta is being hosted by Sail Newport the weekend of August 9-11th 2019. This is the third New England J/Fest Regatta limited exclusively to J/Boat owners and crews with racing and social events scheduled throughout the weekend.

    This event capitalizes on the very successful 2017 event and similar successful J/Fest Regattas held in other US regions where participation exceeded seventy boats. Event organizers anticipate more than seventy boats at the starting line for the 2019 New England J/Fest. Expected one‐design classes include J/22, J/24, J/30, J/70, J/80, J/88, J/105, J/109, J/121. The 2019 event will also include a class for J/Cruisers.

    Narragansett Bay is considered a special “home waters” venue for the New England J/Fest as many of the sailboats were locally built in Rhode Island. Once again, Sail Newport has been selected to host the 2019 J/Fest Regatta. Sail Newport has an active racing program that includes a fleet of club owned J/22’s and counts numerous J/Boat owners as many of their most active members. Sail Newport is a State of Rhode Island resource that provides strong support for sailing and has the facilities to successfully host an event of this caliber. The shore side activities for the 2019 J/Fest will be held at the Sail Newport gorgeous new facilities located at Fort Adams.    J/Fest Registration is currently open.

    Information regarding the regatta including logistics, mooring availability, social event signup and hotel accommodations are all located on the J/Fest New England regatta website: http://www.jfestnewengland.com.
     

     
    THE Easter J/24 Regatta Preview
    (Columbia, SC)- Sailed in J/24s since 1987, THE Easter Regatta has been one of the world’s most popular and enduring J/24 events. It offers an excellent mix of shore side events and world-class competition. Whether your’s is an amateur team attending your first regatta or a professional team contending for the top prize, you will find something that impels you to return year after year!

    The Columbia Sailing Club offers first-class facilities. Everyone will appreciate the new Bath House at the beach and camping area, especially the campers! Their “never-leave-the-club” option offers free camping (first-come, first-served), meals every day, and parties galore! The beautiful peninsula and gorgeous beach provides an unparalleled camping experience.

    Most importantly, the down-home southern hospitality ties everything together. This is the tradition that competitors have come to know and love.

    Answering that “call to duty” for J/24 sailors are at least thirteen teams from across the cosmos of the J/24 universe.  Notable characters include such teams like Mike Palazzo’s JO MAMMA from Charleston YC; Steve Wood’s TASMANIAN DEVIL from Sail Newport, RI; Paul Abdullah’s TEAM TARHEEL from Jacksonville, FL; Corey Huseby’s BORK! BORK! BORK! from St Paul, MN; Rob Baldwin’s PIG from Central, SC; and Crisp McDonald’s LEVEL PELICAN from Charleston, SC.   Follow the J/24 Easter Regatta on Facebook  For more J/24 Easter Regatta sailing information
     

    Regatta & Show Schedules:

    Mar 17- Apr 28- Warsash Spring Series- Warsash, England
    Apr 6-7- J/Fest San Francisco- San Francisco, CA
    Apr 9-14- J/22 World Sailing Nations Cup- San Francisco, CA
    Apr 11-14- Charleston Race Week- Charleston, SC
    Apr 13-14- Irish J/24 Westerns- Lough Re, Ireland
    Apr 14-20- Les Voiles de Saint-Barth Regatta- Gustavia, St. Barth
    Apr 18-22- SPI Ouest France Regatta- La Trinite sur Mer, France
    Apr 20-21- J/22 Van Uden Ecco Regatta- Stellendam, Netherlands
    Apr 26-28- Newport to Ensenada Race- Newport Beach, CA
    Apr 27-28- American YC Spring Series- Rye, NY
    Apr 28- May 3- Antigua Sailing Week- English Harbour, Antigua
    May 3-5- Annapolis NOOD Regatta- Annapolis, MD
    May 3-5- Yachting Cup Regatta- San Diego, CA
    May 4-10- J/24 European Championship- Patras, Greece
    May 4- RORC Cervantes Cup Race- Cowes, England
    May 9-12- SAILING Champions League- Palma Mallorca, Spain
    May 10-12- Grand Prix de St Cast- St Cast, France
    May 10-12- RORC Vice Admiral’s Cup- Cowes, England

    For additional J/Regatta and Event dates in your region, please refer to the on-line J/Sailing Calendar.

     
    Gorgeous BVI Spring Regatta
    Silver for Leading J/Teams!
    (Nanny Cay, Tortola, BVI)- The sailors that participated in the 2019 BVI Spring Regatta & Sailing Festival could not have enjoyed a better long weekend of sailing in the sunny Caribbean in the British Virgin Islands.  Hosted by the Royal British Virgin Islands Yacht Club and sailed out of the spectacular Nanny Cay Marine, the various members of the J/Tribe enjoyed racing the 48th edition of the regatta with 60-plus boats.

    The Race week schedule included the traditional Round Tortola Race for the Nanny Cay Cup, followed by Scrub Island Invitational on day two of racing in the Sailing Festival. Then, three great days of racing followed for the 48th BVI Spring Regatta.

    Like they have so many times before, the J/122s enjoyed more racing success in the Caribbean.  This time, in CSA Racing 2 class, it was Tony Mack’s J/122 TEAM McFLY/ EL OCASO that took the silver with a 3-2-1-3-4 for 13 pts.

    In the CSA Racing 3 class, there was more silver to be garnered, this time by Mackenzie Bryan’s J/100 BAD GIRL taking the silver medal with a 1-1-2-2-4 for 10 pts. Fifth in class was Mike Feierbend’s J/24 BRAVISSIMO with a 5-6-3-3-5 for 22 pts.

    Finally, in the CSA Performance Cruising, fourth place went to Kieran Duck’s J/120-mod ESCAPED AUSSIES~ JAGUAR with a consistent 4-4-4-5-4 for 21 pts.  For more BVI Spring Regatta sailing information
     

     
    J/24 North American Champs Update
    (Valle de Bravo, Mexico)- The 2019 J/24 North American Championship is being hosted by Club Nautico Valle de Bravo on their gorgeous lake in Valle de Bravo, Mexico.  The twenty-seven boat fleet consists of USA, French and Mexican teams from across the top fleets in the respective countries.

    Day One- Flawless Weather
    The sailors reveled in flawless conditions in the first day of racing. Winds started at 10-12 knots and increased to 12-16, with occasional higher gusts.

    Under cloudless skies on the picturesque lake in the mountains of Mexico, current J/24 World Champion Will Welles skippered BRUSCHETTA won the first race. Trailing him in race one was American Mark Laura on BABA LOUIE and Mexican Kenneth Porter’s “S”. Welles again won the next race, followed by Mexican Javier Velasquez on TRINQUETE with Laura’s BABA LOUIE in third. Velasquez earned the final victory of the day, as American Tony Parker on BANGOR PACKET and Welles comprised the top three.

    At the conclusion of the day’s racing, at the top of the leaderboard sat Welles’ BRUSCHETTA with scores of 1-1-3 for 5 pts. The balance of the podium was locked in a tie at 10 points: Velasquez’s TRINQUETE had a 7-2-1 while Laura’s BABA LOUIE posted a 2-3-5.

    Day Two- More Gorgeous Sailing
    It was yet another gorgeous day in Valle de Bravo! And, it was yet another day atop the leaderboard for Welles’
    BRUSCHETTA. With boat owner Aroldo de Rienzo aboard as well as Rich Bowen, John McCabe and PJ Schaffer, Bruschetta lodged scores of 1-5-1 on Wednesday. Now able to discard the fifth in race five, Welles has a net score of 7 points in six races (winning four of them to date) of the planned 10-race series.

    Parker’s BANGOR PACKET benefited from a solid day to jump into second place overall, after recording a 3-1-3 for 14 net points. Porter’s “S” moved into third place with 19 points.

    Following a brief postponement while the breeze came in, racing got underway in winds of 8-10 knots, which increased to 10-14 kts with puffs in the high teens. Welles earned his third bullet of the Championship in Wednesday’s initial contest, trailed by Porter and Parker. Then it was Parker’s turn for line honors, his best finish of the series, while Laura and Ramon Benitez’s DE COLORES followed. Leading the fleet back to the docks after the third race of the day were Welles, Porter and Parker. For more J/24 North American Championship sailing information
     

     
    J/120s Duel @ Doublehanded Farallones
    (San Francisco, CA)- Sixty-three boats registered to start the 2019 edition of the infamous Doublehanded Farallones Race, hosted by the Bay Area Multihull Association (BAMA).  This year, most of the top boats completed the picturesque, iconoclastic 58.0nm race between 9 to 10+ hours elapsed time (a not so fast average of ~ 5.8 kts to ~ 6.4 kts).

    Going for it were seven J/crews from various Bay area sailing clubs and most all of them completed the circuit out and around the foreboding Farallones Island and rocks.

    For the first time in recent memory, there was a “big boat” one-design class. The PHRF 3 Class was comprised of entirely J/120s. Winning that “mano’a’mano” battle by just five minutes was Sean & Jeff Mulvihill’s JAMANA in 8:49:14. Taking the silver was Mike O’Callaghan & John Verdoa’s PEREGRINE in 8:54:13.  Then about ten minutes behind them taking the bronze was Timo Bruck & Elaine Scott’s TWIST in 9:14:26. Rounding out the top five were Ludovic Milin & Philippe Jamotte’s SAETTA and Bridgitt Ahern & Gilles Combrisson’s ALCHERA in 4th and 5th, respectively.

    Commented the winning skipper Sean Mulvihill from JAMANA, “a strong J/120 fleet enjoyed having its own division. JAMANI and SAETTA were over early in very light wind at the start, taking 6-8 minutes to re-cross. PEREGRINE had a perfect start, but were caught in a wind hole mid-bay. JAMANI and PEREGRINE traded the lead several times during the race, but JAMANI prevailed at the finish! An exciting race overall for all J/120 crews!”

    Then, in PHRF 5 Class, taking second was Chris Kim & Carl Plant’s J/105 VUJA STAR in 9:29:04, about 45 minutes elapsed behind the lead J/120.  Fourth in class was Jim Hopp & Chris Cartwright’s J/88 WHITE SHADOW.  For SF BAMA Doublehanded Farallones entries and race results  For more SF-BAMA Doublehanded Farallones Race sailing information
     

    Warsash Spring Series- Weekend II Report
    (Warsash, England)- The second weekend is now on the books for the Warsash Sailing Club’s famous HELLY HANSEN Warsash Spring Series. The fleet was blessed, again, with good enough conditions to get in one more race for the IRC handicap fleets and three more for the J/70s.

    In the IRC 2 Class, now sitting in 2nd is Simon Perry’s J/111 JIRAFFE with a 1-2-3 for 6 pts, just one shy of first place overall. And, hanging on to 4th is Chris Burleigh’s J/109 JYBE TALKIN with a 6-5-8 for 19 pts.

    Meanwhile, in the IRC 3 Class, having not raced the third race, sliding down to 4th overall is David Greenhalgh’s J/92 J’RONIMO.

    The hotly contested fleet of J/70s have now sailed nine races.  Sitting comfortably in 1st is Paul Ward’s EAT SLEEP J REPEAT with mostly 1sts and 2nds for 12 pts net. 2nd is Graham Clapp’s JEEPSTER with 39 pts, having not sailed the last three races. 3rd is Phil Chandler’s BLACKJAX with 43 pts. 4th Doug Struth’s DSP with 51 pts, having missed the 2nd weekend of races. And, 5th Martin Dent’s JELVIS with 53 pts, having missed the 1st and 3rd weekend of races.

    To date, the J/88s have three races.  Leading is Gavin Howe’s TIGRIS with all bullets for 3 pts. 2nd Richard Cooper’s JONGLEUR with a 3-2-3 for 8 pts. 3rd Kirsty & David Apthorp’s J-DREAM with a 4-3-4 for 11 pts. Then, rounding out the top five is Dianne & Dirk Van Beek’s SABRIEL JR and Tim Tolcher’s RAGING BULL, in 4th & 5th, respectively.

    The J/109s also have three races on the books.  Winning handily is Simon Perry’s JIRAFFE with all bullets for 3 pts. 2nd is Chris Burleigh’s JYBE TALKIN with a 2-2-3 for 7 pts. 3rd is Rob Cotterill’s MOJO RISIN with 30 pts. And, the balance of the top five are, 4th Bill Stock’s JENGU and 5th Chris Preston’s JUBILEE.

    The all-encompassing J/Sprit division is dominated by J/88s.  They hold all top three spots; 1st is Howe’s TIGRIS, 2nd Apthorp’s J-DREAM, and 3rd Cooper’s JONGLEUR.  For more HELLY HANSEN Warsash Spring Series sailing information
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  • J/Newsletter- March 27th, 2019 J/Sailing News

    The Sun Never Sets on J's Sailing Worldwide

    Two significant sailing series began this past week on the pan-Eurasian continent.  Starting the farthest “east”, the Russian J/70 Sailing League kicked off their season-long series in Sochi, Russia, with twenty-three teams enjoying a stormy weekend on the Black Sea. Then, at the opposite end of the spectrum, the HELLY HANSEN Warsash Spring Series began in England, hosted by Warsash Sailing Club for IRC handicap racing and one-design classes for J/70s, J/88s, J/109s and the new J/Sprit Class.

    Down in the Caribbean, the St Thomas International Regatta enjoyed four spectacular days of sailing in the aquamarine waters off the eastern end of US Virgin Island, hosted by St Thomas YC and sailed out of beautiful Cowpet Bay.

    Headed over to the Americas, we find two events took place, again at extreme ends of the continental USA.  Up in the Pacific Northwest, the Center Sound Series, hosted by Corinthian YC of Seattle, held their third and final race of the series on Puget Sound for PHRF handicap fleets as well as a J/105 one-design class. Down in southern California and Mexico, the Newport Harbor to Cabo San Lucas Race finally finished. Normally, it is an 800.0nm “barn burner” downwind. However, for the fleet that included a J/124, J/121, and J/125, it was possibly one of the slowest “Cabo Races” on record to the cute little seaside resort at the bottom of the Baja Peninsula.

    Finally, in South America, the annual J/24 Campeonato del Oeste was sailed off the pretty mountain lake of Potrerillos, Mendoza, Argentina for a highly competitive dozen-boat fleet.
     

     
    J/99 USA Debut @ Pacific Sailboat Show
    (Richmond, CA)- Don't miss the 2019 Pacific Sailboat Show from April 4th to 7th, 2019 at the Craneway Pavilion and Marina Bay Yacht Harbor in Richmond, CA! Get your tickets here- https://pacificboatshow.com/

    Making her USA boat show debut will be the new J/99, a 9.9 meter (32.6’) crew-friendly, offshore-capable speedster.

    The J/99 is the newest addition to the J/Sport range, combining headroom and comfortable interior accommodation with the tiller-driven responsiveness of a sport boat.

    Now more than ever, sailors are attracted to adventure-filled, signature events (Fastnet, Middle Sea, Chicago-Mac, etc.) where straight-line speed, sail handling, strategy and weather routing are all equally put to the test. The J/99 is designed to excel in these events (both fully crewed and short-handed) while delivering the exhilarating, family-friendly experience the J Sport range is known for.

    Please be sure to contact Norm Davant at SAIL California for more information- ph# (510) 685-7453 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..   Learn more about the J/99 Shorthanded Speedster here
     

     
    Celebrating the Life of Paul Heys
    (Hamble, Southampton, United Kingdom)- The sailing world paid tribute to one of its own on March 19th as 500+ sailors gathered at Royal Southern Yacht Club in Hamble, UK to celebrate the life of Paul Heys- husband, father, brother, friend, colleague, sailing mate, and sailing entrepreneur (pictured above on the newly introduced J/99 in England).

    A dock walk thru Port Hamble Marina and Hamble Marina Services only scratches the surface of the impact Paul’s love and dedication for sailing had on the greater sailing community. J/Boats of all sizes and vintages are around every corner, from early model J/80’s and J/105’s to last year’s IRC World Champion J/112E and the newly launched J/99 Hull #1.

    Paul only had one speed, and that was full speed ahead (like steering the first J/121 above off Bristol, RI). He woke earlier and worked later, and in between, managed to accomplish more in a day than most do in a week. Whether on a boat or in the boatyard, he inspired everyone around him to “do the job right” and along the way gave many young sailors their first opportunity to work in the sailing industry. He went the extra mile to make sure everyone was having the most fun possible with their boats. Sailing couldn’t have asked for a better ambassador.

    Paul will forever be part of the J family and the J story. He and Marie-Claude were there for the first J/80 Worlds in 2001 in Newport, and for so many subsequent firsts including the launch of J/122 hull #1 in 2006, and the more recent hull #1 launchings of the J/121 and J/99. The face of one-design keelboat racing in the UK is forever changed thanks to the J/80, J/109, J/88, J/111, and J/70 classes that Paul and his J/UK team incubated and supported, not to mention the many other J designs he introduced to the UK market and successfully campaigned at the highest levels. The annual J/Cup regatta, founded by Paul, is one of the most prestigious keelboat events on the UK schedule. The 2019 J/Cup, slated for July 18-20 at Royal Southern Yacht Club, is expected to be the biggest yet.

    Paul’s lifelong devotion and passion for sailing was second to none, and his legacy will live on through everyone who knew him, the numerous J/one-design fleets and annual J/Cup regatta he founded, and the many other thousands of sailors he inspired along the way. Paul would have wanted to share the credit with his incredible team (both past and present) at J-UK / Key Yachting. He was after all the consummate teammate. We will miss you Paul.
     

     
    Bigger than Ben Hur!
    Season Preview - J/70 UK and Ireland Class
    (Southampton, United Kingdom)- The 2019 season is expected to be bigger than Ben Hur for the J/70 UK and Ireland Class, with ten regattas in the Grand Slam Series, and the first ever J/70 World Championships to be held in the UK. There are over 50 teams racing in British waters, and over 100 international teams are expected for the 2019 Darwin Escapes J/70 Worlds, hosted by the Royal Torbay Yacht Club. Racing for the Grand Slam Series starts 13 April and concludes 27 October.

    Scoring for the J/70 Class Grand Slam Series is calculated by the best five events, with the J/70 UK Nationals as compulsory. Two fabulous trophies, for Open and Corinthian teams, will be presented at the end of the season, and the top teams for the series will be allocated places for the 2020 J/70 World Championships. The Grand Slam Series events are all based around weekends with a schedule of racing over no more than 2-3 days, except the UK Nationals, which runs for four days.

    “Many of the UK teams have been training over the winter, and the buzz in the UK class is stronger than it has ever been,” commented Paul Ward, owner/driver of Eat, Sleep, J, Repeat, and UK Class Secretary. “Time on the water is a big factor to a top performance and going on 2018 results the class will experience extremely competitive racing, last year only three points separated first and fifth. There are now over 1500 J/70s worldwide and the cream of the crop will be in the UK this year, both at the worlds and also the nationals, which is an open event. The UK Class is set for an awesome season!”

    The 2019 Grand Slam Series kicks off next month with two weekends of racing at the Warsash Spring Championships (13-14 April & 27-28 April). Cowes is the center of attention for May and June; the RORC Vice Admirals Cup (10-12 May) is followed by the Southern Championships (01-02 June), hosted by the Royal Thames YC. The UK Training Event (18-22 July) will run alongside the J-Cup hosted by the Royal Southern YC. A full race series will be complimented by practice starts plus coaching and video analysis from the expert term at North Sails. Lendy Cowes Week is the venue for the J/70 mini-series (10-13 August), before the J/70 fleet head to the Royal Torbay YC in Torquay for the J/70 UK National Championships (23-26 August), a compulsory event for the Grand Slam Series. Two weekends of racing at the Hamble One Design Championships (05-06 October & 19-20 October), hosted by the Hamble River SC, will be followed by the final event of the 2019 Grand Slam Series, the Solent Championships (26-27 October), hosted by the Royal Yacht Squadron, Cowes.

    The highlight of the season is the 2019 Darwin Escapes J/70 World Championships (30 August-06 September). This will be the first J/70 World Championships to be held in the UK. Professional and Corinthian teams are expected from all over the world. The J/70 UK and Ireland Class welcomes new members and chartering opportunities are available from boat owners and yacht clubs.   Sailing photo credits- Paul Wyeth/ PWPictures.com   For more J/70 United Kingdom sailing information
     

     
    J/24 North American Championship Preview
    (Valle de Bravo, Mexico)- Hosting the 2019 J/24 North American Championship will be the Club Nautico Valle de Bravo on their gorgeous lake in Valle de Bravo, Mexico.  The twenty-eight boat fleet consists of all Mexican and American teams, with most of the top crews participating from both countries.  Sure to be amongst the leaders of the Mexican contingent will be past Mexican J/24 National Champion Kenneth Porter’s “S”, sailing for the host club- CNVB.

    The leading USA contenders should include Mark Laura’s BABA LOUIE from Seattle YC in Seattle, WA; Tony Parker’s BANGOR PACKET from Annapolis YC in Annapolis, MD; Will Welles’ BOGUS from Portsmouth, RI; and top woman helm- Erica Beck Spencer’s SEA BAGS WOMEN’S SAILING TEAM from Portland YC in Portland, ME.  For more J/24 North American Championship sailing information
     

    Doublehanded Farallones Race Preview
    (San Francisco, CA)- This coming weekend marks the start of one of the most famous offshore shorthanded races in all of California- the Doublehanded Farallones Race. Hosting the event is the San Francisco Bay Area Multihull Association (SF-BAMA). Fifty-seven teams are taking up this epic shorthanded challenge.

    From the start inside San Francisco Bay alongside the Golden Gate Yacht Club, the fleet heads out to sea and around the Southeast Farallones Island, leaving it to port, and then to the finish- a distance of approximately 58.0nm.

    Seven J/Teams are participating in the race. Leading them all should be the group of five J/120s; including Mike O’Callaghan’s PEREGRINE, Sean Mulvihill’s JAMANI, Timo Bruck’s TWIST, Ludovic Milin’s SAETTA, and Bridgitt Ahern’s ALCHERA.  Joining them will be Jim Hopp’s J/88 WHITE SHADOW and Chris Kim’s J/105 VUJA STAR.  For Doublehanded Farallones Race entries and race results   For more SF-BAMA Doublehanded Farallones Race sailing information
     

     
    2019 J/GEAR Spring ShakeOut!
    (Newport, RI)- Spring is just around the corner, believe it or not!  While you are escaping or experiencing the crazy spring weather so far, it is high time to consider getting yourself and the crew ready for another fun summer of sailing on the high seas!

    To help get you in full swing, J/Gear is offering to all J/Owners a 20% discount on all crew gear orders through April 2019.

    Go here to J/Gear (http://jgear.vsport.biz/) and start shopping.  Then, use the following discount code at checkout: JB2019st.   Please note- 1/2 models and Custom J Prints do not qualify for the discount.
     

    Regatta & Show Schedules:

    Mar 29-31- BVI Spring Regatta- Roadtown, Tortola, BVI
    Mar 30- Apr 5- J/24 North American Championship- Valle de Bravo, Mexico
    Apr 11-14- Charleston Race Week- Charleston, SC
    Apr 28- May 1- Antigua Sailing Week- English Harbour, Antigua

    For additional J/Regatta and Event dates in your region, please refer to the on-line J/Sailing Calendar.

    Newport Harbor to Cabo San Lucas Drift-A-Thon
    (Newport Beach, CA)- The 20th running of the 800.0nm Newport Beach to Cabo San Lucas International Yacht Race started with some degree of promise that the weather forecasts would not come to fruition. The first three fleets of boats started off in decent winds from the WNW that slowly clocked as the fleet sailed south down the Mexican shoreline.

    However, the forecasts did, indeed, hold true and the race became somewhat of an anti-climactic event for the late starters.  The winds were so light that nearly all of the Saturday starters (the Maxi’s and Super Maxi’s) dropped out! And, over a third of the rest of the fleet did the same, “turning and burning” under their “iron gennies” to head back to home.

    It was still the usual downwind race, with winds fluctuating from the northeast to northwest, as the fleet ever so slowly crawled down the Mexican coastline, gybing on lifts and desperately looking for pressure anywhere!

    For the three J/Teams that managed to finish the race, there was no question there were many anxious moments as one after another held either the lead in their division or were hanging on to a podium finish (as forecast by the YBTracker.com fleet tracking algorithms).

    Those three boats were Scott Grealish’s brand new J/121 BLUE FLASH, Viggo Torbensen’s J/125 TIMESHAVER from Dana Point YC, and Seth Hall’s J/124 MARISOL from Newport Beach, CA.

    In the battle of the 40+ footers, it was Torbensen’s J/125 TIMESHAVER that yet again out-gunned their classmates, working every inch of advantage, every degree of downwind AWA, every perfect sail combination, to finish the race in 4 days 18 hours 18 minutes to correct out to 2nd in class, missing the ORR 3 Division win by just 4 hours.

    Hanging onto the class lead for the better part of two days was Grealish’s brand new, fresh out of the box (2 hours!) J/121 BLUEFLASH. Interspersed with their moments of brilliance were hours of frustration chasing wind streaks for advantage over their erstwhile competitors. As part of their “training mission”, their hope was to learn as fast as possible how to guide their new 40-foot missile faster down the track, experimenting with every sail combination possible. As the smallest boat in the class, they suffered from the same malaise that the Super Maxi’s and Maxi’s got caught in, little to no wind the further they got down the coast as the frontal system receded away from them. That phenomenon not only forced the biggest baddest boats out of the race, with their speedo’s reading “triple naughts” at times, but that also enabled the top boats in ORR 3 Division to continue to extend their lead. In the end, BLUEFLASH was content with a 5th in class, and gathering an enormous amount of data to help them on their 50th Transpac Race preparations later in the summer.

    In ORR 5 Division, Hall’s J/124 MARISOL took 5 days 9 hours 55 minutes to complete the 800.0nm track to correct out to 4th in class.   Watch YB Tracking of the race here.   For more Newport Beach to Cabo San Lucas Race sailing information
     

     
    Another Epic St Thomas International Regatta
    (Cowpet Bay, St Thomas, US Virgin Islands)- For three days, the 50-plus boat fleet enjoyed near postcard-perfect sailing conditions in the Caribbean off the east end of St. Thomas.  Not surprisingly, the St. Thomas YC’s idyllic location on the beach of Cowpet Bay served as the base of operations for everyone, with plenty of shoreside après ‘sailing festivities. J/Crews garnered their fair share of silverware in the performance CSA racing fleets.  Here is how it all took place.

    Day 1- Picture Perfect
    The conditions could not have been better for the first day of the 46th St. Thomas International Regatta (STIR). Warm trade winds blew an average of 12 to 15 knots with occasional gusts to 20 knots, seas were relatively calm at 2 to 4 feet, and the bright sun made for a balmy 80’s Fahrenheit. What really stood out as a signature feature of STIR was the race committees carefully planned round-the-island-, rocks- and cays-style courses that offered highly competitive racing in an extraordinarily scenic setting. Definitely the best of both worlds.

    “The courses were awesome,” says St. John’s Mike Feierabend, who with his all St. John crew helmed his J/24 BRAVISSIMO to first after two races in the CSA Spinnaker 2 class. “We really love going around the islands. The wind angles on the courses set by the race committee were especially nice.”

    The four-boat CSA Spinnaker 2’s races were each nearly 10-nautical miles and wove around Dog Rock, Little St. James and Packet Rock off St. Thomas’ east end.

    Meanwhile, the eight boats in CSA Spinnaker 1 raced in the same vicinity, but these larger vessels were able to stretch their legs to a greater extent on a duo of longer courses that extended to Buck and Capella island’s off St. Thomas southern Caribbean Sea shore.

    “We sailed well today,” said Antigua’s Pamala Baldwin, who raced aboard her J/122 LIQUID. Crewed by several aspiring professional race boat crew, LIQUID was second in class, yet tied at 5 points with class leader. “We had a one-hour debrief yesterday after the Round the Rocks race and worked out the tweaks. Four of our sailors are new to the boat and we really came together as a team today.”

    Round-the-island courses are something that USA-based PRO (Principal Race Officer) Dave Brennan has been setting for the past several years at STIR.  “Sailing here is special and even more so when racing around the islands rather than marker buoys. These types of courses make it more fun for the average sailor, who wants to sail with friends, especially those who don’t have a lot of expertise with windward-leeward courses. We really work hard to set different types of courses each day. It’s more fun this way and truly something special,” says Brennan.

    Day 2- More Perfect Weather?
    Some of the 50-plus boats racing on the second day stretched their class leads. Others overtook fellow class competitors to jump into the lead. Either way, blue skies, warm seas and winds blowing steadily at 12 to 15 knots over the round-the-island and round-the-buoy courses proved fun for everyone in this St. Thomas Yacht Club-hosted event.

    In the CSA Spinnaker Racing 2 class, it was a case of overtaking rather than lead stretching for the St. Croix-based team aboard the J/100 BAD GIR. With Mackenzie Bryan at the helm, BAD GIRL had a tough time on the regatta’s first race on Friday and needed to retire. The young Crucians, almost all 20-somethings that grew up sailing together in dinghies, came back strong with nothing less than all first place finishes. As a result, BAD GIRL pushed St. John’s Mike Felerabend’s J/24 BRAVISSIMO to second. Both boats were tied at 8-points each.

    Day 3- Windy, squally, sunny finale
    Clouds and a couple of squalls sent windy curve balls across the courses set for the fleet. The big story of the final day of racing was all about the wind.

    “We had light air and heavier air, a little big of everything,” said one sailor. “Today, when the squall blew through in the second race of the day, winds hit over 30 knots. We broached and briefly had a man overboard situation. But, there was no damage, no one was hurt and the team recovered quickly. Overall, it was a really amazing regatta.”

    Tied on points for the lead in CSA Spinnaker Racing 1 Class was Antigua’s Pamala Baldwin’s J/122 LIQUID. However, she lost the count back in the tie-breaker based on number of firsts, settling for the silver.

    In the CSA Spinnaker Racing 2 class, St. Croix’s Mackenzie Bryan drove the J/100 BAD GIRIL to a first place finish. “That squall today was as windy as I’d seen it the entire regatta. So much so that we decided not to hoist the spinnaker on the first run and we were still flying,” says Bryan, who served as a junior crew several years ago when Bad Girl also won her class. “Our strategy was to have good boat handling, minimize mistakes and stay out of the current. The effect of the current was huge.”  St. John’s Mike Felerabend’s J/24 BRAVISSIMO ended second, just four points back. Thanks for contribution- Carol Bareuther.  Sailing photo credits- Ingrid Abery/ Dean Barnes  For more St Thomas International Regatta sailing information
     

     
    Russian J/70 Sailing League 2019 Stormy Kick-Off!
    (Sochi, Russia)- Hosted by Sochi Grand Marina by Burevestnik Group, the fifth season of the Russian J/70 Sailing League kicked-off this past weekend in Sochi, Russia, with sailing taking place on the eastern reaches of the Black Sea.

    In five acts over the 2019 season, with one big final in Kaliningrad in early August, the Russian teams competed to qualify for the SAILING Champions League 2020. In the end, each team sailed six races with AXMAT Team winning, followed by the famous ArtTUBE RUS1 Sailing Team led by Valeriya Kovalenko, and RUS7 in third position.  Here is how it all went down in the battle off Sochi.

    Day 1- Beautiful spring day
    Who were the protagonists for the first event of the season?  Many of the best yachtsmen in Russia joined some of the twenty-three teams participating from across the country.

    Those teams included Burevestnik Sailing Team (former Leviathan) (co-driver Maxim Titarenko), ArtTUBE RUS1 (Valeria Kovalenko), Calipso (Maxim Taranov), the Academy of Sailing of the Yacht Club of St. Petersburg (Anna Basalkina), “Pirogovo” (Yuri Morozov), RUS7 “Sail Lord — ASIA” (Vyacheslav Yermolenko), “Sail Lord – EUROPE (Andrey Ryzhov), NAVIGATOR Trem (Alexandra Peterson), Rocknrolla Sailing Team (Andrey Novikov), X-Fit (Vladimir Silkin), RUS7 (Sergey Shevtsov), “Region-23” (Evgeny Nikiforov), CSKA (Mikhail Poslamovsky), Black Sea (Andrei Malygin), Resurskomplekt (Oleg Tikhonov), “Komatek” (Vyache Lav Frolov), USC (Edward Skornyakov), East-West (Andrey Zuev), ZID art Sailing team (Zoran Paunovich), Parusnik74.ru (Edward Podshivalov), Winner Sailing Team (Alexander Mikhailov), Matryoshka (Natalia Kravets) and Akhmat (Alexander Bozhko).

    For the first day of competition, the fleet was treated to unusual spring weather for Sochi, warm, stable winds, sunny, and great sailing!  Twelve races were held on the first day. The results were very, very close. NAVIGATOR Trem (2-1-7-2), East-West (2-2-7-1), RUS7 (1-3-5-2), Calipso (1-4-1-3) and Akhmat (3-1-2-1) were essentially all nearly tied on points- just three points separating the top crews. ArtTUBE RUS1 and BLACK SEA had a smooth day. The ZID art Sailing team would have taken off much higher than their position in the middle of the table, if were not for their BFD in two races (yes, they were fast and recovered fast!).

    Day 2- The storm obscures the sky ...
    On Saturday, the racing day was cut short by a storm front.  Nevertheless, it was a very intense day of sailing. Only four races were sailed in total, without completing a full round.

    The first three races were relatively calm. But, the fourth race looked like a mini-Volvo Ocean Race! Cold, white mist, winds gusting to 35 knots, waves sweeping boats sideways. So much for sunny, spring-like Sochi ...

    In such extreme conditions, the skill of the crew and coordination around the course was critical to success. Mistakes were very costly.

    Winning the fourth and most epic race was Akhmat Racing Team.  Sailing boldly, faster, and more confident than ever were Alexander Bozhko, Roman Konstantinov, Oleg Kuzmin, Alexander Andrianov and Boris Kucherenko. Just behind them, Zoran Paunovich, Evgeny Neugodnikov, Sergey Volchkov and Daniil Banayan from ZID art Sailing Team planed wildly to the finish line to take second place. And in seconds, finishing third in a cloud of spray was Maxim Titarenko, Vadim Yakhinson, Maxim and Mikhail Sheremetyev from Burevestnik Sailing Team.

    Day 3- Sunny Finale
    After a stormy Saturday afternoon, Sochi presented the teams with wonderful sunny weather and the opportunity to conduct another fourteen very intense races.

    Winning the final day by a landslide was ArtTUBE RUS1 (Valeria Kovalenko), with three 1sts in five races. The surprise of the day was the two victories by Region-23, skippered by Yevgeny Nikiforov.

    Nevertheless, it was the first premiere National Sailing League regatta for the Chechen Republic team AKHMAT skippered by Alex Bozhkov.  In the finale, they managed to snatch their victory from some of the pre-eminent Russian J/70 sailing teams. As a result, they won on a tie-breaker on 2.9 pts average over Kovalenko’s ArtTUBE RUS1.  Third place went to RUS7 skipper Sergey Shevtsov.  Sailing photo credits- Andrej Sheremetyev  For more Russian J/70 National Sailing League News
     

    Center Sound Series Finale- Three Tree Points Race
    (Seattle, WA)- The third and final race of the Center Sound Series took place this past weekend on Puget Sound. In the end, the Corinthian YC of Seattle managed to run three good, challenging races, giving the sailors all they could bargain for- from fast drifting, to hiking hard in 15-25 kts breezes.  Overall, the J/Teams faired well, collecting a significant amount of silverware and pickle dishes for their trophy rooms. 

    In the “big boat” PHRF 0 Class, it was another strong performance for the J/160 JAM, the only certifiable “cruising” boat in a division largely populated by offshore racings machines like TP52’s and other 44 to 55 footers.  In the end, the Fox/McPhail duo on JAM managed a 4th place, but was just one point shy of 2nd place! It was very close racing amongst the big boats.

    The PHRF 2 Class was populated by a quartet of well-sailed J/80s, sweeping their class.  First was Phil Dean’s RUSH, followed in second by John Sezer’s RECKLESS, third was David Schutte’s TAJ MAHAL and fourth was Rick Demmler’s TASTES LIKE CHICKEN.

    PHRF 4 CLASS was the one-design J/105 class.  The top five saw a familiar face at the front of the fleet, showing their transom to everyone else most of the series.  Winning was Erik Kristen’s MORE JUBILEE, followed in second by Bucky Rezabek’s RACERS FORMALLY KNOWN AS HERE&NOW, then Chris Phoenix’s JADED in third, Tom Kerr’s CORVO 105 in fourth, and Allen Hughes/ Shauna Walgren’s CREATIVE rounding out the top five.

    PHRF 6 Class was treated to J/35 domination; proof an old warhorse like the 35 can sail fast on all points of sail.  Winning was Don Leighton’s J/35 TAHLEQUAH, while Tyson Varosyan’s J/35 SOLUTION placed fifth.

    Finally, the battle of the 40-footers took place in PHRF 8 Class.  Placing fourth was Dougherty & Andrews J/125 HAMACHI and fifth was Andy Mack’s J/122 GRACE.   Sailing photo credits- Jan Anderson  For Corinthian YC Seattle Center Sound Series sailing information
     

     
    HELLY HANSEN Warsash Spring Series Starts Up!
    (Warsash, England)- The Warsash Sailing Club on the Hamble River in the United Kingdom started its HELLY HANSEN Warsash Spring Series this past weekend. The WSC PRO paid tribute to Paul Heys of J/U.K., in particular since he was largely responsible for the large fleet of J/Teams that were on the starting line this past weekend. In addition to the two IRC handicap classes, there were three one-design classes of J/70s, J/88s, and J/1092.

    Starting with the Black fleet, leading the IRC 2 Class is Simon Perry’s J/111 JIRAFFE with a 1-2 for 3 pts total.  Sitting in 5th with a 6-5 is Chris Burleigh’s J/109 JYBE TALKIN with 11 pts. Holding on to third in IRC 3 Class with a 2-4 is David Greenhalgh’s J/92 J’RONIMO with 6 pts.

    In the one-design world, the fleet of J/70s enjoyed six quick races, putting the crews through their paces.  Currently leading is Paul Ward’s EAT SLEEP J REPEAT with a 1-1-1-3-2-2 for 7 pts net. Just one point back is Graham Clapp’s JEEPSTER in second and laying in third is Martin Dent’s JELVIS.

    After two races in the J/88 class, Gavin Howe’s TIGRIS is leading with two bullets.  Then, Richard Cooper’s JONGLEUR posted a 3-2 which puts them in second for 5 pts and David & Kirsty Apthorp’s J-DREAM has a 4-3 tally to hold third position.

    Similarly, the J/109 class also saw a double bullet performance, with Simon Perry’s JIRAFFE sitting atop the class.  Second is Chris Burleigh’s JYBE TALKIN and third is Rob Cotterill’s MOJO RISIN.

    Finally, in the newly-created J/Sprit Division, it is Howe’s J/88 TIGRIS leading, followed by the Apthorp’s J/88 J-DREAM in second and Richard Cooper’s J/88 JONGLEUR in third.  Follow the Warsash Spring Series on Facebook here   Sailing photo credits- Close Hauled Photography/   For more HELLY HANSEN Warsash Spring Series sailing information
     

    CAMBURY Crowned J/24 Campeon del Oeste
    (Potrerillos, Mendoza, Argentina)- The Campeonato del Oeste was recently sailed on the gorgeous Andean mountains lake off Potrerillos.  The dozen-boat fleet was treated to a wide variety of conditions over the three-day championship.

    After eleven races, it was clear the regatta had become a three-horse race between CAMBURY, RINA, and MORRUCHO.  The final standings were not determined until the last race, with the team of CAMBURY (Marcelo Freytes, Ricky Homps, Torkel Borgstrom and Ezequiel Despontin) winning by just one point.

    Racing was so close amongst the trio of boats that second place was determined by a tie-breaker.  Winning that count-back was Buenos Aires sailor Nicolas Cubria’s RINA over Sebastian Halpern”s MORRUCHO.  Rounding out the top five were US in fourth and SEAWOLF in fifth.

    Nico Cubria commented on the sailing:
    “On Saturday, we sailed for the Martin Pelado Costa Cup, a tribute to past J/24 sailor Sr. Martín. The best boat of the day was MORRUCHO skippered by Sebastian Halpern. In the afternoon, there was an emotional presentation of prizes that counted on the presence of the wife and children of Martin who, together with Torkel Borgstrom, dedicated warm words and anecdotes remembering Martin. On Sunday, the wind breeze stayed strong in the 12 to 20 kts range, enabling the PRO to run four more races. The fleet has been very close and we hope for a good outcome tomorrow! But, it will be difficult against our friendly competitors, CAMBURY and MORRUCHO. Needless to say, there is great camaraderie amongst the sailors and we look forward to our dinner at the Otaviano Vineyard enjoying some good wines!”
    Follow the Argentine J/24 Class on Facebook here   For more Argentine J/24 Class sailing information.
     

    J/Community
    What friends, alumni, and crew of J/Boats are doing worldwide
    -----------
    * Ben Braden from SAIL NORWEST in Seattle, WA had an opportunity to look over the two latest boats in the J/stable of offshore sailing machines.  Here was his amusing, insightful take on both boats.

    J/99 Doublehanded Offshore Speedster
    This boat is gonna create more temptation in sailors minds then back when Jansson put herring in his favorite cheesy potato dish creating such a delight. She’s been touted as a Market Disruptor by Seahorse Magazine and Versatile & Exciting by Yachting World as she sits proudly on their April 2019 magazine cover.  
      
    The all new J/99, from J/Boats, checks more boxes than any boat they’ve produced in over 30 years, period. After touring the boat this past week in Rhode Island I initially walked away happily amazed at her design, as well as, her bigger sister, the all new J/121. My mind kept harkening back to a time in my youth when we all sailed and raced 25 to 30 foot sailboats and were awestruck and tempted by those massive IOR boats, 50’ and up, sailing ahead of us and finishing before dark on all those mid distance races we knew and loved. Then along came the J/35. Truly an every man’s big boat. A powerful platform that brought with it a sense of the speed and thrills we observed on those big IOR warhorses of the time but in a package that each of us could touch, feel and most importantly a platform that we, the everyday sailor could handle – both race and cruise.

    Bill Schanen, of Sailing Magazine, once reported that the appeal of the J/35 “…was its pure hull form, a sweet easily driven shape free of the rating rule-induced exaggerations that made other handicap racers of the 1980s cranky and difficult to sail. With its light weight and long sailing length, big but uncomplicated rig and sensible deck layout, the J/35 was graced with a responsive yet forgiving nature over a wide range of conditions. These endearing characteristics gave the J/35 a parallel life as cruising boat. Easily handled by a family, it offered plenty of space below for accommodations that were plain but practical.”  
      
    While describing his latest new design, Alan Johnstone shares that “The J/99 opens up a wide range of sailing possibilities. The versatile sail plan, balanced hull form and efficient cockpit will work as well for short-handed offshore sailing as for weekend sailing with friends. The J/99 packs a lot of performance and versatility into a manageable size and budget.”

    Sound familiar?

    After touring the boat on the hard at International Marine last week I was left with a sense of how big it was on deck with a large workable cockpit that blended the sit on the deck aspects of the J/33 with the cockpit seats everyone loves in the J/35 for cruising, daysailing and distance racing. The side decks were spacious, quickly creating images of kayaks or SUP’s on deck for the summer cruise, as well as, hazard free spaces for crew to move freely from bow to stern as duties required. As I walked forward I was reminded of the deck space on a J/120.
          
    Stepping below my response was simply wow – a modern J/35 interior. Everything you need to be comfortable cruising with your family or friends, sitting below after a race or regatta bragging with your crew or escaping the weather for a break while on a distance race. Full functional galley, large forward facing nav area, large double bunk aft cabins port and starboard, double drop leaf table center of the salon, two very comfortable settee bunks port and starboard with an enclosed forepeak cabin housing the head and sail storage, and ample storage throughout the boat. It’s even got a headliner! Granted it doesn’t have 6’ 6” headroom like a true cruising boat, she does have a very functional 5’ 10”ish hair draft that for a race boat of her obvious caliber is astounding.

    So I’ve touched on the similarities of the space and feel of arguably one of J/Boats best performance cruising designs, the all new J/99 also incorporates many of the desirable modern performance traits of the big fast warhorses of today.

    Sound familiar again?
          
    She has a fixed carbon sprit off the bow to easily handle both the A-sails and various code zero type rags that excel in different areas or point to point racing. She also can have water ballast, yep water ballast on a production every man’s boat, approximately 55 gallons per side. Not the type of water ballast that has to be managed constantly to keep the boat upright but water ballast that assists in the boats sail-ability. This type of water ballast, while at its base is weight on the rail, will enable more people to go sailing and perform duties they otherwise wouldn’t be asked to do. Smaller, lighter and less agile sailors can now do the job of that affectionately named deck potato or grinder or can simply stay in the cockpit if they are unable to get out on the rail for a physical reason and the boat can still perform well due to the water ballast holding the rail down.

    Seriously, imagine a scenario that you are able to take your 80+ year old grandfather out sailboat racing and benefit from his years of sailing knowledge being shared with you and your 14 year old lightweight kid while they trim the sails and have a chance of competing against that fully crewed deck filled with butt’s race boat. As silly as this sounds it’s a real thing this type of crew assist water ballast enables. Sure you can still pack the rail and use the water ballast at the same time – but your boat would be that much heavier doing so.
         
    J/121 Shorthanded Offshore Speedster Overview
    Her big sister, the J/121 – in the vein of Orwell’s 1984 newspeak, if my reaction going below in the 99 was wow, the J/121 invited a quick double wow! This boat is big.  Yeah it’s 40’ on deck but she is wide, open and utilizes every bit of that 40’ for working purposes. Below you can swing your wet foulies around over your head there’s so much space and then quickly wipe the spray off the carbon fiber countertops. A touch that floods the senses, carbon fiber panels trimmed out with teak edging – it’s cool, it’s really cool. Double French doors forward leading into the spacious forward bunk, deep and wide aft cabin to port and open aft head to starboard with easy access to what J/Boat sailors worldwide describe as the garage storage area. Her large crew assist water ballast tanks, similar to the 99’s but more volume, are obvious but trimmed well and every system aboard seems to be easily accessible without compromising fit and finish. The galley with double basin sink, top loading deep frig and double burner stove/oven looks super usable and the large forward facing nav area looks about as usable as you find on a 40’ sailboat with plenty of working space and also room for electronics.

    On deck everything at first glance looks well thought out. From her hybrid mainsheet system that leads through the deck to the port and starboard mainsheet winches to all the very raceable control lines led to easily accessible areas along with her outboard twin wheels to get you the visibility you need to react and respond to all inputs for optimal control while sailing. While standing behind the wheel at the true aft end of the boat looking forward I couldn’t help but think how similar everything looked and felt in size and function to being at the helm of the J/145 and I expect this boat to outperform that amazing vessel both on the course and with her accommodations below while cruising.

    With these two designs J/Boats is bringing the modern performance aspects of the big amazing performance machines like the TP 52’s and the offshore Open 40’s to the yacht club near you in a package that will keep your crew list long while also impressing your non-racing family and friends when they hang out in the cockpit while daysailing or enjoy the accommodations below while on a cruise sailing from port to port rather than motoring simply because you can, because the design enables it.
      
    We were able to view these boats while back east for the J/Boat dealer meeting held at the Harken offices in Middletown, Rhode Island in March 2019. Dealers from across the country and as far away as Alaska made the trip to spend the day with the Johnstone’s discussing what J/Boats is doing currently and is planning on doing in the future. Everything from the current models and their build schedules and demand to some great new ideas for smaller and larger models and fleet purchases that are being considered by the family and their network. Exciting stuff actually, and some very promising ideas for what is coming in the near future. For a company founded by the everyday sailor that built itself into a successful family business now on it’s second generation of leaders J/Boats continues to move forward with designs that incorporate modern attributes in attainable platforms accessible for the every day sailor, their families and friends. A model that will never lose it’s market appeal.

    * The J/70 class has grown quickly and, worldwide, has established a reputation as being one of the most competitive offshore keelboat classes in the world.  When Olympic Medallists, World Champions from dozens of prominent classes get eaten for lunch on a regular basis, you know it is rough and tumble going for many of those sailors turned into  top professionals. After getting killed on the race course once or twice, some of those pro’s have never returned.  While others appreciate the competition as an opportunity to learn and become a better sailor.

    Recently, Craig Leweck from Scuttlebutt Newsletter, wrote an interesting perspective on how the class has been managing this enormous influx of professional talent.

    Nobody could have anticipated the explosive growth of the J/70 Class. What was deemed a dumbed-down sprit boat was in fact what the market wanted, which was a boat with decent performance that could be mastered by a wide swath of the boat buying public.

    Having the solid J/Boats brand gave it the legs for growth at the local, national, and international levels. But this growth also created opportunity for skilled pro sailors to increase boat performance and regatta budget. Even multi-talented Jud Smith was writing his crew checks in route to winning the 2018 J/70 World Championship.

    The influence of pay-to-play sailors has led the Class to test some initiatives, the first of which was the inaugural Corinthian US Nationals in 2016. This no-nonsense event required all competitors, including the owner/driver, to provide proof of a valid World Sailing Group 1 (i.e, amateur standing) classification at the time of registration.

    Interestingly, the top performers at this event are generally the same skippers that compete with pro crew, but for the Corinthian Nationals they get back to the roots of recreational sailing. After titles held in Maryland, Massachusetts, and Texas, the 2019 edition will be August 8-11 in Harbor Springs, MI.

    The latest move by the J/70 Class is a change in 2019 requiring all sailors in any J/70 event who do not hold a Group 1 Classification to be members of the Class Association.

    The rules on Class Membership are now as follows:
    1. Any driver of the boat (regardless of Classification) must be a Class Member;
    2. Any crewmember not classified as a Group 1 (i.e., a Group 3 or someone not holding any Classification) must be a Class Member.
    These changes were made to bring more consistency and accountability to the Class by making sure that the professionals sailing in the Class are as committed to the Class Association and have the same level of responsibility as boat owners and drivers.

    In addition, the January 2019 Rules specify that all members of the crew must be listed as part of the registration, entry list, and results for all J/70 events, whenever the skipper or owner is identified. No longer can owners seek an advantage by hiding who they have hired, with the change offering an overall benefit of increased recognition for all crew.

    I give the J/70 Class a lot of credit for advancing these initiatives. One design classes succeed based on the common interests and involvement of its members, with these positive bonds helping to create growth and maintain equipment value. For any class feeling the impact of professionalism, it will depend on the contributions of all members to remain attractive. Here's a link to the Scuttlebutt article.

    * Warrior Sailing Program Expanding to J/22s at Fort Worth Boat Club

    Warrior Sailing is expanding its Basic Training Camp program to include Fort Worth, TX where they have partnered with the Fort Worth Boat Club. Training will take place from May 14 to 16 on beautiful Lake Ray Hubbard on the club’s fleet of J/22s.

    Coaches will instruct onboard J/22s with a crew of three warriors. The club has accommodations onsite for the coaches, so there will not be a lodging cost to the coaches or to Warrior Sailing. If any sailing coaches have an interest in helping out, please let them know immediately!

    For more information, please contact- Cory Kapes/ Warrior Sailing Program Manager / This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it./ phone- (727) 773-6164.  Our Sails are Powered by the Wind, Our Program is Powered by DonationsAdd to Flipboard Magazine.

    Read more...
  • J/Newsletter- March 20th, 2019 J/Sailing News

    The Sun Never Sets on J's Sailing Worldwide

    Two more winter series concluded this past weekend, with sailing taking place on the Mediterranean for both events.  Over in Monte Carlo, Monaco, the Yacht Club Monaco hosted the fifth event in their Monaco J/70 Winter Series.  A big stone’s throw off to the west, the Real Club Náutico de Barcelona concluded their final Barcelona J/70 & J/80 Winter Series, sailed in the same waters as the sailing Olympics a few decades ago.

    Hopping across the Atlantic, the J/22 Midwinter Championship was sailed off Fort Walton Beach, FL, hosted by the Fort Walton YC.  Then, going that same distance further west (e.g. the Atlantic Ocean is ~ 3,000 miles wide, as is the continental USA), two events were taking place simultaneously in Southern California.  The HELLY HANSEN San Diego NOOD Regatta featured highly competitive fleets of J/70s, J/105s, and J/120s, hosted by the eponymous San Diego Yacht Club, with sailing taking place offshore of Point Loma as well as in South Bay inside San Diego Harbor.  Meanwhile, a fleet of offshore racers started the Newport Beach to Cabo San Lucas Race and they are, universally, suffering from an extreme lack of wind…somewhat unusual for the giant Pacific High to pack it in and get pushed around by that insufferable Arctic Polar Vortex.
     

     
    St Thomas International Regatta Preview
    (Cowpet Bay, St Thomas, US Virgin Islands)- If your bucket list includes having a drink at one of the Favorite Yachting Bars in the Caribbean, then tick that box for the St. Thomas International Regatta. Announced in 2017, 50° North (creators of Wight Vodka) and Scuttlebutt Europe announced that the STIR-host (St. Thomas Yacht Club) won its annual contest in a special Caribbean category.

    For those who have never visited, Cowpet Bay is a beautiful place to finish a race and the Club and its bar are located on the beachfront, literally. Plus, for those that are long timers, think back to your first Caribbean regatta and what a great experience it was. The club offers the same vibe year after year, with an emphasis on ‘simple fun and great sailing’. That’s why sailors love it!

    There is no question many sailors are answering that siren call! For those that enjoyed Caribbean racing in the 1970s and 1980s – or heard the stories and wished you were there– this year’s St. Thomas International Regatta (STIR), set for March 21st to 24th, is the place to be!

    A dozen boats are registered for the fourth annual Round the Rocks (RTR) race on Thursday. This one-day event, whose course is a 19 mile circumnavigation of the neighboring island of St. John, is a great way for teams to tune up for the main event starting on Friday. Boats sailing in the Round the Rocks race will start off St. Thomas’ east end off Cowpet Bay, sail counterclockwise around St. John, and finish off St. Thomas.

    “By popular demand, we brought back the Round the Rocks race last year. This sprint around St John is both scenic and tactical. It’s a great way to kick-off STIR, especially with Rock City Brewing Company sponsoring the race and after-racing Happy Hour,” says regatta director, Bill Canfield.

    CSA Spinnaker Racing class has four J/crews.  Topping that pack is Pamala Baldwin’s J/122 LIQUID from Antigua.  Joining them will be Peter Lewis’ J/105 WHISTLER, the recent winner of their CSA 4 class at Heineken St Maarten Regatta; Mackenzie Bryan’s J/100 BAD GIRL from St. Croix YC; and Mike Felerabend’s J/24 BRAVISSIMO from St John YC.  For more St Thomas International Regatta sailing information
     

     
    BVI Spring Regatta & Sailing Festival Preview
    (Road Town, Tortola, BVI)- Hosted by the Royal British Virgin Islands Yacht Club and sailed out of the spectacular Nanny Cay Marina, the BVI Spring Regatta & Sailing Festival, has grown back bigger than it has been in recent memory.  It is a fitting tribute that a dozen boats showed up last year to go racing, including members of the J/Tribe that sailed on two J/122s, a new J/121, a J/111, and J/105s.  The 48th edition of the regatta in 2019 will have 60-plus boats and the crews are excited to be sailing in sunny BVI. This year’s regatta runs March 25th to 31st.

    The Race week schedule will include the traditional Round Tortola Race for the Nanny Cay Cup, followed by Scrub Island Invitational on day two of racing in the Sailing Festival. Then, three great days of racing follow for the 48th BVI Spring Regatta.

    There’s plenty to love about Spring Regatta beyond the spectacularly blissful break it gives from the winter doldrums, especially the mix of international crew and range of boats that participate. The fleet includes owners and crews from USA, Germany, BVI, USVI, Netherlands, United Kingdom, Puerto Rico, Canada, Antigua, Belgium, Barbados, Ukraine, Poland and Russia.

    It’s also a guaranteed good time when many of the fleet is returning for their multiple BVISR events, including the four J/crews in CSA Spinnaker Racing class. Topping that pack is Pamala Baldwin’s J/122 LIQUID from Antigua and also Tony Mack’s British crew returning to sail the infamous J/122 TEAM McFLY/ EL OCASO!  Joining them will be Peter Lewis’ J/105 WHISTLER, the recent winner of their CSA 4 class at Heineken St Maarten Regatta; and Mackenzie Bryan’s J/100 BAD GIRL from St. Croix YC.

    “We are very open, very ready, and very excited to welcome sailors from around the world who are returning or making this their first BVI racing experience,” Judy Petz, Regatta Director said. “The energy and spirit of sailing in the BVIs takes more than category five hurricanes to keep people from coming back to sail and race here!”   BVI Sailing Festival sailing information
     

     
    J/70 Sevastopol International Cup Announcement!
    (Sevastopol, Russia)- From September 19 to September 22, 2019, a brand new and grand sailing event will be held in Sevastopol - the first international regatta for J/70’s in Russia- the Sevastopol International Cup. The project organizers promise participation by international teams from Europe, Asia, and across the world.  Simply apply to the National Sailing League in Moscow, see links below. You do not have to bring your own boat, just fly in with your crew!

    Given the fact that the regatta will become the main part of the program of the Sea Festival known as the “Sailing Week of Sevastopol,” the event will be truly unforgettable.  For those international teams interested, there will also be a serious prize fund for the event for the podium finishes as well as daily prizes. Winning teams can either keep the cash prizes or donate them to their favorite charities.

    In fact, as a “sailing league” style event, the supplied J/70’s will be racing in the spectacular bay of Sevastopol, on the warm, azure blue waters of the Black Sea. There are several spectacular seaside spa resorts nearby for regatta participants- like Sevastopol Hotel & Spa or Aquamarine Spa & Hotel.

    Note- the event will also be broadcast across Russia, Europe, and the rest of the world with “live” feeds over the Internet.

    The sailing league is growing and growing, and now the National J/70 Sailing League has their blog on Russia’s national sports portal. As a result, all sailing news from the various regattas taking place in Moscow, St. Petersburg, Sochi, Sevastopol, and Vladivostok can now be found on Russia’s largest sports resource. You can follow their rapidly growing fleet of J/70s at the links below!

    Russian J/70 Sailing League on SPORTS.RU here  Follow the Russian J/70 Sailing League here  Russian J/70 Sailing League promo video (nicely done)  The Russian National Sailing League site is here.
     

     
    2019 J/GEAR Spring ShakeOut!
    (Newport, RI)- Spring is just around the corner, believe it or not!  While you are escaping or experiencing the crazy spring weather so far, it is high time to consider getting yourself and the crew ready for another fun summer of sailing on the high seas!

    To help get you in full swing, J/Gear is offering to all J/Owners a 20% discount on all crew gear orders through April 2019.

    Go here to J/Gear (http://jgear.vsport.biz/) and start shopping.  Then, use the following discount code at checkout: JB2019st.   Please note- 1/2 models and Custom J Prints do not qualify for the discount.
     

    Regatta & Show Schedules:

    Mar 22-24- St Thomas International Regatta- St Thomas, USVI
    Mar 29-31- BVI Spring Regatta- Roadtown, Tortola, BVI
    Mar 30- Apr 5- J/24 North American Championship- Valle de Bravo, Mexico
    Apr 11-14- Charleston Race Week- Charleston, SC
    Apr 28- May 1- Antigua Sailing Week- English Harbour, Antigua

    For additional J/Regatta and Event dates in your region, please refer to the on-line J/Sailing Calendar.

     
    Not Fake News! BAD NEWS Wins J/22 Midwinters!
    (Fort Walton Beach, FL)- Perhaps it was more like a story of “The Incredibles”! Three J/22 World Champions joined forces at the J/22 Midwinter Championship this year, and they didn’t need much luck of the Irish on St. Patrick’s Day to take home the title. On BAD NEWS, New York Yacht Club’s Mike Marshall, with crew Zeke Horowitz and Todd Hiller, never finished lower than fifth in the 30-boat fleet, and were able to hit the docks early to let their fellow competitors battle it out for the remaining places. Marshall won the J/22 World Championship in 2016 in Kingston, ON Canada with Hiller as crew, and Horowitz won as skipper last fall in Annapolis, MD. Their win was well-deserved against the remarkably hot competition in sunny southern Florida.

    Day 1- Dead Heat Flippin’ Friday!
    Thirty-one J/22s convened on the starting line for the J/22 Midwinter Championship at Fort Walton Yacht Club in Fort Walton Beach, FL. Three races took place on the inaugural day in winds between 6-12 knots.

    Two teams dueled hard and both ended up at 8 points each, both logging identical finishes of a 1-2-5. Those protagonists were Kevin Doyle’s MO’ MONEY and Mike Marshall’s BAD NEWS. Needless to say, those two boats are quite familiar with each other and are often thrashing it out at the top of the leaderboard.  Just behind was Jeff Todd’s HOT TODDY, resting in third with 14 pts.  And, just five ticks back in fourth was Chris Princing’s Team Award & Sports/ Evil Dr. Pork Chop from the greater Midwest J/22 fleet.

    Marshall got off to a successful start in race one, as did Chris Doyle’s THE JUG 4 1 and David Muller’s CALL THE BALL. Casey Lambert’s BLACKBURN MARINE RACING took line honors in the middle race, ahead of Kevin Doyle and Jeff Todd. Then, it was Kevin Doyle’s turn for the win, with Marshall and Todd on his tail.

    Day 2- Shifty, Horizon-job Saturday
    A shifty weather pattern that followed a cold front challenged the fleet. In winds between 10-15 knots Saturday, Karen Glass’ PAYASO opened triumphantly, with Mark Foster’s PRESSURE DROP and Doug Weakly’s HNL next. Marshall then earned his second of three bullets thus far, in advance of Doyle’s THE JUG 4 1 and David Muller’s CALL THE BALL. Closing out the day’s final top three were Marshall, Vincent Ruder and Jeff Todd.

    Marshall’s BAD NEWS flourished in the conditions, posting a 4-1-1 on the day for 9 net points in six races, a horizon job in the last two races. Discarding a 5th from race two, the 2016 J/22 World Champion not only broke the day one tie for first place, but secured a HUUUGE (not fake news) 14-point advantage for BAD NEWS over their closest competitors— Todd’s HOT TODDY.

    The balance of the top five were all within five points of each other, heading into the final day of competition on Sunday. Following Todd was Mark Foster’s PRESSURE DROP, whose solid day shot him into third place. Then, just one notch behind him was Lambert’s BLACKBURN MARINE RACING and Doyle’s THE JUG 4 1.

    Day 3- Bad News Eclipses Fleet, Or Not?
    The final day produced more good winds. That was good news! Taking advantage of their tactics, speed, and confidence, the three J/22 World Champions on BAD NEWS started the day with a 4-1, then sailed home knowing they had clinched the title.  Todd’s HOT TODDY from Annapolis YC posted a 5-13-3 to secure the silver.  Meanwhile, Lambert’s BLACKBURN MARINE RACING sailed a solid 9-2-4 to finish just three points back and take the bronze.  While they were hot on the trail for a podium finish, Doyle’s Youngstown YC crew faltered on the last day, posting a 1-8-10 to finish fourth. Then, past J/22 World Champion (another one??) Mark Foster and his crew on PRESSURE DROP (with Rod “Caracas” Favela and Travis Odenbach as crew) from Corpus Christi YC rounded out the top five.

    Marshall credited his team for doing “99 percent of the work.” He explained, “Zeke called stellar tactics upwind in a super shifty venue. Todd called breeze downwind and talked about how we were doing relative to other boats. So, I could change what I needed to if we were going slow or keep trying to do what I was doing if we were going fast.” Marshall said all the competitors would be happy to come back to Fort Walton Beach again, summarizing it was “great sailing, flat water, really shifty and a super inviting yacht club.”  For more J/22 Midwinter Championship sailing information
     

     
    Irish Luck @ Monaco J/70 Winter Series- Act V
    Yacht Club Monaco Team Wins Overall!
    (Monte Carlo, Monaco)– The 6th Monaco Sportsboat Winter Series held from October 2018 to March 2019 ended in style this weekend with the fifth and final Act taking place in spring conditions (sunshine and wind) to the delight of the J/70 contestants that set up their winter base in the Principality.

    Organized by the Yacht Club de Monaco, in collaboration with technical clothing supplier SLAM, the regattas were important for J/70 one-design teams to prepare for the season.  Already, many of the crews from Europe and the rest of the world are focused on the 2021 J/70 Worlds in Monaco.  That was evidenced by all the foreign teams, some from across the Atlantic.  Among the favorites in the J/70 fleet was the Brazilian sailing star Marcelo Ferreira, loyal teammate of Torben Grael, two-time Olympic gold Medallist and bronze Medallist in the Star class.

    In the J/70 class, it was only fitting that on St Patrick’s Day, victory went to Marshall King’s Irish team on SOAK RACING, led by the International J/70 Class President. The team dominated the weekend with two race wins and always in the vanguard, despite determined Swiss opposition on CDE CH, helmed by Nicolas Anklin. Russian Sergey Sobolev on RUS 1271 took 3rd, although two poor results cost him dearly, as fewer than two points separated him from his pursuers all the way down to 7th place. Notably, SOAK RACING also won the Corinthian category, ahead of the Swiss armada.

    For the fourth season, the YC Monaco Race Committee, managed by PRO Thierry Leret, managed twenty-nine races. Amazingly, they averaged nearly six races a weekend. It was a notable accomplishment by YC Monaco’s commitment to provide world-class sailing all winter long to their J/70 fleet.  It was greatly appreciated by sailors across Europe, Russia, and the rest of the world. Can anyone imagine that the vision of YC Monaco’s yacht racing evangelists (including HRH Prince Albert- himself an active J/24 sailor for decades) four years ago would lead to sixty-one teams participating in the 2018-2019 winter series?

    In the final overall ranking for the 2018-2019 season, it was clear that HRH Prince Albert and his team at YC Monaco are producing great outcomes supporting their sailors on the European and International J/70 circuits.  Consistency and competitiveness paid off for Ludovico Fassitelli’s JUNDA BANCA DEL SEMPIONE. It was a successful return to the J/70 for the YC Monaco member, which bodes well for the J/70 World Championship in Monaco in October 2021.

    Another YC Monaco member took 2nd place, Loïc Pompée’s ALLO III, who continues to progress and will be a team to watch out for in the next J/70 Europeans. The Swiss Corinthian team, Bruno Zeltner’s QUARTER 2 ELEVEN team, hung onto their 3rd place and 1st in the Corinthians after nearly 30 races.

    Following the Swiss team in the Corinthians were two Russian teams; second was Dimitri Zaritskii (RUS 1271) and third was Andreï Malygin’s MARIA. Notably, MARIA had no worse than a 2nd in the middle two regattas of the series, winning both of them easily.

    Dates have already been set for the 7th Monaco Sportsboat Winter Series with five Acts and more than seventy boats are lined up to participate.
    • Act 1: November 7-10, 2019
    • Act 2: December 5-8, 2019
    • Act 3: January 16-19, 2020
    • Act 4: February 6-9- 2020- (Primo Cup – Trophée Credit Suisse)
    • Act 5: March 5-8 2020
    For more Monaco J/70 Winter Series sailing information
     

     
    ROSEBUD Tops San Diego NOOD Regatta!
    (San Diego, CA)- The 2019 Helly Hansen NOOD Regatta San Diego was sailed from March 15th to 17th for the nearly 130 teams that were sailing for the weekend.  As has been the case in past years, the J/Teams and their dozens of sailors predominated in the event that saw classic sunny San Diego conditions. Pamela Rose’s J/70 team on ROSEBUD from Chicago/ San Diego emerged as the top team in a talent-laden class and was selected as the San Diego NOOD Challenger for the Helly Hansen NOOD Caribbean Championship!  Here is what happened over the three-day weekend.

    Day 1- Picture Perfect Sailing
    There was plenty to play for on the first day. Friday’s action was focused on the regatta’s San Diego Bay course with four races conducted by the Coronado and San Diego Yacht Club race committees.

    In the J/70 fleet, typically laden with professional sailors, skipper Chris Raab’s team on SUGOI of amateur sailors from Long Beach, California, emerged as the top boat, winning two races to lead the 15-boat fleet by 2 points over Pamela Rose’s ROSEBUD.

    Raab’s team includes close friends Rob Lindley, Kelley Jane Paradise and Erik Lidecus. With winds shifting throughout the day, Raab and his teammates had to focus on their competitors and their positioning on the racecourse.

    “It was a pound the paint kind of day,” Raab said. “We had to sail through some lulls to get to the next puff. If we over-tacked the boat, it was a problem and the sides would tend to get us. We had to be patient, that’s for sure.”

    Whenever an amateur team outshines professionals, it’s a sign of the fleet’s depth. As a winner of 43 national championships, Raab’s career has been nothing short of prolific, but he still leans on the professionals in the fleet for advice.

    “[Pro sailor] Willem Van Waay was super helpful this morning,” Raab said. “He scrubbed the bottom of my boat and told me my rig was too loose, so we developed a new base setting and that speed difference was super helpful.”

    Day 2- More Picture Perfect Conditions
    Racing continued on the second day, with the addition of one-design keelboat fleets on the ocean course, there was plenty of action in the waters off San Diego. While competitors inside San Diego Bay continued their series from Friday, the San Diego Yacht Club race committee set its first race course 2 miles south of Point Loma, where classic Southern California sailing conditions provided an action-packed day of racing for six different classes.

    Day 3- Regatta Photo Finish
    The third and final day showcased plenty of tight racing across all one-design fleets. The regatta’s Ocean Course was set south of Point Loma and the two Bay Courses were set on South San Diego Bay. With light and shifty winds, racers had to stay focused throughout the challenging final day.

    Going into the final race of the J/105s, a 2-point margin between the top-three boats produced a winner-take-all showdown. After two races, Chuck Driscoll and his team on JUICED emerged victorious.

    “This win is important to us,” said Driscoll, of San Diego. “My partner, Tom Hurlburt, and I have been sailing this regatta for twelve years, and we’ve come second many times. This was the first time we’ve been able to put it together for a win.

    "The Driscoll family has a long history with the San Diego Yacht Club. My grandfather was commodore here in 1939. My father won the Star Worlds in 1944 and was the skipper of Intrepid in the America’s Cup trials. My father also won the Lipton Cup, along with my brother and I. Our family has been involved in boating my whole life. We’ve been very fortunate.”

    Rounding out the podium in the J/105s were Stewart Cannon’s J-OK with 16 pts in second position and Steve Howell’s BLINK in third place with 18 pts.

    In the J/120s, John Laun’s CAPER took class honors with a near whitewash. They won five of six races to take class with just 7 pts total.  Second was Chuck Nicholls’ CC RIDER with 15 pts and then Ernie Pennell’s MAD MEN secured third with 16 pts.

    Pamela Rose’s J/70 team on ROSEBUD emerged as the top team in a talent-laden class and was selected as the San Diego NOOD Challenger for the Helly Hansen NOOD Caribbean Championship.

    Each stop of the 2019 Helly Hansen NOOD Regatta series produces a challenger for the Caribbean NOOD Championship with Sunsail in the British Virgin Islands in late October. This year’s San Diego challenger is crew of Pamela Rose’s J/70 ROSEBUD. Sailing with Rose was Willem van Waay, who accepted the trophy on her behalf.

    “I’ve had this regatta snatched away from me more times than I can remember,” said Van Waay, of Coronado, California. “Pam did a great job steering. The conditions were challenging each day, and consistency was key. We’re excited to head to the British Virgin Islands later this year and we should be competitive.”

    Rounding out the top five in the J/70 class were Jeff Janov’s MINOR THREAT with 35 pts, easily posting the best record in the last six races with four 1sts in their tally. Third was Raab’s SUGOI, winning Corinthians as well.  Fourth was Mexico’s Fabian Gomez-Ibarra’s VAGAZO and fifth was Steve Wyman’s NUNUHUNU.

    The balance of the Corinthian Division podium included Tony Collins’ FLY and David Hochart’s TANGAROA.

    In the NORTH SAILS RALLY, Tom Fisher’s J/105 VIGGEN took third place amongst a widely varying fleet of day sailors from across San Diego Harbor.  Sailing photo credits- Paul Todd/ Outside Images.com. For more Helly Hansen San Diego NOOD Sailing Regatta information
     

    Newport to Cabo Drift-A-Thon Update
    (Newport Beach, CA)- The 20th running of the 800.0nm Newport Beach to Cabo San Lucas International Yacht Race started this past week. So far, it has proven to be such an anti-climactic event, with such light airs, that nearly all of the last fleet to the starting line on Saturday (the Maxi’s and Super Maxi’s) have dropped out!! And, over a third of the rest of the fleet have done the same, “turning and burning” under their “iron gennies” to head back to home.

    It is still a downwind race, with winds fluctuating from the northeast to northwest, as the fleet ever so slowly crawls down the Mexican coastline, literally! For the three J/Teams still on the race track offshore, they may be suffering anxiety attacks as each zephyr of wind rolls down from the heavens above to power them down, euphemistically speaking, to their ultimate destination in Cabo San Lucas.  Those three boats are Scott Grealish’s brand new J/121 BLUE FLASH, Viggo Torbensen’s J/125 TIMESHAVER from Dana Point YC, and Seth Hall’s J/124 MARISOL from Newport Beach, CA.  Live YB Tracking of the race here.  For more Newport Beach to Cabo San Lucas Race sailing information
     

     
    Russians Win Barcelona J/70 Winter Series
    (Barcelona, Spain)- Sixteen boats sailed the 2018- 2019 winter series in Barcelona, Spain; the event was hosted by Real Club Náutico de Barcelona. The sixteen teams hailed from across Europe- Cyprus, Great Britain, Spain, Poland, Portugal, Russia, and Italy.

    Winning the overall winter series was the Russian crew of AMAIZ SAILING TEAM with Egor Terpigorev, Sergey Dobrovolskiy, Victor Serezhkin and Slava Martynov from Cyprus Yacht Club. Their winning record was 5-1-1-4-1-1-10-7 for 20 pts.

    Tony Hayward’s SERIOUS FUN from Great Britain, skippered by Mark Lees from Royal Thames YC, was DSQ’d in the last race to lose the regatta by just 1 point.  For Hayward’s team, it was serious training for the 2019 J/70 World Championship that will be hosted in Torquay, England.

    The balance of the podium and top five were all hot, fast Spanish crews.  Third was Pablo Garriba’s RCN Barcelona team on TENAZ with 26 pts. Fourth was another Spanish crew on Luiz Martinez Doreste’s FORTY-FIVE with 30 pts. Fifth place went to David Marco’s Spanish crew on REBUFF from Real Club Nautico Barcelona with 36 pts.

    In the J/80 Winter Series, Marc de Antonio's J/80 BRIBON MOVISTAR won the series handily. Taking the silver was MIKAKU, sailed by Rosa Artigas (also top woman helm) and Luis Corbella.  Rounding out the podium in the bronze position was AKEWUELE, skippered by the second woman helm- Silvia Ravetllat.
    For more Barcelona J/70 & J/80 Winter Series sailing informationAdd to Flipboard Magazine.

    Read more...
  • J/Newsletter- March 13th, 2019 J/Sailing News

    The Sun Never Sets on J's Sailing Worldwide

    While those in the northern hemisphere seem to be experiencing quite bizarre weather across the spectrum, our friends Down Under in South America appear to be enjoying a rather temperate early fall. Along the Pacific coast of Chile, the J/70s enjoyed a strong turnout for their 2019 Chilean Nationals, sailed off Algarrobo, and hosted by the gracious members of the Real Club Nautico de Algarrobo.

    Just above South America, the Caribbean sailors saw yet another of their famous winter regattas take place, this time it was in the nearly idyllic setting of Christiansted, St Croix. There, the St Croix Yacht Club, situated on a spectacular beach, held their 2019 St Croix International Regatta with a J/100 and J/24s participating in the festivities.

    Moving still further north, the spring regatta season is starting to kick in across North America. Starting in Mexico, the Vallarta Yacht Club held their incredibly fun-loving, totally laid-back Bahia de Banderas Regatta in simply spectacular weather conditions during the four-day event.

    Migrating further north to the USA, the Bacardi J/70 Winter Series just finished the third and final event at the Bacardi Invitational, hosted by Coral Reef YC in Miami, FL and sailed on the azure waters of Biscayne Bay….like their counterparts in Chile and Mexico, the conditions were nearly idyllic.

    Heading west, the J/105 Midwinters were sailed on Eagle Mountain Lake, hosted by the famous Fort Worth Boat Club in Fort Worth, Texas.

    Moving to the Pacific coast again, two regattas were taking place on San Francisco Bay simultaneously, not an unusual scenario for those rabid, passionate sailors in the Bay area. On the northeastern part of the Bay, the Big Daddy Regatta was hosted by Richmond YC, off Richmond, CA, for PHRF handicap classes as well as a J/105 class. Across the Bay to the west, the St Francis YC hosted the first of three events in the J/22 California Dreamin’ Match Race Regatta series.

    Finally, moving into the Pacific Northwest, the Corinthian YC of Seattle hosted the second of their three event Center Sound Series, the 27.0nm Scatchet Head Race, with dozens of J/Teams participating.
     

    J/22 Midwinter Championship Preview
    (Fort Walton Beach, FL)- The J/22 class will be hosting their Midwinter Championship at Fort Walton Yacht Club in Fort Walton Beach, Florida.  The J/22 sailors seemed to enjoy the tremendous hospitality at FWYC in the past and, as a result, the J/22s will have one of their largest Midwinters in years- with thirty-two boats registered to go racing from March 14th to 17th.

    Not surprisingly, many of the usual suspects from across the country are making their annual winter pilgrimage south for the regatta; just about all the major J/22 fleets are well-represented.  Some of those leading teams include Mark Foster’s PRESSURE DROP (with Rod “Caracas” Favela and Travis Odenbach as crew); Casey Lambert on BLACKBURN MARINE RACING from Houston, TX; Chris & Jennifer Princing’s TEAM AWARD & SPORTS/ EVIL DR. PORK CHOP from Tawas Bay, MI; Jeff Todd’s HOT TODDY from Annapolis, MD; Chris Doyle’s THE JUG 4 1 from Youngstown, NY; Mike Marshall’s BAD NEWS from Newport, RI; Benz Faget’s FATS from New Orleans, LA; and Farley & Barrett Fontenot on REPEAT from Houston, TX.  That is quite a rough bunch of hombres to have to contend with for the podium!  There are more than a few Worlds, North American, and Midwinter Championships spread amongst that group!
    For more J/22 Midwinter Championship sailing information
     

     
    Newport Beach to Cabo San Lucas Race Preview
    (Newport Beach, CA)- The 20th running of the 800.0nm Newport Beach to Cabo San Lucas International Yacht Race starts this week. This edition of the race will be especially exciting as the West Coast prepares for a huge season of offshore sailing leading up to the 50th Transpac. The first ORR handicap classes start Thursday, March 14th at 1300 hrs, followed by five more ORR handicap classes starting on Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

    Typically a downwind run to Cabo San Lucas, racers enjoy the sunny afternoons and warm, moonlit evenings as they journey down the coast.  The race is a test of weather routing, excellent navigation, and the crew pressing hard 24 hours a day.  For the most part, it is a very reachy race early.  Then, as the fleet makes its way down the coast of Mexico, the winds move further aft and the boats start gybing in northerly winds that can often peak at 15-25 kts during the daytime.

    Three very fast J/crews will be on the race track offshore, all hyper-fast reaching machines that have proven to win their fair share of offshore silverware.  Making her race debut will be Scott Grealish’s brand new J/121 BLUE FLASH! After winning its class in the Storm Trysail Club’s Bermuda Race last year, this will be the first true “downhill” test of the J/121 against many of the best SoCal offshore speedsters.

    Perhaps the biggest competitor that BLUE FLASH will face is one of the famous J/125s, Viggo Torbensen’s TIMESHAVER from Dana Point YC. TIMESHAVER’s favorite whipping post has been their buddies on the SC50 Horizon. They may now have to add Grealish’s J/121 BLUE FLASH to their “watch” list as they make fast progress down the Mexican coastline.

    Finally, do not count out Seth Hall’s J/124 MARISOL from Newport Beach, CA.  Their team has proven that in lighter offshore races, like the Newport to Ensenada Race or the SoCal 300 sailed earlier in the year, they have the light air reaching speed and narrow, easily-driven hull to sail fast and get a podium finish.
    Live YB Tracking of the race here.   For more Newport Beach to Cabo San Lucas Race sailing information
     

    Monaco J/70 Winter Series V Preview
    (Monte Carlo, Monaco)- The fifth and final event of the Monaco J/70 Winter Series will be taking place this weekend from March 14th to 17th, hosted by Yacht Club de Monaco, with sailing taking place offshore on Hercules Bay in front of the famous Casino.

    A fleet of thirty-nine highly competitive J/70s from across Europe and other parts of the world will be participating in up to ten races over the course of the weekend. Those teams hail from Monaco, Switzerland, France, Germany, Italy, Russia, Ireland, Brazil, Great Britain, Finland, Ukraine, and Sweden.

    The previous regatta for this fleet was the Primo Cup- Trophee Credit Suisse that took place three weeks ago. Winning that event was Monaco’s own Ludovico Fassitelli on JUNDA- BANCA DEL SEMPIONE, with the Irish crew of SOAK RACING (Marshall King) and the Swiss team of JERRY (Tom Studer) rounding out the podium.  However, the two stalking horses behind this trio were perhaps the most formidable of all.  The winner of Act III was the Russian Andreï Malygin skippering MARIA, taking both the Open and Corinthian titles. And, the winner of Act II was the YC Monaco team of CHARISMA, skippered by Nico Poons.

    With all five crews hoping to take the overall Winter Series title in the grand finale, it will be quite a battle amongst those teams.  All are well-prepared and are hoping to gain valuable experience as they keep a weather eye out for how they stack up against the world’s best for the 2021 J/70 World Championship that will be hosted by YC Monaco.  For more Monaco J/70 Winter Series sailing information
     

    San Diego NOOD Regatta Preview
    (San Diego, CA)- The 2019 edition of the Helly Hansen San Diego NOOD Regatta is taking place this coming weekend from March 15th to 17th, hosted by the famous San Diego Yacht Club on Point Loma.  The regatta has become synonymous with the start of the sailing season for most teams involved in one-design and round-the-cans racing in the San Diego region. It is the premiere event to start the season for various J’s; including the J/70s, the J/105s, and the J/120s.

    The forecast is promising, with temperatures ranging from mid 60s F in the day, with predominantly sunny skies and winds varying from 8 to 15 kts from the West to Northwest.  Remarkably, it seems to be a conspiracy to deliver near postcard-perfect conditions ordered up by the local San Diego Chamber of Commerce!

    Looking forward to such “shorts and shades” weather is the largest class at the event, the fifteen boat strong J/70 fleet with participants from as far-reaching as Guadalajara, Mexico; Miami, FL; and Coeur d’Alene, Idaho. Teams to look for on the leaderboard should be Pat Toole’s 3 BIG DOGS from Santa Barbara YC; Curt Johnson’s AVET 2.01 from California YC; Jeff Janov’s MINOR THREAT California YC; Chris Raab’s SUGOI from Newport Harbor YC; Fabian Gomez-Ibarra’s VAGAZO crew from Coronado, Mexico; and Pamela Rose’s ROSEBUD from Chicago YC.

    The J/105s are fielding a talented fleet of eight boats with many familiar faces hoping to get a jump on their friendly competitors in their first regatta of the year. Many past SDYC NOOD champions and podium finishers are in the mix, including Jon Dekker’s AIR BOSS, Steve Howell’s BLINK, Stew Cannon’s J-OK, and Chuck Driscoll & Tom Hurlburt’s JUICED.

    With five boats, the J/120s are all about consistency and who’s showing up for the party with a well-oiled machine in the form of crew- trimmers and tactician!  It is never easy to handicap this fleet.  Nevertheless, watch for the usual suspects like John Laun’s CAPER, Chuck Nichols’ CC RIDER, Ernie Pennell’s MAD MEN, and Tim Hogan’s SHAMROCK to be fighting for the top of the leaderboard. 

    In the North Sails PHRF Rally, the J/105 VIGGEN sailed by Tom Fisher from San Diego, CA will be looking forward to their Saturday on the water with family and friends.  For more Helly Hansen San Diego NOOD Sailing Regatta information
     

    Warsash Spring Series Preview
    (Warsash, United Kingdom)- The Warsash Sailing Club is about to undertake its annual rite of spring- two events that run from mid-March to the end of April.  The first is the Helly Hansen Spring Series that starts March 17th and runs every Sunday until April 28th.  During the mid-series break, the Warsash SC hosts the Spring Championship that runs over two weekends from April 13-14 to April 27-28.  It is a hugely popular event for J/sailors to get themselves tuned-up for the major summertime events on the Solent and for the RORC Offshore events that run all summer.

    The larger J’s are sailing on the Black Group/ Championship course; that includes a large IRC contingent of J/teams sailing J/111s, J/112E, J/122, J/88s, J/92, and a J/99.

    In the Black Group IRC class are:
    • five J/109s: Simon Perry’s JIRAFFE, Chris Burleigh’s JYBE TALKIN, David Richard’s JUMPING JELYFISH, and Rob Cotterill’s MOJO RISIN’;
    • four J/111s: Paul Griffiths’ JAGERBOMB, Chris Jones’ JOURNEYMAKER II, Tony Mack’s McFLY, and Simon Bamford’s KESTREL; and
    • Chaz Ivill’s J/112E DAVANTI TYRES and Chris Daniel’s J/122 JUNO.  
    All are familiar boats, all famously fast! That should be an interesting class to watch!

    A new Black Group J/Sprit Class includes the following teams:
    • five J/88s: David & Kirsty Apthorp’s J-DREAM, Tim Tolcher’s RAGING BULL, Richard Cooper’s JONGLEUR, Dirk & Dianne van Beek’s SABRIEL JR, and Gavin Howe’s TIGRIS; and
    • David Greenhalgh’s J/92 J’RONIMO and Adrian Johnson’s J/105 FLAWLESS J.
    The smaller J’s race on the White Group/ Championship course include the J/70s. Dueling for leadership all spring long should be Doug Struth’s DSP, Paul Ward’s new EAT SLEEP J REPEAT, Graham Clapp’s JEEPSTER, Philip Rees’ BRYN, Calascione/ Ripard’s CALYPSO, Alex James’ POLARIS, and the Ian Wilson & Marshall King duo on SOAK RACING from Ireland.  For more Helly Hansen Spring Series sailing information
     

     
    J/120 Nationals Announcement!
    (Cleveland, OH)- Edgewater Yacht Club is pleased to announce the 2019 J/120 Nationals will be held in conjunction with the popular Cleveland Race Week. The Great Lakes J/120 Fleet looks forward to sailing on Lake Erie from June 14th to 16th, 2019. This is a great opportunity for J/120 owners on eastern Lake Erie, Lake Ontario and Lake St. Clair to meet in the middle and enjoy the late Spring sailing that is part of the legendary Cleveland Race Week.

    For those needing a tune-up and a great kick-off to the season, head to Bayview Yacht Club for the Bayview One-Design Weekend, and then travel to Toledo Yacht Club for the ever-popular Mills Race and then head to Cleveland for the J/120 Nationals.

    As host of the J/120 Nationals, Edgewater YC will provide convenient dockage for all J/120 teams and great racing on the open waters of Lake Erie.  The Notice of Race is posted here.  For more J/120 Nationals information and Cleveland Race Week sailing information
     

     
    2019 J/GEAR Spring ShakeOut!
    (Newport, RI)- Spring is just around the corner, believe it or not!  While you are escaping or experiencing the crazy spring weather so far, it is high time to consider getting yourself and the crew ready for another fun summer of sailing on the high seas!

    To help get you in full swing, J/Gear is offering to all J/Owners a 20% discount on all crew gear orders through April 2019.

    Go here to J/Gear (http://jgear.vsport.biz/) and start shopping.  Then, use the following discount code at checkout: JB2019st.   Please note- 1/2 models and Custom J Prints do not qualify for the discount.
     

    Regatta & Show Schedules:

    Mar 14-17- J/22 Midwinter Championship- Fort Walton Beach, FL
    Mar 12-16- Miami to Havana Race- Havana, Cuba
    Mar 14-17- J/70 Monaco Winter Series V- Monte Carlo, Monaco
    Mar 15-17- San Diego NOOD Regatta- San Diego, CA
    Mar 22-24- St Thomas International Regatta- St Thomas, USVI
    Mar 29-31- BVI Spring Regatta- Roadtown, Tortola, BVI
    Mar 30- Apr 5- J/24 North American Championship- Valle de Bravo, Mexico
    Apr 11-14- Charleston Race Week- Charleston, SC
    Apr 28- May 1- Antigua Sailing Week- English Harbour, Antigua

    For additional J/Regatta and Event dates in your region, please refer to the on-line J/Sailing Calendar.

    MORENITA Wins Dramatic Chilean J/70 Nationals
    (Algarrobo, Chile)- A highly competitive fleet of nineteen boats eagerly rigged up, tuned their boats to perfection, and headed out across the Pacific Ocean to the starting line for the 2019 Chilean SANTANDER J/70 Nationals. Hosting the regatta was the Real Club Nautico del Algarrobo.  As the fastest growing class in Chile since the J/24, and with the best sailors in South America, the J/70 continues to attract the best talent for both skippers and crew. What no one anticipated was the regatta's outcome was going to be determined by a tie-breaker based on the results of the final race.

    In the end, it was an incredibly hard-fought regatta for the two protagonists in this year’s J/70 Nationals. Both sailors have tremendous pedigree as both have won many championships in J/24s, Lightings, Soto 40s, and Snipes, to name a few.  Winning the tie-breaker was Mathias Robertson’s MORENITA with a 3-1-4-1 record for 9 pts.  Losing the countback to settle for the silver on the podium was Pablo Amunátegui’s SANTANDER with a 2-2-2-3 scoreline.

    Meanwhile, the Corinthians Division celebrated their winners José Antonio Jiménez’s team on DARK SIDE.  Here is what took place each melodramatic day on the water.

    Day 1- Friday- Big Seas, Big Battle
    The first day of racing started off with winds of 10 to 12kts from the northwest with very choppy seas from a large frontal system offshore. The PRO managed to run two races before the offshore wind finally shut down, a frequent occurrence after a slow moving frontal system passes over the Andes.  Typically, the land heats up in such circumstances and creates an onshore, sea breeze from the west/southwest.  But, that was not the case this time around.

    The Robertson brothers, Ro Robles and Pino Cubillos, took the lead at the end of the first day with a 3-1 score for 4 pts.  The Robertson’s are from amazing Chilean sailboat racing pedigree; they are sons of Felipe Cubillos, their father raced in the Portimao Race (35,000nm around the world in Class 40) together with José Muñoz. Tied on points with the Robertson’s was Pablo Amunátegui’s SANTANDER with a 2-2 scoreline for 4 pts as well.

    Day 2- Saturday- Light Air Dramas
    On Saturday, light wind conditions offshore persisted, prompting an onshore postponement until 1500 hrs! Desperate to get in at least once race, the PRO sent the fleet offshore at 1530 hrs to get in just one race for the day. Incredibly, it was SANTANDER that maintained their steady pace, with skipper Amunátegui posting yet another 2nd place to take over the lead of the regatta.  Sitting just two points back was Robertson’s MORENITA with a 3-1-4 tally for 8 pts.

    Day 3- Sunday Crazy, Dramatic Finale
    The final day dawned with more light winds. The forecasts looked a bit dismal, unfortunately. Again, the PRO had to do an onshore postponement at 0900 hrs that lasted, coincidentally, until 1500 hrs. At that point, the decision was made to make an attempt to get in one more race in about 6 kts of breeze from the normal seabreeze direction of West/ Southwest. The stakes were high, as whatever the outcome of the race, it was going to determine the championship.

    MORENITA had a fantastic start on the RC side of the line with great speed. From there, they took the lead at the first weather mark and simply sailed away to win the race. Meanwhile, their principal competitor, SANTANDER rounded in 5th place. At that point, it seemed like the regatta was over for SANTANDER. But, the drama was only going to build dramatically as the fleet continued to go around the buoys.

    On the first run, the wind went a little to the right and SANTANDER and Francisco Perez’s ELEANOR RIGBY were the first boats to gybe. Andres Ducasse’s TSUNAMI and Juan Reid’s WINDMADE/ DREAM YACHT CHARTERS stayed close to shore, looking for more pressure.

    Then, the left shift came in and both SANTANDER and ELEANOR RIGBY had a good recovery, but it was not enough. WINDMADE/ DREAM YACHT CHARTERS managed to gybe and run into the leeward gate in front of SANTANDER; 4th at that moment in the race, but still 2nd in overall in the standings.

    On the second windward leg, with good speed, SANTANDER took the left (closer to shore) and both TSUNAMI and WINDMADE/ DYC took off to the right on port tack, despite the left-swinging wind direction. SANTANDER made it work along the shore and rounded the second windward mark in 2nd place.  Next, was TSUNAMI in 3rd, WINDMADE/ DYC in fourth, ELEANOR RIGBY 5th, and Matias Seguel’s VOLVO in 6th.

    IF nothing changed on the downwind run to the finish, SANTANDER’s big gain meant they would be winning the regatta!  However, positions could, and did, change!

    Again, the wind shifted into the right in the final 100 meters upwind at the weather mark, so WINDMADE/ DYC and TSUNAMI gybed onto port downwind, onto the favored gybe. Meanwhile, SANTANDER was still in second place, choosing the right side of the course downwind, closer to shore. Notably, the wind was decreasing in pressure and making everything more difficult tactically across the entire course.

    In the final approach to the finish line, SANTANDER made two gybes, in front of TSUNAMI and WINDMADE/ DYC.  But, they did not block WINDMADE/ DYC, who was free to sail a faster angle to the RC finish boat.  Incredibly, WINDMADE/ DYC finished in 2nd by one foot (!) ahead of SANTANDER! Thus, putting SANTANDER in between them and TSUNAMI at the finish! Those two gybes by SANTANDER may go down as the “text book” wrong move, hopefully never to be repeated again by the moribund crew!

    As a result, MORENITA won, with SANTANDER losing the tie-breaker to take second, with VOLVO third.

    Rounding out the top five overall was also determined on yet another tie-breaker on 21 pts each! Winning that “mano-a-mano” combat was Reid’s WINDMADE/ DREAM YACHT CHARTERS, taking fourth over Ducasse’s TSUNAMI in fifth place. Wow, that last race completely jumbled the ENTIRE top five standings in just 100 meters of the finish line!! Panic and anxiety in Algarrobo!!

    Meanwhile, in the Corinthians division, José Antonio Jiménez's DARK SIDE finished 6th overall with only Jimenez family members on board.  Taking second was Patricio Natho’s TRILOGIA and in third was Cristóbal Pérez’s IL MOSTRO.

    The Race Committee was managed by Fernando Pérez Spencer and assisted by Claudio Gonzalez and Javier Alias Corniza. The Protest Committee was chaired by Claudio Salvatore. Begoña Gumucio was the PRO for the regatta and also coordinated all the activities ashore. The ex-Olympic sailor was crucial for the success of the championship on the water, social events, and the award ceremony.

    On Saturday morning, the 2020 J/70 Nationals host club and town was decided and the two finalists were Algarrobo and Lake Rapel. The Chilean J/70 Class directors are looking forward to sail outside Algarrobo and hope to resolve the logistics scenario to go sailing on Lake Rapel in the foothills of the Andes Mountains; the lake is about 2 hours south of the capital city of Santiago ~ 100 miles.
     

    Bacardi J/70 Series Gets CATAPULT’ed!
    (Miami, FL)- Thirty-seven J/70 teams from ten nations (USA, Argentina, Italy, Monaco, Brazil, Great Britain, Chile, Germany, Canada, and Mexico) sailed the third and final series of the Bacardi J/70 Winter Series- the Bacardi Invitational- this past weekend in simply stellar weather conditions for all three days.  Coral Reef YC hosted the event, in coordination with Biscayne Bay YC, and the combined PRO’s managed to run eight races, much to the delight of the sailors.

    A stellar fleet was assembled for the event, following on the previous week’s J/70 Midwinter Championship that was hosted in the same venue. In the end, it was Joel Ronning’s crew on CATAPULT from Lake Minnetonka, Minnesota that won the event, with crew of Victor Diaz de Leon, Patrick Wilson, and Chris Stocke.  It was a very difficult regatta strategically and tactically for many of the top teams in the J/70 fleet. Here is how it all went down over the three-day series.

    Day 1- Thrilling, Gorgeous Thursday
    It was one amazing sailing day in Biscayne Bay, with typical Miami winter conditions of strong breeze, sunshine and small chop. Racing didn’t get better for the 165 teams racing at the Bacardi Invitational Regatta.

    Three races were wrapped up for the J/70 fleet. Three different teams won races and it wasn’t easy task to grab victory amongst such super competitive talent. Owner-driver Carlo Alberini on CALVI NETWORK controlled the leaderboard with scores of 2-6-1 and sat on a 3 point advantage over SURGE (USA) helmed by Ryan McKillen with World Champion tactician Mark Mendelblatt. Two points behind in third was Monaco’s G-SPOTTINO driven by Giangiacomo Serena di Lapigio.

    “Beautiful day out there today for yachting in Miami,” said a happy Ryan McKillen on SURGE. “We had a good day, a seventh, a fourth and a third. Our third Miami event, the Bacardi, and then we snuck in the J/70 Midwinters two weeks ago. So, we did a lot of sailing in Miami this winter.”

    Day 2- Fabulous Friday
    Miami and the South Florida woke up under a cloudy sky with the wind blowing vigorously at 15 to 18 knots from the East/North East. All races started on schedule at 1100 hours across the different race courses on Biscayne Bay. Three races were wrapped up for the J/70s.

    Tough and close battles unfolded on the J/70 course, with the top two teams separated by just four points. Italy’s CALVI NETWORK lost their overnight lead after mistakes in their gennaker drop at one leeward gate rounding, giving the opportunity for CATAPULT (driven by Minnesota’s Joel Ronning) to break away into the top spot. But, with two races on Saturday the game was still wide open. SURGE dropped to third place, and was an 11-point deficit to second.

    “It was a fantastic day in the bay,” said Carlo Alberini of CALVI NETWORK. “The race course here is always interesting and different. “We’re four points from the leader and we’re not going to make it easy for them tomorrow. This year we celebrate our team’s 20th anniversary that started in 1999. We’ve been to this event many times and it is one of our favorites!”

    Day 3- Spectacular Saturday Finale
    Miami and Biscayne Bay today showcased the best day of racing as this iconic racing venue said good-bye to the 500 sailors who competed at the Bacardi Invitational Regatta. A great Easterly breeze of around 10 knots, sun shining, warm, and wave chop a lot less than the previous days, made for a perfect race day. All of the classes finished their scheduled races.

    In the J/70s, the winners were the team on CATAPULT, featuring Joel Ronning, Victor Diaz del Leon, Patrick Wilson and Chris Stoke. They were the most solid and consistent of the fleet with every score inside the top 3, after discarding their 11th in race 3. They racked up a 16 point advantage over second placed Americans onboard McKillen’s SURGE with Mark Mendelblatt calling tactics along with Jon Wallace and Sam Loughborough.  Then, in third was Italy’s CALVI NETWORK with Carlo Alberini driving with crew of Stefano Cherin, Jas Farneti, and Marco Furlan.

    Rounding out the top five was Will Welles’ SCAMP in fourth with crew of Zeke Horowitz, Jake Doyle, and Reed Baldridge.  Fifth was the Mexican team on WOODSTOCK, skippered by Fernando Gutierrez, with crew of Willem van Waay, Javier Gutierrez, and Leopoldo Turco.

    “This was a very fun team to sail with we all got along very well,” commented Ronning on their win with Team CATAPULT. “This group of people is very good at what they do. We had tremendous fun; we were able to minimize mistakes by keeping the dialogue open and if there were any issues they were taken care of right away. It’s a phenomenal event and one of the premier series in the world. It’s very well organized. We love Shake A Leg, we love Bacardi, everybody is so welcoming and we will definitely be coming back.”  For more Bacardi Cup J/70 Winter Series sailing information


    HOSS Was Boss @ J/105 Midwinters 

    (Fort Worth, TX)– The J/105 Midwinter Championship returned to the calendar this year as eleven teams competed at Fort Worth Boat Club in Fort Worth, TX from March 7th to 10th. Locals Glenn Darden and Reese Hillard led the HOSS team to victory with 24 points. They racked up three bullets over the weekend and never finished lower than sixth. Following HOSS in second place was Bill Zartler’s DEJA VOODOO (30 points) and Kenneth Horne’s FINAL FINAL in third (33 points).

    While being awarded the J/105 Midwinter Championship trophy, Darden commented, “It was a wild three days of tight racing with winds ranging from 3 to 30 knots. Eagle Mountain Lake always makes it interesting!

    I would like to thank my HOSS team! First, my co-owner and long-time shipmate Reese Hillard!  Then, trimmer Jake Scott, tactics and mainsheet Tony Waldon, on bow Peter Philpot, and at the mast Lindsay Scott. They really guided and pulled HOSS to the top.

    The Fort Worth Boat Club ran a top-notch event, and PRO Dwight Bengston and his race management team did an outstanding job in getting in eight quality races in three days!  Thanks to everyone again, it was lots of fun!”

    Added Matt Arno, J/105 Chief Measurer, “It’s not often you get to race in three different seasons in three days. Winds from 0 to 40 knots and temperatures from 40F to 80F gave us the full range of conditions. Despite that, racing was tight for the whole regatta.”

    Rounding out the top five was Dwight Horton’s BEAUTY in fourth place with 35 pts, just two points from third. Then, Rick Schaffer’s DOUBLE DARE took fifth with 38 pts. It was very close racing for the teams in 2nd to 5th place, the last two races seeing their positions flip fast like a game of “chutes and ladders”!  Sailing photo credits- Regattashots.com.  For more J/105 Midwinter Championship sailing information
     

    Gorgeous Bahia de Banderas Bay Regatta!
    (Nuevo Vallarta, Mexico)- This year’s Bahia de Banderas Regatta will go down into the history books as yet another almost perfect weekend of sailing on the gorgeous waters off Puerto Vallarta.  Thirty-seven boats in six classes enjoyed postcard perfect weather every day.  The Vallarta YC, based out of Marina Vallarta, provided excellent race management, waiting for the seabreeze to build by noontime before sending the happy-go-lucky sailors out to sea for their races each day. In the end, it was a clean sweep of the top spots by J/Teams in the PHRF Performance classes.

    In PHRF Performance A class, Mike Seth’s beautiful dark navy blue DOUBLE TAKE cruised to both line and handicap honors with a 5-1-1 tally for 7 pts overall.  Following in their wake each day was Lee Pryor’s maroon J/130 SIROCCO, posting a 4-2-2 for 8 pts to take the silver.

    Meanwhile, in PHRF Performance B class, Bart Smit’s beautifully maintained J/105 SINFONIA NAUTICA simply eclipsed their fleet with straight bullets for a total of just 3 pts in three races!

    Finally, the J/80 One-Design Class enjoyed good racing.  Easily taking the class win was Wayne Zittell’s J-WORLD 1 with straight bullets for 3 pts total.  Second was J-WORLD Team 2 and third was J-WORLD Team 3. Follow Bahia de Banderas Regatta on Facebook here   For more Bahia de Banderas Regatta sailing information
     

    Challenging Scatchet Head Race
    (Seattle, WA)- The second race of the Center Sound Series is now on the books, a three-race series hosted by Corinthian YC of Seattle.  The start on Saturday was at 10:00 AM and the fleet had to contend with light airs and lots of current.  The 26.0nm course left the starting mark buoy to port, round Scatchet Head Lighted Gong Buoy (LL#16555) to port, and finish by leaving the finishing mark buoy to port. J/Crews faired well in the challenging race and augmented their series scores to remain in contention for the overall series in a number of classes.

    PHRF 2 Class is comprised of five J/80s and a J/30 in the 11-boat class.  Currently leading in the top two spots are Phil Dean’s J/80 RUSH with a 1-1 for 2 pts and in second is John Sezer’s J/80 RECKLESS with a 3-2 for 5 pts.  Rounding out the top six are David Schutte’s J/80 TAJ MAHAL in 4th with a 2-8, Richard Demmler’s J/80 TASTES LIKE CHICKEN in 5th with a 7-3, and Derek Storms & Cindy Gosset’s J/30 OUTLAW is sitting in 6th with a 4-8.

    Class 4 is the nine-boat J/105 class.  As usual, it is very close racing with three boats tied on 4 points each for the overall lead.  That trio is Chris Phoenix’s JADED with a 3-1, Bucky Rezabek’s RACERS FORMALLY KNOWN AS HERE & NOW with a 1-3, and Erik Kristen’s MORE JUBILEE with a 2-2.  The balance of the top five has Tom Kerr’s CORVO in 4th with a 5-4 and Allen Hughes & Shauna Walgren’s CREATIVE with a 4-6 in 5th place.

    In PHRF 6 class, Don Leighton’s J/35 beautifully refinished TAHLEQUAH is sitting in a comfortable 2nd place with a 2-2.  Meanwhile, Stephanie Arnold & Chuck Queen’s J/33 DASH is hanging on to 4th place in PHRF 5 Class with a 3-7.

    Tolga Cezik’s J/109 LODOS is the top J in PHRF 7 class, sitting in a tie for 4th place with a 4-6.  Then, in PHRF 8 class, Andy Mack’s J/122 GRACE is sitting in a tie for 4th with a 3-6, while the Dougherty/ Andrews duo on their J/125 HAMACHI is just behind them with a 5-5. Finally, in PHRF 0 “big boat” class, we find Bill Fox sailing the gorgeous navy blue J/160 JAM into 5th place, giving them a 4-5 tally for the series and tied for 4th place.  Not bad for a “cruising/ racing” boat racing against a trio of TP52s, and a custom RP55!  For fabulous photos, check out Jan Anderson’s portfolio here  For more Corinthian YC Seattle Center Sound Series sailing information
     

     
    Light Airs Big Daddy Regatta
    J/120 Smokes Class, J/105s Battle!
    (Richmond, CA)- The Big Daddy 2019 Regatta marks the 34th year of mark racing on Saturday and a Pursuit race on Sunday hosted by Richmond YC.  All mono-hulled keelboats with a Northern California PHRF rating of 280 and below were invited. Fleets over 5 boats may be given one-design starts on Saturday. The Sunday Pursuit Race is always a scream.  Then, après’ racing is perhaps the most popular part of the regatta; a great dinner and party with live band on Saturday night and breakfast for all on Sunday morning!

    The sailing on San Francisco Bay in the late winter/ early spring is often not something to write home about.  It can be light, foggy, drifty, cloudy, ugly, rainy. Or, it can be simply a spectacular 10-15 kts sunny day at 70 degrees!  Such is the rights of spring-time weather on the infamous Bay, where “summer” in July can be 52 deg on the water blowing 30 kts (e.g. windchill way, way lower than light air cool days in the spring!).

    Enduring the challenging scenarios were a flock of J/crews ranging from J/24s up to J/111s.  In the PHRF B “big boat” class, it was David Halliwill’s J/120 PEREGRINE from San Francisco YC that took class honors with straight bullets.  Second was last year’s class winner, Nesrin Basoz’s J/111 SWIFT NESS from Richmond YC that took three deuces to secure the silver.

    In the J/105 one-design class, Chris Kim’s VUJA STAR from Richmond YC swept the series with straight bullets. Taking second with all deuces was Eric Patterson’s KESTREL from San Francisco YC and taking the bronze was Dick Maclay’s YELLOWFIN from Berkeley YC.

    George Sirogiannis’ J/35 MOJO from Richmond YC sailed consistently to take 5th place in PHRF C Class.

    Then, in PHRF E Class, the J/70s were doing battle with other sportboats, with the J/70s ultimately ruling the roost.  Winning was Mark Thomas’ J/70 KANGAROO JOCKY from Richmond YC with a 1-2-2 for 5 pts, with Tom Thayer’s J/70 RAMPAGE from Richmond YC posting a 7-1-1 for 9 pts to grab the bronze.

    Finally, a classic J/24 won PHRF F Class!  That honor went to Richard Stockdale’s FROG LIPS taking the gold with a 1-2-1 for 4 pts. Sailing photo credit- Rolex/ Kurt Arrigo.  For more Big Daddy Regatta sailing information
     

    VELA RACING Wins J/22 California Dreamin’ Regatta
    (San Francisco, CA)- The first stop of the annual California Dreamin’ Series, March 9-10 at St. Francis Yacht Club, had racers dreaming of classic San Francisco Bay sailing. However, two days of rain, variable wind, squalls, lightning and squirrely current didn’t deter local match racing champion Nicole Breault and her team of Molly Carapiet, Karen Loutzenheiser and Hannah Burroughs. The four women, known as Vela Racing, bested the fleet of eight, scoring 11 bullets in 12 races – losing just once to Breault’s husband, Bruce Stone, and his team of Spencer Paulsen, Stephanie Wondolleck and Halsey Richartz, who finished third overall. Second place was nabbed by Chris Nesbitt, sailing with Drew Guay, Michael Nicoletti and Kara Voss.

    “It was very challenging out there,” said Breault, who’s the top-ranked women’s match racer in the United States. “The theme of this weekend was ‘this is so weird,’ which accounts for all the variables, the currents, the cross-currents. We’ve been sailing together for a long time and we’re trying to gear up for the Nations Cup, coming here to the St. Francis on April 10-14. This was a great warm-up for us and lays a solid foundation for the year.”

    Stone credited his win over Breault and his Day 2 picket fence to “risk minimization,” sailing away in the pre-starts as he observed the other competitors getting to the line too early in the flood tide. The strategy boosted him to a podium finish.

    Principal Race Officer Jeff Zarwell was profuse in his thanks to the umpires, who hailed from throughout the West Coast and Canada, and the race management team who endured challenging mark sets in unpredictable currents caused by the freshwater run-off of recent rains coursing over the saltier flood tide. “We hadn’t even gotten to max flood and it was already ebbing,” he exclaimed on the second day, which delayed mark-setting for some of what turned out to be the final heats when the wind shifted and then died and lightning spiked across the Bay, putting an early end to racing.

    America’s Cup veteran Russell Long, who finished near the back of the pack, said the weekend’s racing “got his adrenaline going” and praised the maneuverability and responsiveness of the Club’s J/22s, compared to the keelboats he’s accustomed to racing in the past. “Match racing has really evolved from when I used to do it,” he said. “The game is more aggressive now than 30, 35 years ago. It’s a pleasure to see the ability of some of these young people.”

    The California Dreamin’ Series brings together eight teams from around the US to compete in a double round-robin format. The next stop will be at San Diego Yacht Club on October 5-6, 2019, followed by Long Beach Yacht Club on November 2-3, 2019.   Sailing photo credits- Chris Ray   For more J/22 California Dreamin’ sailing information
     

    J/Crews Sweep St Croix International Regatta
    (Christiansted, St. Croix, USVI)- The St Croix Yacht Club, situated on the sensational sandy beach on Teague Bay in St Croix, USVI, just completed its popular St Croix International Regatta last weekend.  The event takes place over three days.  On Friday March 8th was Capt Nick's Race; a salute to Captain Nick Castruccio "Tail Hook Nick" and sharing his life long passion for racing and the sea.  Then, on Saturday and Sunday, it was International Regatta, two days of fun, fast and exciting mix of CSA handicap racing for the whole family.  The fleet enjoyed an array of courses set in picturesque Buck Island channel.

    In the CSA Spinnaker class, Peter Stanton’s J/24 CRUCIAN CONFUSION all four races in the Capt Nick’s Race and five of the six races in the Regatta, winning class quite convincingly.  Mirroring those scores all three days was Mackenzie Bryan’s bright red J/100 BAD GIRL, with all 2nds and one 1st to take the silver.
    For more St Croix International Regatta sailing information
     

    J/Community
    What friends, alumni, and crew of J/Boats are doing worldwide
    -----------
     
    * J/145 #9, now called KATARA, is returning to her racing roots under new owner Roger Gatewood from Tampa, Florida.  She will be flying the Davis Island Yacht Club flag out of Tampa Bay. Their 2019 schedule includes the Pineapple Cup, the RORC Caribbean 600, the Heineken St Maarten Regatta, Antigua Race Week, and culminates with the Transpac Race in 2019 that is celebrating its 50th year!

    So far, they are getting faster and faster. In the Caribbean, they raced the CSA rating rule measured with a 157% genoa! Yikes, that has not helped their cause in the 15-25 kt trade winds! They are now getting re-rated for a 105% #3 jib like all the other competitors for their final Caribbean event.

    Sean Motta, navigator of KATARA, explained they were first at every windward mark in the Heineken St Maarten Regatta and the fact they had no time to re-rate her for the CSA Rule after getting her shipped from the Pacific Northwest USA to Antigua.  Nevertheless, a quick “back of the napkin” calculation by Motta indicated they could have won “the Heineken” with their #3 jib.

    After Antigua Race Week, KATARA will head downwind in the easterly tradewinds to Panama.  Transit the Panama Canal, and continue their delivery up to Los Angeles for the start of the Transpac Race on July 10th, 2019. They will get rated for ORR for the Transpac Race. Thanks for this heads-up from Sean Motta, navigator of KATARA!  Enjoy their Tampa Bay sailing video here on YouTube


    * Team MBR (McGuffin Brothers Racing) Racing a J/24 to Alaska!?

    It was in 2018 that four brothers in their late teens/20’s stopped whatever activity they were doing on Salt Spring Island (British Columbia), stared at the R2AK Race that swarmed around their island, and reached a collective conclusion: “There is an undefinable but compelling reason that we are drawn into this adventure,” and Team McGuffin Brothers Racing was born out of its own name.

    At ages 18, 19, 19, and 22 years old, they are dead even with youngest team to ever enter.  The team members include Cianan McGuffin, Finn McGuffin, Callum McGuffin, and “brother in arms” Conner Ekelund.

    Who are these ripped young’uns from the generation Millennials? Combined, they are sailors who dinghy train on 49ers every week, paddle a SUP 40 miles at a clip, hike the trails, paddle dragon racing canoes, amongst many other outdoor activities.

    Short version: these guys aren’t waiting for life to happen, they’re happening to life.

    Our favorite part: their goal is to use their soon to be R2AK-glory to springboard themselves into the world of professional sailing.

    Their words: “We don’t see how Oracle Team USA could refuse us after we’ve completed this race!”  Two words: Larry Ellison.

    While their guidance counselor might have just drank the other half of the bottle, she can rest easy on her desktop knowing they at least chose a boat well-suited as any for taking them to the land of salty opportunity. The J/24 might be the world’s most ubiquitous racing sled for this or any race.  Its got a keel to keep the wet side down, flared sides to keep the saltwater off the dry side, and a tiny cabin to create a bubble of sleepable moistness between the rain and sea. There are over 5,400+ of these things charging around the buoys worldwide.  If you run the numbers, like we didn’t, literally at any given moment there are no less than seven J/24s sailing or nearly sailing somewhere around Mother Earth!  That’s astounding! As far as we know, so far not one of them has gone engineless to Alaska! Cool.

    Note- these guys will be using oars, or maybe propellers driven by bicycles, in addition to other things to propel themselves along the tortuous route to the finish line.

    Follow Team MBR and their sailing exploits on Facebook here  For more McGuffin Brothers Racing Team information  For more Race 2 Alaska sailing informationAdd to Flipboard Magazine.

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  • Thrills for Two, The Clever New J/99

    Thrills for Two, The Clever New J/99 (Hamble, England)- According to Yachting World’s Pip Hare, “the J/99 isall thrills, no frills on board the versatile 32 foot offshorespeedster.” She continued to explain her feelings and perspective inthis in-depth test of the J/99 sailing in the Solent in southernEngland:

    “We ghosted down the Hamble River under mainsail alone, the waterslipping silently past our red hull in the grainy half-light of a wintermorning. We’d hoisted the mainsail in our marina berth, then sailed outinto the river, the engine left in tick-over for less than two minutesalmost as a token gesture. I felt like a naughty kid, slipping out,while the rest of the world was still waking up; going to make sometrouble.

    I had come to test the new J/99, sailing double-handed with the BritishJ/Boats importer J/U.K. on a chilly, blustery January morning. Withinten minutes our demure departure was all but forgotten as we camebursting out of Southampton Water, our senses assaulted from all anglesby the bitter north wind and our 100m2 day-glo spinnaker. As the sunrose, everything about the day and this little powerhouse of a boatbecame bright, sharp and dynamic. I don’t know what the rest of theworld was doing at 0800 on that January morning, but we were having ablast.

    The eagerly awaited J/99 directly targets a growing demographic ofsailors who enjoy the fantastic short-handed racing scene available allacross Europe. Of the 50+ orders already confirmed, over half of the newowners intend to race short-handed and it was with this type of sailingin mind I arrived to make the test.

    The new design incorporates some interesting changes for J/Boats, whichbring the J/99 into line with its closest rivals in this area of themarket. Gone is the retractable bowsprit and furling jib, which havebeen the stalwarts of J/Boat design for close to 20 years, making wayfor a beamier shape, a fixed bowsprit and a hank-on jib. It’s different,but despite the new features, this still remains resolutely ‘J’ in itsappearance and feel.

    From the first moment I stepped into the cockpit, this boat struck mewith its no-nonsense approach. Sail handling is simple, the cockpitclean and well laid-out, the helm dynamic and responsive. Just cruisingdown the river, the boat felt light and seemed to directly translateevery puff of wind into increased speed. Compared to the Class 40s Ihave spent much of the last two years racing, the J/99 felt like ago-cart – a promising combination of agility and power.”   Read the rest of her in-depth review of the J/99 on Yachting World here.   For more J/99 Offshore Speedster sailboat informationAdd to Flipboard Magazine.

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  • Open House! See the NEW J/99 Offshore Speedster

    Open House! See the NEW J/99 Offshore Speedster
    Newport - Houston - San Francisco!
    (Newport, RI)- Treat yourself to a visit to take a tour of the new boatthat is taking over Europe by storm (50+ boats) and is turning headseverywhere it goes around the world! The new J/99 shorthanded offshore speedsterwill have an Open House on Saturday, June 1st at three differentlocations nationwide- Newport, RI / Houston (Seabrook), TX / SanFrancisco (Alameda), CA.

    If you wish to see the J/99 firsthand, please fill out the online webform here to get an invitation and more details.

    For more J/99 Shorthanded Offshore Speedster information
    Add to Flipboard Magazine.

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  • Blustery American YC Spring Series Finale

    Blustery American YC Spring Series Finale
    (Rye, NY)- The second and final weekend of the 40th Annual AmericanYacht Club Spring Series Regatta concluded this past weekend in the sameway it started on April 27-28; with challenging weather that includedlittle wind on Saturday and heavy rain and 30 kt gusts on Sunday.

    However, this didn’t prevent excellent performances, as determinedsailors on over 70 boats in nine separate boat classes – IRC, PHRF,J/44, J/109, J/88, J/105, J/70, and J/80- toughed it out and got in goodracing on western Long Island Sound.

    With two races on Sunday, Mike Bruno’s WINGS placed first in the J/88division and continued building on a hot streak that dates back toJanuary with a win at the J/88 Midwinter Championship in St. Petersburg,FL. Elizabeth Barry’s team on ESCAPE had sailed strongly the previousweekend, but had a rough time in the rough weather and her 4th placefinish in her last race dropped her into a tie with WINGS with 6 ptseach, but lost the tie-breaker on most 1sts.  Taking third was KevinMarks’ VELOCITY.

    WINGS skipper Mike Bruno commented, “it was pretty brutal, rain, low 50sair temp, 44 degree water temp, gusting to 25 kts plus or more in thelast race was tough on everyone. One of our competitors pulled their jibcars off the deck, and the Canadians just called it a day, notsurprised. We were happy, grateful, to get around the track in the lastrace to win and also get the series win.”

    In the J/109 Class, Rosow’s LOKI continued their dominating performance,posting a 2nd on the last day to win with just 4 pts net!  By winningthe last race, John Greifzu’s GROWTH SPURT leapt into the silver spot,while Robert Schwartz’s NORDLYS placed 4th in the finale to drop intothird place. .

    Continuing their amazing string of 2nds was Paul Beaudin’s J/105 LOULOU. With yet another two 2nds, LOU LOU won with just 7 pts net. JohnKoten’s GRAY MATTER posted a 6-1 to jump up the leaderboard to grab thesilver medal.  Meanwhile, “the kids” on YOUNG AMERICAN dropped off thepace, posting an 11-3 to fall to fifth in the challenging conditions. Then, David Greenhouse’s SKIPPERDEE had an outstanding day with a 3-4 tograb the bronze position.  Rounding out the top five was David Willis’SOLUTION in 4th and YOUNG AMERICAN 5th.

    In the J/70s, Dan Goldberg’s BAZINGA barely held on to their lead to winby a point.  It was the hard-charging duo of Carrie & Ed Austin’sCHINOOK that posted double bullets to nearly pull off a surprise win onSunday.  Third was J-RHINO.

    The East Course saw Commodore Ketcham maintain their lead in the J/44fleet to take the class win with 8 pts net. Reveling in the roughconditions was Don & Dick Rave’s RESOLUTE, firing on all cylindersto post a 1-2-1 scoreline Sunday and grab the silver. Just behind themwas Len Sitar’s VAMP in third position.

    In the PHRF Racing division, Scott Devine’s brand new J/112E REVIVERclosed with a smoking hot 2-2 as they prepared for their summer seasonof racing.  Meanwhile, Ron Richman’s J/133 ANTIDOTE closed the regattain fourth place. Finally, in the PHRF Plus One division, Steven Levy’sJ/121 EAGLE took second place.  For more American YC Spring Series sailing informationAdd to Flipboard Magazine.

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  • Pretty, Challenging Race to the Straits

    Pretty, Challenging Race to the Straits  
    (Seattle, WA)- “This past weekend’s Sloop Tavern YC “Race to theStraits” was yet another not-to-be missed event- it is all singlehandedor doublehanded teams. Saturday’s leg to Port Townsend was a light wind,current-plagued challenge, with a lot of did not finishes. Sunday’s legback was with plenty of breeze from the north, spinnakers flying andsmiles all around,” said Kurt Hoehne from Sailish.com.

    “Of all the great aspects of this race,” continued Hoehne, ”my favoriteis that it draws a whole lot of boats that “don’t” race out to race.There are couples, dogs, kids, cruisers and sails of every imaginableand unimaginable condition. Win or lose, it always appears to be a goodtime. And, with the staggered start (figuring handicaps into the starttime) it seems to make the whole thing about results more palatable. Itis what racing should be. On Saturday, it was a day for concentrationand a lot of tacks. One skipper estimated he did 60 tacks! On Sunday,the boats with big spinnakers and long waterlines reveled.”

    A number of J/Teams love doing this event since it is so, sooo laidback. Winning the PHRF Class 4 Singlehanded Flying Sails Division wasthe J/35 GREAT WHITE sailed by Dan Wierman. Meanwhile, Kevin Callahan’sJ/80 NAMASTE took third despite having to take a DNF in Saturday’s race.In PHRF Class 6 Doublehanded division, Scott Galbraith’s J/24 FLYERtook fourth. Ulg Georg Gwildis’ J/30 IMPULSIVE also took a fourth inPHRF 8 Class. The two J/27s in PHRF 9 Class both podiumed, DennisClark’s LXIII getting silver while Leo Morales’ WIZARD took the bronze.

    In the J/80 one-design class, seven doublehanded teams started but notmany finished due to the light airs on Saturday.  Ultimately, DavidSchutte’s TAJ MAHAL won, followed by Morris Lowitz’s UPROAR in secondand Lek Dimarucot’s UNDERDOG in third.

    Christine Nelson’s J/29 SLICK sailed fast, narrowly missing the PHRF 11Doublehanded Class win by just six minutes after 12 hours of sailingtime!  She took the silver quite comfortably.

    The six-boat J/105 doublehanded class always has pretty close racing,even on the point-to-point events.  This time, it was John Aitchison’sMOOSE UNKNOWN that took class honors, followed by MatthewGardner-Brown’s DULCINEA in second and Sara Billey’s PEER GYNET inthird.

    J/crews smoked the PHRF 15 Doublehanded class.  Winning was KirkFraser’s J/109 ECLIPSE, with Tad Fairbank’s J/100 SELAH in second, TysonVarosyan’s J/35 SOLUTION in third, Stu Burnell’s J/109 TANTIVY infourth, and Tolga Cezik’s J/109 LODOS in seventh.

    Finally, in PHRF 16 Doublehanded class it was Chris & Justin Wolfe’sJ/120 SHEARWATER that placed 2nd while the Hinze/ Butler duo on theJ/120 HINZITE took fourth position.   Sailing photo credits- Jan Anderson/ Janpix  Follow the Sloop Tavern YC’s sailing events on Facebook here  For more Sloop Tavern YC sailing information

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  • J/121 Spring Tune-Up Regatta

    J/121 Spring Tune-Up Regatta (Newport, RI)- For the second year in a row, J/Boats is hosting theJ/121 Spring Tune-up Regatta at Newport Shipyard on the famous NewportHarbor. The event is open to all J/121s and is free.  For any J/Sailorsinterested in checking out J/121s, please come on down to the docks andtake a peek!

    The schedule starts Friday, May 17th at 1230 hrs for the Welcome andcheck-in.  Then, there will be on-the-water training on Narragansett Bayin the afternoon.  Afterwards, there is a debrief session with munchiesand refreshments.

    On Saturday, there will be a skipper’s briefing at 0930 hrs and,thereafter, there is starting drills and short-course racing withon-the-water coaching until 1600 hrs. Again, a debrief with refreshmentsat Newport Shipyard will conclude the event.  To learn more about the J/121 offshore speedsterAdd to Flipboard Magazine.

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  • MERCURY Wins J/80 Cantabrian Championship

    MERCURY Wins J/80 Cantabrian Championship
    (Santander, Spain)- The Real Club Nautico Santander hosted the 2019Cantabrian J/80 Championship off their beautiful northern shores ofSpain.  There was two great days of sailing in the fabulously beautifulSardinero Bay. On Saturday it blew from the northwest (300 deg) about 10knots with a very flat sea. Sunday dawned with a fresh easterly windwith even flatter waters (since it was blowing offshore) and the windnever dropped below 18 kts!

    Many of the famous Spanish J/80 champion sailors were in attendance, such as multiple World Champion- Pichu Torcida.

    After a closely fought six-race series where the top five boats wereonly separated by six points in the end, it was Jaime Piris’ MERCURYthat was declared the Cantabrian J/80 Champion with a total of 12 ptsnet. Taking second was none other than Ignacio Camino, himself a J/80World Champion. Then, third was CASTELAR BUILDING, owned by Daniel de laPedraia, and skippered by Diego Botin (yes, a member of that famoussailing family that is Botin Naval Architects).  Rounding out the topfive was Angel Herrerias in fourth and yet another J/80 World Chammpionin 5th place- Jose Maria “Pichu” Torcida.

    Julia Casanueva’s CENTRAL OPTICA, with Eva Gonzalez at the helm, werethe Women Champions (they finished 10th overall in the Open Division). For more J/80 Cantabrian Championship sailing informationAdd to Flipboard Magazine.

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  • LA SUPERBA Crowned J/24 European Champion!

    LA SUPERBA Crowned J/24 European Champion!
    (Patras, Greece)- This past week the Sailing Club of Patras hosted 175+ sailors and thirty-five crews from all around Europe forthe 2019 J/24 European Championship. Participating teams came from GreatBritain, Germany, Greece, Hungary, and Italy.  In the end, it was Italy's Ignazio Bonanno skippering LA SUPERBA with his Italian Navy crew, that were declared 2019 J/24 European Champions; winning with a day to spare!

    Day 1- Spectacular Windy Day
    Thirty J/24s vied in three races in winds of 15-25 knots to open to 2019J/24 European Championship, hosted by the Sailing Club of Patras inGreece. Four different nations comprise the top four: Stefan Karsunke’sSCHWERE JUNGS of Germany (5 points), Ignazio Bonanno’s LA SUPERBA ofItaly (8 points), Miklos Rauschenberger’s EL NINO of Hungary andAnthimos Nikolaidis’ EVNIKI of Greece (17 points).

    Bonanno’s LA SUPERBA opened the Championship successfully as the breezestarted in the mid-teens. Karsunke’s SCHWERE JUNGS and Rauschenberger’sEl Nino followed. Nikolaidis’ EVNIKI won race two when the winds beganpiping up, and both Karsunke and Bonanno kept their claim at the frontend of the fleet. Karsunke capped a nearly perfect day with a bullet,ahead of Panagiotis Kampouridis’ JMania and Alexandros Tagaropoulos’HELLENIC POLICE in Tuesday’s last race.

    Day 2- A Pretty Day on The Med
    Six races have been completed so far. Ignazio Bonanno’s LASUPERBA of Italy has jumped into first place. With scores of 3,2,3 onWednesday, and factoring in the discard race (a fourth for them), LASUPERBA tallies just 12 net points. Anthimos Nikolaidis’ EVNIKI ofGreece moved up a spot to second overall (17 points), and fellowcountryman Alexandros Tagaropoulos’ HELLENIC POLICE can now be found inthird (25 points).

    Winds began at 5-8 knots under blue skies and increased to 10-12 by day’s end for the 30 J/24s.

    Nikolaidis rattled off two bullets in the first two races on Wednesday,shadowed initially by Tagaropoulos and Bonanno, and then again byBonanno and Dave Hale’s CACOON of Great Britain. Two German teams rockedthe day’s final and windiest battle: Lynn Wolgast’s all-women's crew on DERBE KERLE won the race (photo below of bow #19) andThomas Cramer’s JUX & DOLLEREI took second place. Bonanno placed third.

    Day 3- More Breeze, More Sun!
    In nine of 10 scheduled races at the J/24 European Championship, IgnazioBonanno’s LA SUPERBA consistently placed in the top four. Factoring inone discard for the Series, that left the Italian team as the J/24 EuropeanChampions for the second time (they also won in 2012 in their homecountry), with one race to spare. Retaining scores of only firsts,seconds and thirds, LA SUPERBA scored just 18 pts net!

    Teams battling for the balance of the podium are over 18 points inarrears. Those teams include Anthimos Nikolaidis’ EVNIKI, AlexandrosTagaropoulos’ HELLENIC POLICE, Panagiotis Kampouridis’ J-MANIA andStefan Karsunke’s SCHWERE JUNGS. The other thirty J/24s conclude racingFriday, with just one race scheduled.

    The top Women’s J/24 European Champion contender is Lynn Wolgast’s Germanall-women crew from the Muhlenberger Segel-Club sailing on DERBE KERLE;she sits in 9th place with 70 pts net.

    Conditions were perfect again on Thursday, with breeze at 10-15 knots,sunny skies and warmer temperatures. Bonanno’s LA SUPERBA notched theirsecond bullet of the series to start the day, tailed by two Germanteams— Stephan Mais’ RUNNINGMEN and Karsunke’s SCHWERE JUNGS.Kampouridis’ J-MANIA of Greece snagged the win in the day’s middlebattle, while Bonanno settled for second and Nikolaidis’ EVNIKI third.Then Kampouridis’ J-MANIA went back-to-back with another victory, aheadof Karsunke and Bonanno. Sailing photo credits: Batistatos Spyros/ ChrisHowell   Follow the J/24 European Championship on Facebook here  For more J/24 European Championship sailing informationAdd to Flipboard Magazine.

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  • Cold, Windy MAIOR Cup Regatta

    Cold, Windy MAIOR Cup Regatta
    (Kiel, Germany)- Hosted by Kieler YC in Kiel-Schilksee, Germany, theMAIOR CUP Regatta took place from May 3rd to 5th in similar cold, wet,windy sailing conditions as did the Bundesliga down in southern Germany.The one-design fleets of J/70s and J/80s were participating in theirfirst major regatta of the season and they were certainly put to thetest, straining both boats and humans to the brink of exhaustion.

    Day One- Cold, Wet & Wild
    On the first day, it was cold in the Kiel Fjord and it blew hard- 20 to25 kts all day with big seas. As the offshore crews struggled on thelong haul outside course, the J/70 and J/80 classes fought close toland.

    "Turning right in front of the harbor entrance was quite unusual," saidJ/80 skipper Martin Menzner. “As a result, we were so far inside, we hadsmoother water than the guys outside.”

    After three races, Menzner’s PIKE crew had a 1-2-1 to be one point aheadof Arne Wilcken’s DIVA. Menzner joked, “Arne is the reason why I'veexchanged half of my crew for this year! Thank goodness for my new crewmembers- Lars Keilwitz and Hannes Renzsch- they worked well with me andour other crew- Nils Berltermann!”

    In the J/70 class, Charlotte Braun-Dullaeus’ crew on JINTO (TobiasStrenge, Florian Herrmann, Terje Klockemann) sailed fast and furious,winning the first race and ending the day with a 3-2 to lead the regattaby a point.  Just behind her was Gerd Knospe’s SANNA R in second andHauke Thilow’s GER 1079 in third.

    Day Two- More Demanding Conditions
    Although the wind had slowed slightly compared to the start on Friday,the wind was shiftier and puffier, more extreme in fact. Again, theJ/70s and J/80s had their course tucked in close to land in flatterwater, but the puffs were more extreme!

    “Of course, it was important to be in the right place at the righttime," said Nils Beltermann, a crewman on Menzner’s PIKE. "We have donewell today and are leading, but only by three points!  Our friend DIVAis fast and does not give up!”

    In the J/70 class, Charlotte Braun-Dullaeus drove JINTO fast and on tothe top of the leaderboard with a strong series of races for the day- a1-4-2-1-2. She displaced the Berlin crew on SANNA R, dropping them intosecond.  The big move of the day was Tania Tammling’s all-women crewfrom Hamburg that sailed ALBIS into third place by the end of the daywith a blazing hot 4-2-3-2! Her crew consisted of Kristin Mertner,Carlotta Meewes, Ragna Thonnessen, and Franziska Wilckens.

    Day 3- Blessed Sun Shines
    Sunday provided the perfect atmosphere for the final day of the regatta;sun, moderate breeze, clear skies, and much warmer temperatures. Smilesall around the docks as people hopped aboard their boats for just twomore races to complete the regatta.

    "It was very tricky on Sunday," said J/80 class winning skipper MartinMenzner. “We are thankful that we had three very good days of sailing,we sailed well, no dramas, and finished well. My new team was goodall-around!“  Taking second in the J/80s was Arne Wilcken’s DIVA andthird was Hauke Kruss’ TAK FOR TUREN.

    There was a lot of drama in the J/70 class.  Having scored four 1sts inthe first eight races, it was anyone’s guess that Knospe’s SANNA R crewcould repeat those performances on the final day. In the first race,SANNA R did just that, winning it while JINTO took third, closing towithin one point of Charlotte’s team.  However, in the last race,Charlotte sailed fast, stayed out of trouble, and scored a deuce, whileSANNA R finished right behind them. As a result, Charlotte and her crewon JINTO jumped for joy, breathing a sigh of relief as they won theregatta with 17 pts net. Knospe’s SANNA R took second with 19 pts netand Tammling’s all-women team on ALBIS took the bronze (also winning theHelga Cup Special Award for best women’s team).

    "That was very exciting and close. We actually had a plan to decide whatwe would do in the penultimate race, but that did not work," saidJINTO’s skipper Charlotte Braun-Dullaeus. "Our advantage was that wesailed very consistently, even on Sunday, which was probably the mostdemanding sailing day. It was really hard to judge some things,especially crossing situations upwind. We’re happy to win and thank myamazing crew!”  Watch a nice sailing highlights video of the MAIOR CUP Regatta here  For more MAIOR CUP Regatta sailing informationAdd to Flipboard Magazine.

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  • Spirited Yachting Cup Regatta

    Spirited Yachting Cup Regatta
    (San Diego, CA)- There were plenty of high-fives, handshakes andcelebratory cheers back on the docks after the final day of the SanDiego Yacht Club’s Yachting Cup. Congratulations were exchanged andcamaraderie was shared by all.

    The Yachting Cup perpetual trophy for the J/120 class is covered withwinning plaques over the years for Chuck Nichol’s CC RIDER and JohnLaun’s CAPER. So, it was no surprise to see SDYC Staff Commodore’s JohnLaun and Chuck Nichols back at the top of the standings battling foranother tally on the trophy. This year it was CAPER’s turn, as they wonthe first three races on their way to the win. Taking third was ErniePennell’s MAD MEN.

    “It was a lot of fun. We were able to get good breeze both days up to 11and 12 knots. We were in the Far Ocean course. It was very shifty andchallenging at times, but it worked out well. We’re lucky to come outfirst in our class,” said Bill Campbell, tactician on CAPER.

    “The first race yesterday [Saturday] stood out to us the most. We got onthe water, hit our stride early on, and Bill and John nailed the start.We extended our lead the whole race, and it was really fun,” added AlliBell, trimmer on CAPER.

    SDYC relies heavily on the local J/105 class to support its signaturefall regattas, the International Masters and Lipton Cup regattas. Manyof the J/105s used to run those events competed in this year’s YachtingCup with fleet captain Stewart Cannon’s J-OK finishing on top whilewinning the final three races of the weekend.  Second was the duo ofDriscoll & Hurlburt on the bright orange JUICED and third was Steve& Lucy Howell’s BLINK.

    Jeff Janov’s J/70 MINOR TRHEAT used wins in the last two races to takethe class win over Tony Collins’ FLY in a competitive seven race seriesfor the J/70s.  Third was Steve Wyman’s NUNUHUNU, fourth Bruce Cooper’sUSA 32 and fifth Kim Kundrak’s USA 206 (she was also the Corinthiandivision winner).

    David Boatner’s J/35 RIVAL, who was an overall winner at the 2016Yachting Cup, narrowly won the PHRF C Class with four bullets and twodeuces for 8 pts net.  Sailing Photo credits- Mark Albertazzi   For more Yachting Cup San Diego sailing informationAdd to Flipboard Magazine.

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  • Stormy German J/70 Sailing League- Act I

    Stormy German J/70 Sailing League- Act I
    (Starnberg, Germany)- The 2019 Deutsche Segel-Bundesliga started off itsseason in Starnberg, Germany, on a beautiful Alpine mountain lake inthe southern part of the country- the Starnberger See. Thirty-sixsailing clubs from across the country participated in somewhat hellishsailing conditions from May 3rd to May 5th. The fleet showed theirfighting spirit, having to stave off cold, wet weather (2.0 deg C/ 35F!) and extreme hailstorms.

    Winning the 1st Bundesliga Division was the Verein Seglerhaus am Wannsee(VSaW) from Berlin and winning the 2nd League was the BlankeneserSegel-Club (BSC) from Hamburg.

    "It was hard! The cold, the hail, and the storm- these were three reallyexhausting days, because staying power was needed! We are all the moreproud, of course, to be able to win the first match of the season!That's what we hope to do again at the next event in Konstanz,” saysJasper Wagner, helmsman of VSaW. Sailing with him as his crew were FelixBergmann, Elias Rothe and Max Salzwedel.

    After a very close fight to the last race of the event, the ChiemseeYacht Club and the Bavarian Yacht Club took 2nd and 3rd on the podium,respectively.

    "It was an exciting battle! We trained relatively little, but weimproved a lot over the four days and gave it everything we could!,”said the helmsman from Lake Chiemsee, Leopold Fricke.  His team includedMoritz Fricke, Lorenz Huber and Simon Tripp.

    In the 2nd Bundesliga Division, the team from Blankeneser Segel-Clubprevailed against tough competition. Their winning crew consisted ofClaas Lehmann, Florian Dzsiesiaty, Justus Kellner and Valentin Zeller.Second place went to the Hamburg Segel-Club with the only all-women’screw in event, and then taking third place was the Potsdam Yacht Club.

    In two weeks (May 17 to 19, 2018), the next event of the 1st and 2ndsailing Bundesliga will take place on Lake Constance, hosted by theKonstanzer Yacht Club.  Watch exciting sailing highlights of the Starnberg J/70 event here  For more Deutsche Segel-Bundesliga sailing informationAdd to Flipboard Magazine.

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